Tag: vision



Information and well-reasoned arguments are rarely of much benefit to cause pivotal change. In Switch, by Dan Heath and Chip Heath, the authors detail dozens of examples of two different approaches to influencing (organizational and individual) behavior.



Think/Analyze/Change

One approach is Think/Analyze/Change. In this approach you present the facts. If you do this, this will happen. You make reasoned arguments. You encourage people to think like the rational human beings you expect them to be.

But the problem is, most people don’t make decisions based on carefully reasoned decisions. Of course, to the individual, every decision is reasonable. Our students believe they have a good reasons for their choices. It’s always important to remember students, and people in general, do things for their reasons and not ours.

So when we use “telling” as a strategy to reason with students about why they should comply, follow rules, or try harder, it probably goes in one ear and out the other, except for the students who already agree with our reasoning, and they aren’t the ones who need to hear it.

See/Feel/Change

So the second approach is See/Feel/Change. This approach has been shown time and again to be far more effective in creating behavioral change. This approach makes change more visible. It often relies on mental pictures and narratives that people can really connect with. It focuses on heart needs. It connects with the person emotionally. That is critically important. 



While we would all like to think we’re rational beings, we’ve made some of the biggest decisions of our life based on emotion…where we went to college, who we married, deciding to have kids, buying a house or that new car. There were powerful emotions at play in all of those decisions.

To be a change agent, you have to use See/Feel/Change strategies. 



Here are five tips…

1. The energy you bring to your classroom communicates expectations more powerfully than your words. If you bring enough purpose, passion, and energy to the space, you communicate to students that this teacher is not going to accept less than my best. Keep in mind your rules are no match for student habits.

2. Give your students experiences. Use demonstrations. Use role playing. Make the principles you are trying to teach visible and interactive and don’t rely on just “telling.” Invite students to reflect on experiences and draw meaning from concrete examples.

3. Tell stories. People connect with stories. So if you have a story that illustrates a principle, use it. But also tie it to a higher purpose. So instead of telling a story of how your son or daughter was complemented in his/her job for showing up on time and keeping his cell phone put away, share how proud you are as a parent that your child is doing well in his adult life. Our kids want their parents to be proud of them. Or, talk about how he or she is taking such good care of their family. Our students may not care about a career at 15 years old. But they do care about the things all people care about (relationships, feeling significant, being good at something, family, connection, etc.).

4. Teach specific first steps to make the change a reality. If students experience some success in an area, they are more likely to continue down that path. So don’t just say, remember to do your homework. Help them make plans for exactly what steps they will take to do their homework. Planning first steps is extremely important to creating change. Don’t assume they know what to do.

5. Help students find a sense of purpose. People who lack purpose have no reason to change. They have no hope. Encourage students by believing in their possibilities and by giving them encouragement to grow. Students are more likely to invest themselves when they feel meaning and purpose. Learning must be more meaningful than a grade or a test score.

Final thoughts…

Students (all people actually) do things for their reasons, not ours.

Information without emotion is rarely retained. And information rarely changes behavior.

Be mindful of how you can add the greatest value to students who could benefit from changed habits. Be a change agent.



Let me here from you. What are strategies you’ve used to help student’s make pivotal changes? I’m talking about real, lasting change. Share a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. I look forward to hearing your thoughts. 

Read More What’s the Key to Influencing Your Students?



Information and well-reasoned arguments are rarely of much benefit to cause pivotal change. In Switch, by Dan Heath and Chip Heath, the authors detail dozens of examples of two different approaches to influencing (organizational and individual) behavior.



Think/Analyze/Change

One approach is Think/Analyze/Change. In this approach you present the facts. If you do this, this will happen. You make reasoned arguments. You encourage people to think like the rational human beings you expect them to be.

But the problem is, most people don’t make decisions based on carefully reasoned decisions. Of course, to the individual, every decision is reasonable. Our students believe they have a good reasons for their choices. It’s always important to remember students, and people in general, do things for their reasons and not ours.

So when we use “telling” as a strategy to reason with students about why they should comply, follow rules, or try harder, it probably goes in one ear and out the other, except for the students who already agree with our reasoning, and they aren’t the ones who need to hear it.

See/Feel/Change

So the second approach is See/Feel/Change. This approach has been shown time and again to be far more effective in creating behavioral change. This approach makes change more visible. It often relies on mental pictures and narratives that people can really connect with. It focuses on heart needs. It connects with the person emotionally. That is critically important. 



While we would all like to think we’re rational beings, we’ve made some of the biggest decisions of our life based on emotion…where we went to college, who we married, deciding to have kids, buying a house or that new car. There were powerful emotions at play in all of those decisions.

To be a change agent, you have to use See/Feel/Change strategies. 



Here are five tips…

1. The energy you bring to your classroom communicates expectations more powerfully than your words. If you bring enough purpose, passion, and energy to the space, you communicate to students that this teacher is not going to accept less than my best. Keep in mind your rules are no match for student habits.

2. Give your students experiences. Use demonstrations. Use role playing. Make the principles you are trying to teach visible and interactive and don’t rely on just “telling.” Invite students to reflect on experiences and draw meaning from concrete examples.

3. Tell stories. People connect with stories. So if you have a story that illustrates a principle, use it. But also tie it to a higher purpose. So instead of telling a story of how your son or daughter was complemented in his/her job for showing up on time and keeping his cell phone put away, share how proud you are as a parent that your child is doing well in his adult life. Our kids want their parents to be proud of them. Or, talk about how he or she is taking such good care of their family. Our students may not care about a career at 15 years old. But they do care about the things all people care about (relationships, feeling significant, being good at something, family, connection, etc.).

4. Teach specific first steps to make the change a reality. If students experience some success in an area, they are more likely to continue down that path. So don’t just say, remember to do your homework. Help them make plans for exactly what steps they will take to do their homework. Planning first steps is extremely important to creating change. Don’t assume they know what to do.

5. Help students find a sense of purpose. People who lack purpose have no reason to change. They have no hope. Encourage students by believing in their possibilities and by giving them encouragement to grow. Students are more likely to invest themselves when they feel meaning and purpose. Learning must be more meaningful than a grade or a test score.

Final thoughts…

Students (all people actually) do things for their reasons, not ours.

Information without emotion is rarely retained. And information rarely changes behavior.

Be mindful of how you can add the greatest value to students who could benefit from changed habits. Be a change agent.



Let me here from you. What are strategies you’ve used to help student’s make pivotal changes? I’m talking about real, lasting change. Share a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. I look forward to hearing your thoughts. 

Read More What’s the Key to Influencing Your Students?



When you think about your students, what stories are you telling yourself about them? I’ve been guilty of buying into limiting stories about who they are, where they come from, or what they’re capable of.



Of course, I care about all of our kids and strive to treat them all with dignity and respect. But it’s easy to see them a certain way if I’m not careful. It’s easy to make judgments. There are subtle thoughts and feelings. I might believe a story that casts some as most likely to succeed and others as at-risk or some other label.



It’s almost effortless to impose our stories on them or accept the limiting stories others believe about them without a question.



They don’t have a chance.



They’re victims of their environment.



They don’t have the right parents, the right influences, the right resources. 



They have an IEP. 



They’re low functioning.



They’re a behavior problem.



They’re lazy.



They don’t care about school.



They’ll never make it in college.



We can easily make all kinds of assumptions even without thinking. 

I’ve seen on Twitter recently the idea that we shouldn’t judge a student by the chapter of their story we walk in on. That is a powerful thought. So true! We all know people who’ve had difficult back stories who were probably judged as incapable or unlikely to succeed.



And yet, they made it.



Some famous examples include Albert Einstein, Oprah Winfrey, J.K. Rowling, Walt Disney, Abraham Lincoln and many others. Not only did they make, they became world changers.



I’m gonna try harder to never tell myself a story about a kid that says they can’t because of where they live, what kind of home they come from, the trauma they’ve experienced, or anything else that limits their possibilities.



Things that have been true in the past don’t have to be true for the future. Alan Cohen writes “our history is not our destiny.”



As educators, we cannot buy into the idea that because a kid comes from the wrong side of the tracks, lacks resources, or has a difficult home environment they have limited capacity.



As I wrote in Future Driven

Treat all of your students like future world changers. I know there are some who are difficult, disrespectful, and disengaged. But don’t let that place limits on what they might accomplish someday. Believe in their possibilities and build on their strengths.

Kids can overcome any obstacle placed in their way. Don’t believe it? How can you know what might be possible with effort, enthusiasm, and continuous learning? 



And when no one else in the world is seeing a kid for the genius of what’s inside them, it’s time for educators to step up and be the ones who find that spark. 



No limits. No excuses.



What story are you telling yourself? What story are you believing about yourself? What story are you believing about your students?



The culture on the inside of your school must be stronger than the culture on the outside. There are so many outside voices telling kids what they can’t do, and it’s no wonder that kids start to believe it.



Every school needs every adult who works there to believe in the possibilities of their students, who will push them to greatness every day, who show them how to reach higher and go further. They may have limits crashing down on them from the external realities they live with, but we can help unleash the greatness they have within them. We can help them overcome and break through the limits.



What are specific ways we can help students realize they have greatness within? How can we unleash the potential they have to pursue their unlimited capacity? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More What Story Are You Telling Yourself?



When you think about your students, what stories are you telling yourself about them? I’ve been guilty of buying into limiting stories about who they are, where they come from, or what they’re capable of.



Of course, I care about all of our kids and strive to treat them all with dignity and respect. But it’s easy to see them a certain way if I’m not careful. It’s easy to make judgments. There are subtle thoughts and feelings. I might believe a story that casts some as most likely to succeed and others as at-risk or some other label.



It’s almost effortless to impose our stories on them or accept the limiting stories others believe about them without a question.



They don’t have a chance.



They’re victims of their environment.



They don’t have the right parents, the right influences, the right resources. 



They have an IEP. 



They’re low functioning.



They’re a behavior problem.



They’re lazy.



They don’t care about school.



They’ll never make it in college.



We can easily make all kinds of assumptions even without thinking. 

I’ve seen on Twitter recently the idea that we shouldn’t judge a student by the chapter of their story we walk in on. That is a powerful thought. So true! We all know people who’ve had difficult back stories who were probably judged as incapable or unlikely to succeed.



And yet, they made it.



Some famous examples include Albert Einstein, Oprah Winfrey, J.K. Rowling, Walt Disney, Abraham Lincoln and many others. Not only did they make, they became world changers.



I’m gonna try harder to never tell myself a story about a kid that says they can’t because of where they live, what kind of home they come from, the trauma they’ve experienced, or anything else that limits their possibilities.



Things that have been true in the past don’t have to be true for the future. Alan Cohen writes “our history is not our destiny.”



As educators, we cannot buy into the idea that because a kid comes from the wrong side of the tracks, lacks resources, or has a difficult home environment they have limited capacity.



As I wrote in Future Driven

Treat all of your students like future world changers. I know there are some who are difficult, disrespectful, and disengaged. But don’t let that place limits on what they might accomplish someday. Believe in their possibilities and build on their strengths.

Kids can overcome any obstacle placed in their way. Don’t believe it? How can you know what might be possible with effort, enthusiasm, and continuous learning? 



And when no one else in the world is seeing a kid for the genius of what’s inside them, it’s time for educators to step up and be the ones who find that spark. 



No limits. No excuses.



What story are you telling yourself? What story are you believing about yourself? What story are you believing about your students?



The culture on the inside of your school must be stronger than the culture on the outside. There are so many outside voices telling kids what they can’t do, and it’s no wonder that kids start to believe it.



Every school needs every adult who works there to believe in the possibilities of their students, who will push them to greatness every day, who show them how to reach higher and go further. They may have limits crashing down on them from the external realities they live with, but we can help unleash the greatness they have within them. We can help them overcome and break through the limits.



What are specific ways we can help students realize they have greatness within? How can we unleash the potential they have to pursue their unlimited capacity? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More What Story Are You Telling Yourself?



When you think about your students, what stories are you telling yourself about them? I’ve been guilty of buying into limiting stories about who they are, where they come from, or what they’re capable of.



Of course, I care about all of our kids and strive to treat them all with dignity and respect. But it’s easy to see them a certain way if I’m not careful. It’s easy to make judgments. There are subtle thoughts and feelings. I might believe a story that casts some as most likely to succeed and others as at-risk or some other label.



It’s almost effortless to impose our stories on them or accept the limiting stories others believe about them without a question.



They don’t have a chance.



They’re victims of their environment.



They don’t have the right parents, the right influences, the right resources. 



They have an IEP. 



They’re low functioning.



They’re a behavior problem.



They’re lazy.



They don’t care about school.



They’ll never make it in college.



We can easily make all kinds of assumptions even without thinking. 

I’ve seen on Twitter recently the idea that we shouldn’t judge a student by the chapter of their story we walk in on. That is a powerful thought. So true! We all know people who’ve had difficult back stories who were probably judged as incapable or unlikely to succeed.



And yet, they made it.



Some famous examples include Albert Einstein, Oprah Winfrey, J.K. Rowling, Walt Disney, Abraham Lincoln and many others. Not only did they make, they became world changers.



I’m gonna try harder to never tell myself a story about a kid that says they can’t because of where they live, what kind of home they come from, the trauma they’ve experienced, or anything else that limits their possibilities.



Things that have been true in the past don’t have to be true for the future. Alan Cohen writes “our history is not our destiny.”



As educators, we cannot buy into the idea that because a kid comes from the wrong side of the tracks, lacks resources, or has a difficult home environment they have limited capacity.



As I wrote in Future Driven

Treat all of your students like future world changers. I know there are some who are difficult, disrespectful, and disengaged. But don’t let that place limits on what they might accomplish someday. Believe in their possibilities and build on their strengths.

Kids can overcome any obstacle placed in their way. Don’t believe it? How can you know what might be possible with effort, enthusiasm, and continuous learning? 



And when no one else in the world is seeing a kid for the genius of what’s inside them, it’s time for educators to step up and be the ones who find that spark. 



No limits. No excuses.



What story are you telling yourself? What story are you believing about yourself? What story are you believing about your students?



The culture on the inside of your school must be stronger than the culture on the outside. There are so many outside voices telling kids what they can’t do, and it’s no wonder that kids start to believe it.



Every school needs every adult who works there to believe in the possibilities of their students, who will push them to greatness every day, who show them how to reach higher and go further. They may have limits crashing down on them from the external realities they live with, but we can help unleash the greatness they have within them. We can help them overcome and break through the limits.



What are specific ways we can help students realize they have greatness within? How can we unleash the potential they have to pursue their unlimited capacity? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

      

Read More What Story Are You Telling Yourself?



When you think about your students, what stories are you telling yourself about them? I’ve been guilty of buying into limiting stories about who they are, where they come from, or what they’re capable of.



Of course, I care about all of our kids and strive to treat them all with dignity and respect. But it’s easy to see them a certain way if I’m not careful. It’s easy to make judgments. There are subtle thoughts and feelings. I might believe a story that casts some as most likely to succeed and others as at-risk or some other label.



It’s almost effortless to impose our stories on them or accept the limiting stories others believe about them without a question.



They don’t have a chance.



They’re victims of their environment.



They don’t have the right parents, the right influences, the right resources. 



They have an IEP. 



They’re low functioning.



They’re a behavior problem.



They’re lazy.



They don’t care about school.



They’ll never make it in college.



We can easily make all kinds of assumptions even without thinking. 

I’ve seen on Twitter recently the idea that we shouldn’t judge a student by the chapter of their story we walk in on. That is a powerful thought. So true! We all know people who’ve had difficult back stories who were probably judged as incapable or unlikely to succeed.



And yet, they made it.



Some famous examples include Albert Einstein, Oprah Winfrey, J.K. Rowling, Walt Disney, Abraham Lincoln and many others. Not only did they make, they became world changers.



I’m gonna try harder to never tell myself a story about a kid that says they can’t because of where they live, what kind of home they come from, the trauma they’ve experienced, or anything else that limits their possibilities.



Things that have been true in the past don’t have to be true for the future. Alan Cohen writes “our history is not our destiny.”



As educators, we cannot buy into the idea that because a kid comes from the wrong side of the tracks, lacks resources, or has a difficult home environment they have limited capacity.



As I wrote in Future Driven

Treat all of your students like future world changers. I know there are some who are difficult, disrespectful, and disengaged. But don’t let that place limits on what they might accomplish someday. Believe in their possibilities and build on their strengths.

Kids can overcome any obstacle placed in their way. Don’t believe it? How can you know what might be possible with effort, enthusiasm, and continuous learning? 



And when no one else in the world is seeing a kid for the genius of what’s inside them, it’s time for educators to step up and be the ones who find that spark. 



No limits. No excuses.



What story are you telling yourself? What story are you believing about yourself? What story are you believing about your students?



The culture on the inside of your school must be stronger than the culture on the outside. There are so many outside voices telling kids what they can’t do, and it’s no wonder that kids start to believe it.



Every school needs every adult who works there to believe in the possibilities of their students, who will push them to greatness every day, who show them how to reach higher and go further. They may have limits crashing down on them from the external realities they live with, but we can help unleash the greatness they have within them. We can help them overcome and break through the limits.



What are specific ways we can help students realize they have greatness within? How can we unleash the potential they have to pursue their unlimited capacity? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

      

Read More What Story Are You Telling Yourself?



Daniel Pink wrote about purpose in his best-seller, Drive. He said there are three things that motivate creative peopleautonomy, mastery, and purpose. If we want to create a highly motivating environment in our schools, that also values creativity, it won’t happen by control and compliance or rewards and punishments. 



It will only happen when we provide opportunities for meaningful work, both for teachers and students. We should always be concerned with cultivating meaningful work.



A sense of purpose gives the work relevance. I wonder what most kids think about the purpose for coming to school. It’s mandatory. It’s required. It’s how I can get into college and get a good job someday. My parents make me. It’s important to my parents. At least I see my friends there. The purpose is to get good grades, perhaps? It’s something to be endured. Yikes!



I wonder what would happen if we really focused on helping students find deeper meaning and purpose in their school experience? What if we intentionally helped students find purpose and meaning in learning? Why isn’t that a class we offer? Actually it should be part of every class. Sometimes I think the most important things are completely overlooked.



If school elicited a stronger sense of purpose, what benefits would we see? Here are 7 characteristics of people with purpose. I’m sure there are high-purpose people in your school. I just think we need more of them for sure.



1. High purpose people are willing to take more risks.



They will step out of their comfort zone to move forward because they have a reason to be bold. They know their why. They see the importance of what they’re doing and want to make a difference. Ultimately, risk takers learn more because they don’t retreat from challenges.



2. They’re open to new possibilities.



Most people see problems. And they want conventional solutions. But people with purpose see possibilities. They don’t let problems hold them back. When some people see challenges and obstacles, people with purpose look for opportunities to move forward and learn and grow. 



3. They have more energy and emotion about what they’re doing.



People with high purpose have passion for what they’re doing. They are deeply committed. They are intellectually connected to what they’re doing, but they’re also emotionally connected. They also feel it. They feel passion for their purpose.



4. They have no time for petty disputes or social drama.



Ever wonder how people can get distracted by petty disputes or social drama? It’s lack of purpose. People who are mission focused won’t allow themselves to drift from what’s most important. 



5. They’re intentional.



High purpose people aren’t just going through the motions. Every day is valuable. The wake up determined and go to bed satisfied. They have important work to do. They want to grow and see progress.



6. They don’t allow limits and naysayers to hold them back.



People who lack purpose get very uncomfortable around people with strong purpose. They may even mock their efforts and say it can’t be done or point out the obstacles standing in the way. But people with purpose don’t let these people bring them down. They just try to bring them along. 



7. They’re willing to make repeated efforts.



People who lack purpose may try for a moment or a day. But they quickly get discouraged. They want results, but they don’t want to grind. They aren’t committed enough to the purpose to apply effort consistently until the mission is accomplished. The goal is too important to give up just because it’s hard.



What’s your purpose? You might consider writing a personal mission statement to clarify what drives you to do great work. What gives your life direction? Let me know your thoughts on creating a stronger sense of purpose for educators and students. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter

Read More 7 Characteristics of People with a Strong Sense of Purpose



Daniel Pink wrote about purpose in his best-seller, Drive. He said there are three things that motivate creative peopleautonomy, mastery, and purpose. If we want to create a highly motivating environment in our schools, that also values creativity, it won’t happen by control and compliance or rewards and punishments. 



It will only happen when we provide opportunities for meaningful work, both for teachers and students. We should always be concerned with cultivating meaningful work.



A sense of purpose gives the work relevance. I wonder what most kids think about the purpose for coming to school. It’s mandatory. It’s required. It’s how I can get into college and get a good job someday. My parents make me. It’s important to my parents. At least I see my friends there. The purpose is to get good grades, perhaps? It’s something to be endured. Yikes!



I wonder what would happen if we really focused on helping students find deeper meaning and purpose in their school experience? What if we intentionally helped students find purpose and meaning in learning? Why isn’t that a class we offer? Actually it should be part of every class. Sometimes I think the most important things are completely overlooked.



If school elicited a stronger sense of purpose, what benefits would we see? Here are 7 characteristics of people with purpose. I’m sure there are high-purpose people in your school. I just think we need more of them for sure.



1. High purpose people are willing to take more risks.



They will step out of their comfort zone to move forward because they have a reason to be bold. They know their why. They see the importance of what they’re doing and want to make a difference. Ultimately, risk takers learn more because they don’t retreat from challenges.



2. They’re open to new possibilities.



Most people see problems. And they want conventional solutions. But people with purpose see possibilities. They don’t let problems hold them back. When some people see challenges and obstacles, people with purpose look for opportunities to move forward and learn and grow. 



3. They have more energy and emotion about what they’re doing.



People with high purpose have passion for what they’re doing. They are deeply committed. They are intellectually connected to what they’re doing, but they’re also emotionally connected. They also feel it. They feel passion for their purpose.



4. They have no time for petty disputes or social drama.



Ever wonder how people can get distracted by petty disputes or social drama? It’s lack of purpose. People who are mission focused won’t allow themselves to drift from what’s most important. 



5. They’re intentional.



High purpose people aren’t just going through the motions. Every day is valuable. The wake up determined and go to bed satisfied. They have important work to do. They want to grow and see progress.



6. They don’t allow limits and naysayers to hold them back.



People who lack purpose get very uncomfortable around people with strong purpose. They may even mock their efforts and say it can’t be done or point out the obstacles standing in the way. But people with purpose don’t let these people bring them down. They just try to bring them along. 



7. They’re willing to make repeated efforts.



People who lack purpose may try for a moment or a day. But they quickly get discouraged. They want results, but they don’t want to grind. They aren’t committed enough to the purpose to apply effort consistently until the mission is accomplished. The goal is too important to give up just because it’s hard.



What’s your purpose? You might consider writing a personal mission statement to clarify what drives you to do great work. What gives your life direction? Let me know your thoughts on creating a stronger sense of purpose for educators and students. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter

Read More 7 Characteristics of People with a Strong Sense of Purpose



Daniel Pink wrote about purpose in his best-seller, Drive. He said there are three things that motivate creative peopleautonomy, mastery, and purpose. If we want to create a highly motivating environment in our schools, that also values creativity, it won’t happen by control and compliance or rewards and punishments. 



It will only happen when we provide opportunities for meaningful work, both for teachers and students. We should always be concerned with cultivating meaningful work.



A sense of purpose gives the work relevance. I wonder what most kids think about the purpose for coming to school. It’s mandatory. It’s required. It’s how I can get into college and get a good job someday. My parents make me. It’s important to my parents. At least I see my friends there. The purpose is to get good grades, perhaps? It’s something to be endured. Yikes!



I wonder what would happen if we really focused on helping students find deeper meaning and purpose in their school experience? What if we intentionally helped students find purpose and meaning in learning? Why isn’t that a class we offer? Actually it should be part of every class. Sometimes I think the most important things are completely overlooked.



If school elicited a stronger sense of purpose, what benefits would we see? Here are 7 characteristics of people with purpose. I’m sure there are high-purpose people in your school. I just think we need more of them for sure.



1. High purpose people are willing to take more risks.



They will step out of their comfort zone to move forward because they have a reason to be bold. They know their why. They see the importance of what they’re doing and want to make a difference. Ultimately, risk takers learn more because they don’t retreat from challenges.



2. They’re open to new possibilities.



Most people see problems. And they want conventional solutions. But people with purpose see possibilities. They don’t let problems hold them back. When some people see challenges and obstacles, people with purpose look for opportunities to move forward and learn and grow. 



3. They have more energy and emotion about what they’re doing.



People with high purpose have passion for what they’re doing. They are deeply committed. They are intellectually connected to what they’re doing, but they’re also emotionally connected. They also feel it. They feel passion for their purpose.



4. They have no time for petty disputes or social drama.



Ever wonder how people can get distracted by petty disputes or social drama? It’s lack of purpose. People who are mission focused won’t allow themselves to drift from what’s most important. 



5. They’re intentional.



High purpose people aren’t just going through the motions. Every day is valuable. The wake up determined and go to bed satisfied. They have important work to do. They want to grow and see progress.



6. They don’t allow limits and naysayers to hold them back.



People who lack purpose get very uncomfortable around people with strong purpose. They may even mock their efforts and say it can’t be done or point out the obstacles standing in the way. But people with purpose don’t let these people bring them down. They just try to bring them along. 



7. They’re willing to make repeated efforts.



People who lack purpose may try for a moment or a day. But they quickly get discouraged. They want results, but they don’t want to grind. They aren’t committed enough to the purpose to apply effort consistently until the mission is accomplished. The goal is too important to give up just because it’s hard.



What’s your purpose? You might consider writing a personal mission statement to clarify what drives you to do great work. What gives your life direction? Let me know your thoughts on creating a stronger sense of purpose for educators and students. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter

      

Read More 7 Characteristics of People with a Strong Sense of Purpose



Daniel Pink wrote about purpose in his best-seller, Drive. He said there are three things that motivate creative peopleautonomy, mastery, and purpose. If we want to create a highly motivating environment in our schools, that also values creativity, it won’t happen by control and compliance or rewards and punishments. 



It will only happen when we provide opportunities for meaningful work, both for teachers and students. We should always be concerned with cultivating meaningful work.



A sense of purpose gives the work relevance. I wonder what most kids think about the purpose for coming to school. It’s mandatory. It’s required. It’s how I can get into college and get a good job someday. My parents make me. It’s important to my parents. At least I see my friends there. The purpose is to get good grades, perhaps? It’s something to be endured. Yikes!



I wonder what would happen if we really focused on helping students find deeper meaning and purpose in their school experience? What if we intentionally helped students find purpose and meaning in learning? Why isn’t that a class we offer? Actually it should be part of every class. Sometimes I think the most important things are completely overlooked.



If school elicited a stronger sense of purpose, what benefits would we see? Here are 7 characteristics of people with purpose. I’m sure there are high-purpose people in your school. I just think we need more of them for sure.



1. High purpose people are willing to take more risks.



They will step out of their comfort zone to move forward because they have a reason to be bold. They know their why. They see the importance of what they’re doing and want to make a difference. Ultimately, risk takers learn more because they don’t retreat from challenges.



2. They’re open to new possibilities.



Most people see problems. And they want conventional solutions. But people with purpose see possibilities. They don’t let problems hold them back. When some people see challenges and obstacles, people with purpose look for opportunities to move forward and learn and grow. 



3. They have more energy and emotion about what they’re doing.



People with high purpose have passion for what they’re doing. They are deeply committed. They are intellectually connected to what they’re doing, but they’re also emotionally connected. They also feel it. They feel passion for their purpose.



4. They have no time for petty disputes or social drama.



Ever wonder how people can get distracted by petty disputes or social drama? It’s lack of purpose. People who are mission focused won’t allow themselves to drift from what’s most important. 



5. They’re intentional.



High purpose people aren’t just going through the motions. Every day is valuable. The wake up determined and go to bed satisfied. They have important work to do. They want to grow and see progress.



6. They don’t allow limits and naysayers to hold them back.



People who lack purpose get very uncomfortable around people with strong purpose. They may even mock their efforts and say it can’t be done or point out the obstacles standing in the way. But people with purpose don’t let these people bring them down. They just try to bring them along. 



7. They’re willing to make repeated efforts.



People who lack purpose may try for a moment or a day. But they quickly get discouraged. They want results, but they don’t want to grind. They aren’t committed enough to the purpose to apply effort consistently until the mission is accomplished. The goal is too important to give up just because it’s hard.



What’s your purpose? You might consider writing a personal mission statement to clarify what drives you to do great work. What gives your life direction? Let me know your thoughts on creating a stronger sense of purpose for educators and students. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter

      

Read More 7 Characteristics of People with a Strong Sense of Purpose



Strong leaders have strong visions for their schools. They feel a constant tension between how things are and how they could be. And leaders want to see progress toward the vision. And progress toward the vision is great, but it comes at a cost if leaders aren’t careful.



People must never feel diminished at the expense of the vision.



I would challenge leaders to consider this question. Why do you provide learning opportunities for your teachers? I’m guessing the most common answer would be it’s for the kids and their learning. 



That’s a noble goal, right?



It’s to help teachers be better so kids can learn more too. It’s to move the school forward toward the vision. We have important work to do to be the best we can be, so the kids can be the best they can be.



But here’s the translation for many teachers: My current work is not appreciated here. It’s never good enough. You’re always trying to squeeze more out of me. I’m doing all I can and now you’re adding to my plate. My work is not valued here. I feel like I’m being pushed in directions I don’t even know if I want to go.



But what if we approached professional learning from a different perspective? What if school leadership focused more on serving teachers and meeting their needs? What if professional learning was more about growing the teacher and not about better test scores or some other outcome?



Let’s create a culture of professional learning that values teachers. Let’s start with this idea. We want to provide experiences that help teachers get the most out of their work. We want to provide experiences that help you achieve your greatest fulfillment as a teacher. 



We want to provide experiences that offer the highest return on your investment as an educator. 



That’s servant leadership. Helping others make a greater impact and find more fulfillment in what they are doing. It’s not about squeezing more out of the individual for the sake of the school, the test scores, or even for the kids. It’s not about winning at the SMART goals game.



But those things will probably improve too as teachers feel more appreciated, find more fulfillment, and sense they are getting a higher return on their investment as an educator.



There’s nothing wrong with leaders asking more of the people they lead. That’s what good leaders do. They challenge people to grow their capacity and to use their capacity to the fullest.



But start with why. Reflect on your own motives. Why are you asking more? It has to be to care for your team. Love your team. It has to be for the benefit of each individual first. Help them reach their goals. Help them feel a greater sense of accomplishment. Give them a sense of their own talent, progress, and strengths.



The best leaders are constantly affirming the work that is being done. They are recognizing the strengths and contributions of each team member. The vision is realized as a result of valuing people, encouraging them, and supporting them all along the way.



Leaders: When we ask teachers to risk more and to give more, are we also giving more and risking more for teachers?



The vision for your school is important, but the vision is meaningless if performance is more important than people.



What are some ways you are risking more for you colleagues, caring for them, and increasing the return on investment for others? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Don’t Ask For More Until You’re Willing to Risk More



Strong leaders have strong visions for their schools. They feel a constant tension between how things are and how they could be. And leaders want to see progress toward the vision. And progress toward the vision is great, but it comes at a cost if leaders aren’t careful.



People must never feel diminished at the expense of the vision.



I would challenge leaders to consider this question. Why do you provide learning opportunities for your teachers? I’m guessing the most common answer would be it’s for the kids and their learning. 



That’s a noble goal, right?



It’s to help teachers be better so kids can learn more too. It’s to move the school forward toward the vision. We have important work to do to be the best we can be, so the kids can be the best they can be.



But here’s the translation for many teachers: My current work is not appreciated here. It’s never good enough. You’re always trying to squeeze more out of me. I’m doing all I can and now you’re adding to my plate. My work is not valued here. I feel like I’m being pushed in directions I don’t even know if I want to go.



But what if we approached professional learning from a different perspective? What if school leadership focused more on serving teachers and meeting their needs? What if professional learning was more about growing the teacher and not about better test scores or some other outcome?



Let’s create a culture of professional learning that values teachers. Let’s start with this idea. We want to provide experiences that help teachers get the most out of their work. We want to provide experiences that help you achieve your greatest fulfillment as a teacher. 



We want to provide experiences that offer the highest return on your investment as an educator. 



That’s servant leadership. Helping others make a greater impact and find more fulfillment in what they are doing. It’s not about squeezing more out of the individual for the sake of the school, the test scores, or even for the kids. It’s not about winning at the SMART goals game.



But those things will probably improve too as teachers feel more appreciated, find more fulfillment, and sense they are getting a higher return on their investment as an educator.



There’s nothing wrong with leaders asking more of the people they lead. That’s what good leaders do. They challenge people to grow their capacity and to use their capacity to the fullest.



But start with why. Reflect on your own motives. Why are you asking more? It has to be to care for your team. Love your team. It has to be for the benefit of each individual first. Help them reach their goals. Help them feel a greater sense of accomplishment. Give them a sense of their own talent, progress, and strengths.



The best leaders are constantly affirming the work that is being done. They are recognizing the strengths and contributions of each team member. The vision is realized as a result of valuing people, encouraging them, and supporting them all along the way.



Leaders: When we ask teachers to risk more and to give more, are we also giving more and risking more for teachers?



The vision for your school is important, but the vision is meaningless if performance is more important than people.



What are some ways you are risking more for you colleagues, caring for them, and increasing the return on investment for others? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Don’t Ask For More Until You’re Willing to Risk More



Strong leaders have strong visions for their schools. They feel a constant tension between how things are and how they could be. And leaders want to see progress toward the vision. And progress toward the vision is great, but it comes at a cost if leaders aren’t careful.



People must never feel diminished at the expense of the vision.



I would challenge leaders to consider this question. Why do you provide learning opportunities for your teachers? I’m guessing the most common answer would be it’s for the kids and their learning. 



That’s a noble goal, right?



It’s to help teachers be better so kids can learn more too. It’s to move the school forward toward the vision. We have important work to do to be the best we can be, so the kids can be the best they can be.



But here’s the translation for many teachers: My current work is not appreciated here. It’s never good enough. You’re always trying to squeeze more out of me. I’m doing all I can and now you’re adding to my plate. My work is not valued here. I feel like I’m being pushed in directions I don’t even know if I want to go.



But what if we approached professional learning from a different perspective? What if school leadership focused more on serving teachers and meeting their needs? What if professional learning was more about growing the teacher and not about better test scores or some other outcome?



Let’s create a culture of professional learning that values teachers. Let’s start with this idea. We want to provide experiences that help teachers get the most out of their work. We want to provide experiences that help you achieve your greatest fulfillment as a teacher. 



We want to provide experiences that offer the highest return on your investment as an educator. 



That’s servant leadership. Helping others make a greater impact and find more fulfillment in what they are doing. It’s not about squeezing more out of the individual for the sake of the school, the test scores, or even for the kids. It’s not about winning at the SMART goals game.



But those things will probably improve too as teachers feel more appreciated, find more fulfillment, and sense they are getting a higher return on their investment as an educator.



There’s nothing wrong with leaders asking more of the people they lead. That’s what good leaders do. They challenge people to grow their capacity and to use their capacity to the fullest.



But start with why. Reflect on your own motives. Why are you asking more? It has to be to care for your team. Love your team. It has to be for the benefit of each individual first. Help them reach their goals. Help them feel a greater sense of accomplishment. Give them a sense of their own talent, progress, and strengths.



The best leaders are constantly affirming the work that is being done. They are recognizing the strengths and contributions of each team member. The vision is realized as a result of valuing people, encouraging them, and supporting them all along the way.



Leaders: When we ask teachers to risk more and to give more, are we also giving more and risking more for teachers?



The vision for your school is important, but the vision is meaningless if performance is more important than people.



What are some ways you are risking more for you colleagues, caring for them, and increasing the return on investment for others? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

      

Read More Don’t Ask For More Until You’re Willing to Risk More



Strong leaders have strong visions for their schools. They feel a constant tension between how things are and how they could be. And leaders want to see progress toward the vision. And progress toward the vision is great, but it comes at a cost if leaders aren’t careful.



People must never feel diminished at the expense of the vision.



I would challenge leaders to consider this question. Why do you provide learning opportunities for your teachers? I’m guessing the most common answer would be it’s for the kids and their learning. 



That’s a noble goal, right?



It’s to help teachers be better so kids can learn more too. It’s to move the school forward toward the vision. We have important work to do to be the best we can be, so the kids can be the best they can be.



But here’s the translation for many teachers: My current work is not appreciated here. It’s never good enough. You’re always trying to squeeze more out of me. I’m doing all I can and now you’re adding to my plate. My work is not valued here. I feel like I’m being pushed in directions I don’t even know if I want to go.



But what if we approached professional learning from a different perspective? What if school leadership focused more on serving teachers and meeting their needs? What if professional learning was more about growing the teacher and not about better test scores or some other outcome?



Let’s create a culture of professional learning that values teachers. Let’s start with this idea. We want to provide experiences that help teachers get the most out of their work. We want to provide experiences that help you achieve your greatest fulfillment as a teacher. 



We want to provide experiences that offer the highest return on your investment as an educator. 



That’s servant leadership. Helping others make a greater impact and find more fulfillment in what they are doing. It’s not about squeezing more out of the individual for the sake of the school, the test scores, or even for the kids. It’s not about winning at the SMART goals game.



But those things will probably improve too as teachers feel more appreciated, find more fulfillment, and sense they are getting a higher return on their investment as an educator.



There’s nothing wrong with leaders asking more of the people they lead. That’s what good leaders do. They challenge people to grow their capacity and to use their capacity to the fullest.



But start with why. Reflect on your own motives. Why are you asking more? It has to be to care for your team. Love your team. It has to be for the benefit of each individual first. Help them reach their goals. Help them feel a greater sense of accomplishment. Give them a sense of their own talent, progress, and strengths.



The best leaders are constantly affirming the work that is being done. They are recognizing the strengths and contributions of each team member. The vision is realized as a result of valuing people, encouraging them, and supporting them all along the way.



Leaders: When we ask teachers to risk more and to give more, are we also giving more and risking more for teachers?



The vision for your school is important, but the vision is meaningless if performance is more important than people.



What are some ways you are risking more for you colleagues, caring for them, and increasing the return on investment for others? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

      

Read More Don’t Ask For More Until You’re Willing to Risk More





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations and make sure they are clear.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

      

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

      

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

      

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.