Tag: Understanding and Responding to the Larger Societal Context

Here is something I hear often; “Are we creating a system of education where a student will come out and become the next Steve Jobs?” Let’s unpack that. Steve Jobs, a fantastic entrepreneur, businessperson, intelligent mind, and innovator.  But there is only one Steve Jobs, and I dare say that there will never be another … [Read more…]

Read More The Next “You”

  If Blockbuster was still around today, and you had to take out your life savings and invest in that company or Netflix, which one would you choose? The answer is obvious. But what about five years ago? Ten years ago? Now it would be easy to say that Netflix would be the obvious choice, … [Read more…]

Read More “We call them leaders because they go first.”

When I was 15 or 16 years old, my mom talked to me about moving from the small town that we lived in at the time (Humboldt, Saskatchewan) to a larger city (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan), as my parents were looking at some business opportunities.  Being the stubborn teenager I was at the time and being fully … [Read more…]

Read More Making Choices for Our Children

I wrote about the idea of “Innovating Inside of the Box” in “The Innovator’s Mindset.” Here is what I shared: Let’s not kid ourselves. In education, especially the public sector, schools are not overloaded with funding. Innovating in our schools requires a different type of thinking, one that doesn’t focus on ideas that are “outside … [Read more…]

Read More Why “Innovating Inside the Box” is Crucial

One of my goals for 2018 is to read more books.  I read a ton of articles, but I have slacked off on the number of books that I have read in the last two years.  The balance I want to find is reading books that are new, but also non-fiction classics. I am trying … [Read more…]

Read More The Risks in What We Don’t Do

I am embarrassed to admit it, but I do like the clickbaity type titles more often than I should.  When I saw the title, “The 1 Interview Question All Great Bosses Ask to Hire for Potential (Hint: Mark Cuban Says It’s the Secret to Success),” I was interested in reading it just because I thought … [Read more…]

Read More The Importance of “Sales” in Education

I read a comment regarding how many educators often look at business for ideas on education and how we shouldn’t because they are two separate entities. Although the second part is correct, I believe that looking at what happens in the business world is beneficial to educators if they are open to learning from the … [Read more…]

Read More Learning Everywhere, Anywhere, and From Anyone

I saw the title of this article, “Are Parent-Teacher Conferences Becoming Obsolete?“, and was surprised the direction.  I was expecting the article to talk about moving away from the “traditional parent conference” (sitting around for 10-20 minutes talking about a child’s experience in school) to something more student-led.  Instead, it shared how a parent portal … [Read more…]

Read More So Much More Than Letters and Numbers

In an awesome conversation last night with Patrick Larkin and Katie Martin, Patrick was sharing some of the things that they have done in their district in the previous several years.  One of the stories that resonated with me was how when they moved forward with going one-to-one, they asked students for feedback on what … [Read more…]

Read More Find a Way or Find Someone Who Has Found a Way

Two things stuck out to me this week… One was that I had the opportunity to work with students on how they use social media and tried to help them focus on “what’s possible,” not on what you shouldn’t do.  When I was introduced at one of the school’s this week, it was announced that … [Read more…]

Read More Change the World or Simply Maintain It?

I recently heard this term called, “Occam’s Razor”, and I found it quite interesting: Occam’s razor is a principle first developed by the Franciscan friar and philosopher, William of Ockham. Whilst it is likely that the philosophy was posthumously attributed to him, as it was based upon common medieval philosophy, it seems to be a … [Read more…]

Read More Education Decision Making Flowchart

The perception of what “innovation” is seems to be a barrier in many circumstances in embracing the idea.  In “The Innovator’s Mindset“, I use the following definition: Innovation is a common term in many educational circles today and has been used a number of times in this book already. But what does it actually mean—especially … [Read more…]

Read More Innovate Forward

From the article, “5 Unusual Facts About Google’s Odd (and Wildly Successful) Management Practices“(read the whole thing): 5. When hiring, high GPAs and test scores don’t matter Relying heavily on data crunching, Bock told The New York Times a few years back that GPAs and test scores are worthless as a criteria for hiring, unless you’re an … [Read more…]

Read More Looking Beyond the Score

From the article, “5 Unusual Facts About Google’s Odd (and Wildly Successful) Management Practices“(read the whole thing): 5. When hiring, high GPAs and test scores don’t matter Relying heavily on data crunching, Bock told The New York Times a few years back that GPAs and test scores are worthless as a criteria for hiring, unless you’re an … [Read more…]

Read More Looking Beyond the Score

When I first started putting this blog/portfolio together in 2010, I wanted to think of a name for it. To some, the title of their blog is something that has actually held them back from starting it in the first place. They have great ideas but they can’t find that “perfect” title.  It is kind … [Read more…]

Read More The Science Behind Stories and Anecdotes

When I first started putting this blog/portfolio together in 2010, I wanted to think of a name for it. To some, the title of their blog is something that has actually held them back from starting it in the first place. They have great ideas but they can’t find that “perfect” title.  It is kind … [Read more…]

Read More The Science Behind Stories and Anecdotes

This: “True literacy is always a two-way transaction. We don’t just consume; we produce. We don’t just read; we write. The ability to receive information is always the first part of the literacy equation that is necessary for the masses, and then the ability to express information generally follows, as we strive to quench our … [Read more…]

Read More “True literacy is always a two-way transaction.”

I ask you a question. You are unsure of the answer, so you google it, tweet out if anyone has an answer, or use a plethora of resources that are at your fingertips. You find an answer and I call you resourceful.  I ask the student the same question, and they use your same approach you just … [Read more…]

Read More Knowledge vs. Access to Knowledge