Tag: Twitter





There’s been some push back recently on Twitter against the whole idea of positive attitude as a good thing. It gave me some things to think about, because in general, I’ve found a positive mindset to be a source of strength in my life. I’ve even written several posts about positive thinking, including this one:

10 Thoughts On Positive Attitude to Share With Your Team

A positive school is built on positive moments. It doesn’t just happen by accident. Every interaction counts. It takes a concerted effort on the part of everyone to create an environment that is awesome. So what are some things everyone should know to be more positive in their own mindset and help contribute to that positive environment we all want?

How could someone not be in favor of having a positive outlook? I was curious and a little puzzled by some of the responses I’ve seen to the idea of having a positive attitude. I wanted to know more.



So here are some of the arguments I’ve seen. Keep in mind I’m doing my best to synthesize, so if you’re in the anti-positive thinking camp, let me know if I’m missing the point.



1. Calls for a positive attitude are one way the dominant culture silences critics and those with opposing viewpoints. By asking me to have a positive attitude, you are refusing to acknowledge my experience and my suffering. I’m not allowed to speak my mind or share my experience without being labeled a negative person.



2. Positive thinking is not the solution to mental health issues. To the contrary, it’s part of the mental health crisis. It’s no longer okay to feel negative emotions like sadness, fear, isolation, hopelessness, or anger. If you feel those emotions, you’re not being positive, and that’s not okay.  The pressure to feel positive all the time is too much, and so when I don’t, I feel further devalued and unable to measure up.



3. Sharing positive thoughts is empty of meaning. It’s not doing the real work of challenging injustice or working to understand those who are oppressed or those who are suffering. Instead of sharing something “positive,” share something that demands justice or calls out oppressive forces. In other words, raise some hell to demand change. That’s doing something positive.



I think those are some really good reasons to push back against positive thinking, if you define and understand being positive in a certain way. I think there are some nuances to the idea of being positive that are important for the idea to work, otherwise it’s just a thought that we should all be happy all the time, and that’s just not helpful.



Here’s how I would respond to the three concerns about positive thinking.



1. Being positive doesn’t mean everyone has to be agreeable and have the same opinions. But it does mean we express our opinions in ways that are productive and helpful. In a school, leaders need to encourage productive conflict and invite critical dialogue. I want people around me to push my thinking and challenge my ideas. That’s how we get better. 



But I’m guessing…in some cases, leaders are silencing voices who are simply expressing a different viewpoint and using positive attitude as the reason. Either you agree with me or you obviously don’t have a positive attitude? It’s one or the other. That type of thinking is not effective.



2. Being positive doesn’t mean you’re happy all the time. I think believing you should be happy all the time does result in complications to mental health. We need to feel all our feelings, the positive and negative ones. The truth is none of our feeling are truly negative. They’re not bad. They’re just feelings. They come and go. And as humans, all of them are legitimate. Being positive is the ability to experience the array of human emotions and respond to them in ways that are helpful. 



In response to every emotion, we have the choice in what we do with it. How do we hold that emotion in our mind and how do we think about it? Do we listen to what our emotions tell us and let them take us down whatever path they choose? Or, do we choose the path for our emotions? Do we point them in a direction we want them to go? We’re not repressing them or denying them. It’s important to fully acknowledge how we feel, but then choose to use that emotion as fuel to go in some positive direction in life. I’m going to use this pain or sorrow for good in this certain way.



Of course, this is always a process. There are times I do not handle my emotions in productive ways. And that results in strain on my relationships or sticky situations as a leader. I’ve often had to apologize for times I allowed my emotions to choose the path.



3. Sharing positive thoughts are empty of meaning if they are empty of meaning. But they don’t have to be. In fact, the person who can communicate difficult, hard truths in a positive way is a wise person. There is wisdom and strength in communicating a difficult message in a way that doesn’t offend or alienate. That’s making an effort to have dialogue and not a shouting match. I see no benefit to a shouting match. Neither side is really listening. Nothing productive is resulting from this exchange.



And yet, that is how most people seem to be handling conversations these days in regard to our most pressing issues. It’s evident all over social media. There is no dialogue. There is no civility. Each side hurls insults, snide remarks, insulting labels, and believes they have the moral high ground. Our way is the right way!!!



It makes me sad when I see educators fall into this same type of behavior. Unfortunately, I’ve noticed more destructive posts like this recently from educators. We have an obligation to set a good example for our students every day in our classrooms, and also on social media. We have an obligation to do our very best, all the time, to be respectful and positive with our words and actions.



At the same time, it’s never okay to silence an opposing viewpoint on the grounds that the person needs to be positive. It’s okay to ask someone to communicate respectfully. But it’s not okay to silence someone who disagrees.



Let me know your thoughts on all of this. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. I always enjoy hearing from you.

Read More Is Positivity an Excuse for Silencing Opposing Viewpoints?





There’s been some push back recently on Twitter against the whole idea of positive attitude as a good thing. It gave me some things to think about, because in general, I’ve found a positive mindset to be a source of strength in my life. I’ve even written several posts about positive thinking, including this one:

10 Thoughts On Positive Attitude to Share With Your Team

A positive school is built on positive moments. It doesn’t just happen by accident. Every interaction counts. It takes a concerted effort on the part of everyone to create an environment that is awesome. So what are some things everyone should know to be more positive in their own mindset and help contribute to that positive environment we all want?

How could someone not be in favor of having a positive outlook? I was curious and a little puzzled by some of the responses I’ve seen to the idea of having a positive attitude. I wanted to know more.



So here are some of the arguments I’ve seen. Keep in mind I’m doing my best to synthesize, so if you’re in the anti-positive thinking camp, let me know if I’m missing the point.



1. Calls for a positive attitude are one way the dominant culture silences critics and those with opposing viewpoints. By asking me to have a positive attitude, you are refusing to acknowledge my experience and my suffering. I’m not allowed to speak my mind or share my experience without being labeled a negative person.



2. Positive thinking is not the solution to mental health issues. To the contrary, it’s part of the mental health crisis. It’s no longer okay to feel negative emotions like sadness, fear, isolation, hopelessness, or anger. If you feel those emotions, you’re not being positive, and that’s not okay.  The pressure to feel positive all the time is too much, and so when I don’t, I feel further devalued and unable to measure up.



3. Sharing positive thoughts is empty of meaning. It’s not doing the real work of challenging injustice or working to understand those who are oppressed or those who are suffering. Instead of sharing something “positive,” share something that demands justice or calls out oppressive forces. In other words, raise some hell to demand change. That’s doing something positive.



I think those are some really good reasons to push back against positive thinking, if you define and understand being positive in a certain way. I think there are some nuances to the idea of being positive that are important for the idea to work, otherwise it’s just a thought that we should all be happy all the time, and that’s just not helpful.



Here’s how I would respond to the three concerns about positive thinking.



1. Being positive doesn’t mean everyone has to be agreeable and have the same opinions. But it does mean we express our opinions in ways that are productive and helpful. In a school, leaders need to encourage productive conflict and invite critical dialogue. I want people around me to push my thinking and challenge my ideas. That’s how we get better. 



But I’m guessing…in some cases, leaders are silencing voices who are simply expressing a different viewpoint and using positive attitude as the reason. Either you agree with me or you obviously don’t have a positive attitude? It’s one or the other. That type of thinking is not effective.



2. Being positive doesn’t mean you’re happy all the time. I think believing you should be happy all the time does result in complications to mental health. We need to feel all our feelings, the positive and negative ones. The truth is none of our feeling are truly negative. They’re not bad. They’re just feelings. They come and go. And as humans, all of them are legitimate. Being positive is the ability to experience the array of human emotions and respond to them in ways that are helpful. 



In response to every emotion, we have the choice in what we do with it. How do we hold that emotion in our mind and how do we think about it? Do we listen to what our emotions tell us and let them take us down whatever path they choose? Or, do we choose the path for our emotions? Do we point them in a direction we want them to go? We’re not repressing them or denying them. It’s important to fully acknowledge how we feel, but then choose to use that emotion as fuel to go in some positive direction in life. I’m going to use this pain or sorrow for good in this certain way.



Of course, this is always a process. There are times I do not handle my emotions in productive ways. And that results in strain on my relationships or sticky situations as a leader. I’ve often had to apologize for times I allowed my emotions to choose the path.



3. Sharing positive thoughts are empty of meaning if they are empty of meaning. But they don’t have to be. In fact, the person who can communicate difficult, hard truths in a positive way is a wise person. There is wisdom and strength in communicating a difficult message in a way that doesn’t offend or alienate. That’s making an effort to have dialogue and not a shouting match. I see no benefit to a shouting match. Neither side is really listening. Nothing productive is resulting from this exchange.



And yet, that is how most people seem to be handling conversations these days in regard to our most pressing issues. It’s evident all over social media. There is no dialogue. There is no civility. Each side hurls insults, snide remarks, insulting labels, and believes they have the moral high ground. Our way is the right way!!!



It makes me sad when I see educators fall into this same type of behavior. Unfortunately, I’ve noticed more destructive posts like this recently from educators. We have an obligation to set a good example for our students every day in our classrooms, and also on social media. We have an obligation to do our very best, all the time, to be respectful and positive with our words and actions.



At the same time, it’s never okay to silence an opposing viewpoint on the grounds that the person needs to be positive. It’s okay to ask someone to communicate respectfully. But it’s not okay to silence someone who disagrees.



Let me know your thoughts on all of this. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. I always enjoy hearing from you.

Read More Is Positivity an Excuse for Silencing Opposing Viewpoints?





There’s been some push back recently on Twitter against the whole idea of positive attitude as a good thing. It gave me some things to think about, because in general, I’ve found a positive mindset to be a source of strength in my life. I’ve even written several posts about positive thinking, including this one:

10 Thoughts On Positive Attitude to Share With Your Team

A positive school is built on positive moments. It doesn’t just happen by accident. Every interaction counts. It takes a concerted effort on the part of everyone to create an environment that is awesome. So what are some things everyone should know to be more positive in their own mindset and help contribute to that positive environment we all want?

How could someone not be in favor of having a positive outlook? I was curious and a little puzzled by some of the responses I’ve seen to the idea of having a positive attitude. I wanted to know more.



So here are some of the arguments I’ve seen. Keep in mind I’m doing my best to synthesize, so if you’re in the anti-positive thinking camp, let me know if I’m missing the point.



1. Calls for a positive attitude are one way the dominant culture silences critics and those with opposing viewpoints. By asking me to have a positive attitude, you are refusing to acknowledge my experience and my suffering. I’m not allowed to speak my mind or share my experience without being labeled a negative person.



2. Positive thinking is not the solution to mental health issues. To the contrary, it’s part of the mental health crisis. It’s no longer okay to feel negative emotions like sadness, fear, isolation, hopelessness, or anger. If you feel those emotions, you’re not being positive, and that’s not okay.  The pressure to feel positive all the time is too much, and so when I don’t, I feel further devalued and unable to measure up.



3. Sharing positive thoughts is empty of meaning. It’s not doing the real work of challenging injustice or working to understand those who are oppressed or those who are suffering. Instead of sharing something “positive,” share something that demands justice or calls out oppressive forces. In other words, raise some hell to demand change. That’s doing something positive.



I think those are some really good reasons to push back against positive thinking, if you define and understand being positive in a certain way. I think there are some nuances to the idea of being positive that are important for the idea to work, otherwise it’s just a thought that we should all be happy all the time, and that’s just not helpful.



Here’s how I would respond to the three concerns about positive thinking.



1. Being positive doesn’t mean everyone has to be agreeable and have the same opinions. But it does mean we express our opinions in ways that are productive and helpful. In a school, leaders need to encourage productive conflict and invite critical dialogue. I want people around me to push my thinking and challenge my ideas. That’s how we get better. 



But I’m guessing…in some cases, leaders are silencing voices who are simply expressing a different viewpoint and using positive attitude as the reason. Either you agree with me or you obviously don’t have a positive attitude? It’s one or the other. That type of thinking is not effective.



2. Being positive doesn’t mean you’re happy all the time. I think believing you should be happy all the time does result in complications to mental health. We need to feel all our feelings, the positive and negative ones. The truth is none of our feeling are truly negative. They’re not bad. They’re just feelings. They come and go. And as humans, all of them are legitimate. Being positive is the ability to experience the array of human emotions and respond to them in ways that are helpful. 



In response to every emotion, we have the choice in what we do with it. How do we hold that emotion in our mind and how do we think about it? Do we listen to what our emotions tell us and let them take us down whatever path they choose? Or, do we choose the path for our emotions? Do we point them in a direction we want them to go? We’re not repressing them or denying them. It’s important to fully acknowledge how we feel, but then choose to use that emotion as fuel to go in some positive direction in life. I’m going to use this pain or sorrow for good in this certain way.



Of course, this is always a process. There are times I do not handle my emotions in productive ways. And that results in strain on my relationships or sticky situations as a leader. I’ve often had to apologize for times I allowed my emotions to choose the path.



3. Sharing positive thoughts are empty of meaning if they are empty of meaning. But they don’t have to be. In fact, the person who can communicate difficult, hard truths in a positive way is a wise person. There is wisdom and strength in communicating a difficult message in a way that doesn’t offend or alienate. That’s making an effort to have dialogue and not a shouting match. I see no benefit to a shouting match. Neither side is really listening. Nothing productive is resulting from this exchange.



And yet, that is how most people seem to be handling conversations these days in regard to our most pressing issues. It’s evident all over social media. There is no dialogue. There is no civility. Each side hurls insults, snide remarks, insulting labels, and believes they have the moral high ground. Our way is the right way!!!



It makes me sad when I see educators fall into this same type of behavior. Unfortunately, I’ve noticed more destructive posts like this recently from educators. We have an obligation to set a good example for our students every day in our classrooms, and also on social media. We have an obligation to do our very best, all the time, to be respectful and positive with our words and actions.



At the same time, it’s never okay to silence an opposing viewpoint on the grounds that the person needs to be positive. It’s okay to ask someone to communicate respectfully. But it’s not okay to silence someone who disagrees.



Let me know your thoughts on all of this. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. I always enjoy hearing from you.

      

Read More Is Positivity an Excuse for Silencing Opposing Viewpoints?





There’s been some push back recently on Twitter against the whole idea of positive attitude as a good thing. It gave me some things to think about, because in general, I’ve found a positive mindset to be a source of strength in my life. I’ve even written several posts about positive thinking, including this one:

10 Thoughts On Positive Attitude to Share With Your Team

A positive school is built on positive moments. It doesn’t just happen by accident. Every interaction counts. It takes a concerted effort on the part of everyone to create an environment that is awesome. So what are some things everyone should know to be more positive in their own mindset and help contribute to that positive environment we all want?

How could someone not be in favor of having a positive outlook? I was curious and a little puzzled by some of the responses I’ve seen to the idea of having a positive attitude. I wanted to know more.



So here are some of the arguments I’ve seen. Keep in mind I’m doing my best to synthesize, so if you’re in the anti-positive thinking camp, let me know if I’m missing the point.



1. Calls for a positive attitude are one way the dominant culture silences critics and those with opposing viewpoints. By asking me to have a positive attitude, you are refusing to acknowledge my experience and my suffering. I’m not allowed to speak my mind or share my experience without being labeled a negative person.



2. Positive thinking is not the solution to mental health issues. To the contrary, it’s part of the mental health crisis. It’s no longer okay to feel negative emotions like sadness, fear, isolation, hopelessness, or anger. If you feel those emotions, you’re not being positive, and that’s not okay.  The pressure to feel positive all the time is too much, and so when I don’t, I feel further devalued and unable to measure up.



3. Sharing positive thoughts is empty of meaning. It’s not doing the real work of challenging injustice or working to understand those who are oppressed or those who are suffering. Instead of sharing something “positive,” share something that demands justice or calls out oppressive forces. In other words, raise some hell to demand change. That’s doing something positive.



I think those are some really good reasons to push back against positive thinking, if you define and understand being positive in a certain way. I think there are some nuances to the idea of being positive that are important for the idea to work, otherwise it’s just a thought that we should all be happy all the time, and that’s just not helpful.



Here’s how I would respond to the three concerns about positive thinking.



1. Being positive doesn’t mean everyone has to be agreeable and have the same opinions. But it does mean we express our opinions in ways that are productive and helpful. In a school, leaders need to encourage productive conflict and invite critical dialogue. I want people around me to push my thinking and challenge my ideas. That’s how we get better. 



But I’m guessing…in some cases, leaders are silencing voices who are simply expressing a different viewpoint and using positive attitude as the reason. Either you agree with me or you obviously don’t have a positive attitude? It’s one or the other. That type of thinking is not effective.



2. Being positive doesn’t mean you’re happy all the time. I think believing you should be happy all the time does result in complications to mental health. We need to feel all our feelings, the positive and negative ones. The truth is none of our feeling are truly negative. They’re not bad. They’re just feelings. They come and go. And as humans, all of them are legitimate. Being positive is the ability to experience the array of human emotions and respond to them in ways that are helpful. 



In response to every emotion, we have the choice in what we do with it. How do we hold that emotion in our mind and how do we think about it? Do we listen to what our emotions tell us and let them take us down whatever path they choose? Or, do we choose the path for our emotions? Do we point them in a direction we want them to go? We’re not repressing them or denying them. It’s important to fully acknowledge how we feel, but then choose to use that emotion as fuel to go in some positive direction in life. I’m going to use this pain or sorrow for good in this certain way.



Of course, this is always a process. There are times I do not handle my emotions in productive ways. And that results in strain on my relationships or sticky situations as a leader. I’ve often had to apologize for times I allowed my emotions to choose the path.



3. Sharing positive thoughts are empty of meaning if they are empty of meaning. But they don’t have to be. In fact, the person who can communicate difficult, hard truths in a positive way is a wise person. There is wisdom and strength in communicating a difficult message in a way that doesn’t offend or alienate. That’s making an effort to have dialogue and not a shouting match. I see no benefit to a shouting match. Neither side is really listening. Nothing productive is resulting from this exchange.



And yet, that is how most people seem to be handling conversations these days in regard to our most pressing issues. It’s evident all over social media. There is no dialogue. There is no civility. Each side hurls insults, snide remarks, insulting labels, and believes they have the moral high ground. Our way is the right way!!!



It makes me sad when I see educators fall into this same type of behavior. Unfortunately, I’ve noticed more destructive posts like this recently from educators. We have an obligation to set a good example for our students every day in our classrooms, and also on social media. We have an obligation to do our very best, all the time, to be respectful and positive with our words and actions.



At the same time, it’s never okay to silence an opposing viewpoint on the grounds that the person needs to be positive. It’s okay to ask someone to communicate respectfully. But it’s not okay to silence someone who disagrees.



Let me know your thoughts on all of this. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. I always enjoy hearing from you.

      

Read More Is Positivity an Excuse for Silencing Opposing Viewpoints?



A few months ago, I took a group of teachers to visit the Ron Clark Academy (RCA) in Atlanta. It was an amazing experience to see the school up close and learn along with educators from all across the country.



During the opening, Ron Clark shared that visiting the school is kind of like going to the grocery store. When you go, you don’t take home everything that is on the shelves. You pick out the things you need, the things you like, or the things you want. But you have lots of options.



Everyone is not going to fill their shopping cart with the same items at the grocery store. Likewise, not everything that happens at RCA will work for every teacher, every classroom, or every school.



However, there are some amazing selections for you to consider. And if you are passionate, creative, and inspired, you will see all sorts of ways you can bring pieces of RCA to your work. 



And if you’ve lost a little of your passion, creativity, or inspiration, you might just rekindle that too!



I think the same can be said for building a Personal Learning Network (PLN) and connecting on Twitter. Not every idea you encounter on Twitter will go in your shopping cart. 



Some things might not work for you right now. You’ll pass over those. 



Some things might seem too big to fit in your cart right now. You can consider those again in the future.



You might only go shopping once a week at first. Later, you may want to stop in daily to see what’s new.



That’s what’s great about it. It’s completely up to you. And customized for you. With a little skill, you can get out of it what you need, whenever you need it.

Twitter is actually more like Amazon than your neighborhood grocery. Part of Amazon’s mission is to be a place where “people can find and discover anything they might want to buy online.” 



Twitter is like that for educators. You can connect with people who are like-minded and get ideas and support for just about anything you want to accomplish as an educator.



And you can do it just about any time and any place that works for you.



It’s a total game-changer. 



Jeff Nelson adapted the following list from my satirical post about Twitter PD. I admit I had fun with the satire, but he put a positive spin on it. There are just so many reasons for educators to use this tool. It’s such a great way to grow and learn.






Who else thinks Twitter is a game-changer? How has it impacted your work as an educator? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Twitter Is Like Going to the Grocery Store



A few months ago, I took a group of teachers to visit the Ron Clark Academy (RCA) in Atlanta. It was an amazing experience to see the school up close and learn along with educators from all across the country.



During the opening, Ron Clark shared that visiting the school is kind of like going to the grocery store. When you go, you don’t take home everything that is on the shelves. You pick out the things you need, the things you like, or the things you want. But you have lots of options.



Everyone is not going to fill their shopping cart with the same items at the grocery store. Likewise, not everything that happens at RCA will work for every teacher, every classroom, or every school.



However, there are some amazing selections for you to consider. And if you are passionate, creative, and inspired, you will see all sorts of ways you can bring pieces of RCA to your work. 



And if you’ve lost a little of your passion, creativity, or inspiration, you might just rekindle that too!



I think the same can be said for building a Personal Learning Network (PLN) and connecting on Twitter. Not every idea you encounter on Twitter will go in your shopping cart. 



Some things might not work for you right now. You’ll pass over those. 



Some things might seem too big to fit in your cart right now. You can consider those again in the future.



You might only go shopping once a week at first. Later, you may want to stop in daily to see what’s new.



That’s what’s great about it. It’s completely up to you. And customized for you. With a little skill, you can get out of it what you need, whenever you need it.

Twitter is actually more like Amazon than your neighborhood grocery. Part of Amazon’s mission is to be a place where “people can find and discover anything they might want to buy online.” 



Twitter is like that for educators. You can connect with people who are like-minded and get ideas and support for just about anything you want to accomplish as an educator.



And you can do it just about any time and any place that works for you.



It’s a total game-changer. 



Jeff Nelson adapted the following list from my satirical post about Twitter PD. I admit I had fun with the satire, but he put a positive spin on it. There are just so many reasons for educators to use this tool. It’s such a great way to grow and learn.






Who else thinks Twitter is a game-changer? How has it impacted your work as an educator? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Twitter Is Like Going to the Grocery Store



A few months ago, I took a group of teachers to visit the Ron Clark Academy (RCA) in Atlanta. It was an amazing experience to see the school up close and learn along with educators from all across the country.



During the opening, Ron Clark shared that visiting the school is kind of like going to the grocery store. When you go, you don’t take home everything that is on the shelves. You pick out the things you need, the things you like, or the things you want. But you have lots of options.



Everyone is not going to fill their shopping cart with the same items at the grocery store. Likewise, not everything that happens at RCA will work for every teacher, every classroom, or every school.



However, there are some amazing selections for you to consider. And if you are passionate, creative, and inspired, you will see all sorts of ways you can bring pieces of RCA to your work. 



And if you’ve lost a little of your passion, creativity, or inspiration, you might just rekindle that too!



I think the same can be said for building a Personal Learning Network (PLN) and connecting on Twitter. Not every idea you encounter on Twitter will go in your shopping cart. 



Some things might not work for you right now. You’ll pass over those. 



Some things might seem too big to fit in your cart right now. You can consider those again in the future.



You might only go shopping once a week at first. Later, you may want to stop in daily to see what’s new.



That’s what’s great about it. It’s completely up to you. And customized for you. With a little skill, you can get out of it what you need, whenever you need it.

Twitter is actually more like Amazon than your neighborhood grocery. Part of Amazon’s mission is to be a place where “people can find and discover anything they might want to buy online.” 



Twitter is like that for educators. You can connect with people who are like-minded and get ideas and support for just about anything you want to accomplish as an educator.



And you can do it just about any time and any place that works for you.



It’s a total game-changer. 



Jeff Nelson adapted the following list from my satirical post about Twitter PD. I admit I had fun with the satire, but he put a positive spin on it. There are just so many reasons for educators to use this tool. It’s such a great way to grow and learn.






Who else thinks Twitter is a game-changer? How has it impacted your work as an educator? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Twitter Is Like Going to the Grocery Store

Twitter EDU :: Your (FREE) One-Stop-All-You-Need-To-Know-Guide to Twitter I have been working on this book for over a year and a half, and it’s finally done! Get your free copy here. Here is a brief description of the book: Your One-Stop-All-You-Need-To-Know-Guide to Twitter. “The hardest part of Twitter is that it does not have a friendly […]

Read More Twitter EDU – The Twitter Guide





I’ve been planning to write this post for the past two years. That’s right. It’s been that long. I’m not sure why I didn’t write it sooner. But the events of this weekend swiftly and certainly moved these ideas off the sidelines.



Friday night we had home football. There is always some stress associated with each home game. Our admin team often jokes about how much easier the road games are. There are just so many things that can go wrong with large crowds. On top of that, I was at the end of a long week and physically tired. That’s typical for Friday night, right?



So I noticed a Twitter post after halftime that tagged our school. I knew the individual who posted it and have a very good relationship with him, although we haven’t interacted that often. 



But I quickly became offended by the post. How could this person publicly criticize the school? He should know better than that. He manages people and events and must understand the challenges that come with that. Social media is not the place to air your concerns, at least not initially. Come talk to me. Give me a chance to solve the problem.



So…



I quickly fired off a text message to the individual expressing my frustration and disappointment.



Then came the reply, “Should I delete it?”



“Well, of course you should,” I thought.



I responded in another message ramping up my indignation.



And then when his next reply came, I got it. He clarified and all of the sudden, it was clear. It hit me all at once. It almost took the air out of me. He didn’t mean it that way! I took it wrong!



In my haste, I completely misunderstood the comment. I missed it completely.



I went back and read it again. Any other person reading the Tweet would NOT have taken it the way I did. I had started climbing the assumption ladder and had gone straight to the top rung.



Time to own my mistake. My very embarrassing mistake.



I sent my apologies. I tried to explain. I told him he did nothing wrong. I should know better. It’s totally on me. I’m sorry. I felt terrible.



Fortunately, the person on the other end was gracious in accepting my apology. Looking back, I can’t even believe I made this mistake. I practice these skills every day. Not assuming. Trying to understand the other person’s perspective. Not jumping to conclusions.




Retrieved: http://metothepowerofwe.com/me-to-the-power-of-we/assume-dangerous-act/





So how does this happen?



A couple of years ago I read the book Crucial Conversations. It is the best thing I’ve ever read about effective communication when the stakes are high, when there might be strong opposing thoughts or opinions.



One part in particular is so important for us in keeping conversations safe. We have to be careful about the stories we tell ourselves. Here are a few of the big ideas I took from the book.



Stories Cause Feelings



Someone else doesn’t make you mad. You get angry because of the story you tell yourself. “I feel bad because of my story, not your actions.” Emotions don’t settle in like fog. Others don’t make you mad. You make you mad. You tell yourself a story, and the story leads to the emotional response. Once these stories take hold, they have a life of their own.



Avoid Silence or Violence



To keep good dialogue, we have to keep safety in the conversation. If we lose safety, the conversation will turn to one or the other or both parties holding back and not being honest or lashing out and taking cheap shots. Neither silence nor violence is a healthy response. We want to develop shared meaning and be totally honest. We want to learn from the conversation, not be right or wrong.



Stories Are How We Explain Why, How, and What Is Happening To Us



So even when presented with exactly the same set of circumstances, we will determine if it is positive or negative based on the story we tell ourselves. Our story is how we attach significance to these events. We decide the level of significance based on the story we tell.



Many Possible Responses



For every set of circumstances, there is not just one way to respond. My emotions are NOT the only valid response. So just because such and such happens to me doesn’t mean I have to respond in a certain way. There are many possible responses.



Slow Down



The thing that got me in trouble was how quickly I settled on the story in my mind based on the Tweet I was reading. I attached a certain meaning almost immediately. I didn’t consider any other possibilities. Several things had happened earlier that primed me for this response, but no matter, I still wouldn’t have failed in communicating if I would’ve slowed down or even consulted with someone else before drawing conclusions.



Three Stories



We tend to tell ourselves three types of stories to explain things we don’t like. We also use these stories to justify our own bad behavior.



Victim Stories – “It’s not my fault.”

Villain Stories – “It’s all your fault.”

Helpless Stories – “There’s nothing else I can do.”



Stories Result in a Path to Action



1. See/hear (facts)

2. Tell a story (interpretation of facts)

3. Feel (emotions)

4. Act (choose a response)



Our path to action may seem reasonable and certain, but if it is based on a story and a feeling, we may act in ways that are not helpful. I saw the Tweet on Friday night and immediately told myself a story. Then I felt upset and even angry. And that led to the awkward text message conversation that ensued. Oh my…



So this is really practical stuff that we can apply daily. In fact, the entire book has great wisdom for educators. We deal with so many crucial conversations. It happens all day, every day. It’s important to develop these skills.



It’s so important to remember there are the facts and then there are the stories we tell ourselves based on the facts. To close, here are four questions to ask that can help to avoid the crazy dance of some of our stories.



1. Am I pretending not to notice my role in the problem?

2. Why would a reasonable, rational, and decent person do this? This one would have stopped me cold on Friday night.

3. What do I really want?

4. What would I do right now if I really wanted these results?



I encourage you to read Crucial Conversations. I still mess it up sometimes (obviously), but the book was really helpful for me in dealing with difficult situations. Have you noticed yourself telling stories and jumping to conclusions? Maybe with student behaviors? Or colleagues? Are you retreating to silence or resorting to violence in your conversations? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Facts and the Stories We Tell Ourselves Based on the Facts





I’ve been planning to write this post for the past two years. That’s right. It’s been that long. I’m not sure why I didn’t write it sooner. But the events of this weekend swiftly and certainly moved these ideas off the sidelines.



Friday night we had home football. There is always some stress associated with each home game. Our admin team often jokes about how much easier the road games are. There are just so many things that can go wrong with large crowds. On top of that, I was at the end of a long week and physically tired. That’s typical for Friday night, right?



So I noticed a Twitter post after halftime that tagged our school. I knew the individual who posted it and have a very good relationship with him, although we haven’t interacted that often. 



But I quickly became offended by the post. How could this person publicly criticize the school? He should know better than that. He manages people and events and must understand the challenges that come with that. Social media is not the place to air your concerns, at least not initially. Come talk to me. Give me a chance to solve the problem.



So…



I quickly fired off a text message to the individual expressing my frustration and disappointment.



Then came the reply, “Should I delete it?”



“Well, of course you should,” I thought.



I responded in another message ramping up my indignation.



And then when his next reply came, I got it. He clarified and all of the sudden, it was clear. It hit me all at once. It almost took the air out of me. He didn’t mean it that way! I took it wrong!



In my haste, I completely misunderstood the comment. I missed it completely.



I went back and read it again. Any other person reading the Tweet would NOT have taken it the way I did. I had started climbing the assumption ladder and had gone straight to the top rung.



Time to own my mistake. My very embarrassing mistake.



I sent my apologies. I tried to explain. I told him he did nothing wrong. I should know better. It’s totally on me. I’m sorry. I felt terrible.



Fortunately, the person on the other end was gracious in accepting my apology. Looking back, I can’t even believe I made this mistake. I practice these skills every day. Not assuming. Trying to understand the other person’s perspective. Not jumping to conclusions.




Retrieved: http://metothepowerofwe.com/me-to-the-power-of-we/assume-dangerous-act/





So how does this happen?



A couple of years ago I read the book Crucial Conversations. It is the best thing I’ve ever read about effective communication when the stakes are high, when there might be strong opposing thoughts or opinions.



One part in particular is so important for us in keeping conversations safe. We have to be careful about the stories we tell ourselves. Here are a few of the big ideas I took from the book.



Stories Cause Feelings



Someone else doesn’t make you mad. You get angry because of the story you tell yourself. “I feel bad because of my story, not your actions.” Emotions don’t settle in like fog. Others don’t make you mad. You make you mad. You tell yourself a story, and the story leads to the emotional response. Once these stories take hold, they have a life of their own.



Avoid Silence or Violence



To keep good dialogue, we have to keep safety in the conversation. If we lose safety, the conversation will turn to one or the other or both parties holding back and not being honest or lashing out and taking cheap shots. Neither silence nor violence is a healthy response. We want to develop shared meaning and be totally honest. We want to learn from the conversation, not be right or wrong.



Stories Are How We Explain Why, How, and What Is Happening To Us



So even when presented with exactly the same set of circumstances, we will determine if it is positive or negative based on the story we tell ourselves. Our story is how we attach significance to these events. We decide the level of significance based on the story we tell.



Many Possible Responses



For every set of circumstances, there is not just one way to respond. My emotions are NOT the only valid response. So just because such and such happens to me doesn’t mean I have to respond in a certain way. There are many possible responses.



Slow Down



The thing that got me in trouble was how quickly I settled on the story in my mind based on the Tweet I was reading. I attached a certain meaning almost immediately. I didn’t consider any other possibilities. Several things had happened earlier that primed me for this response, but no matter, I still wouldn’t have failed in communicating if I would’ve slowed down or even consulted with someone else before drawing conclusions.



Three Stories



We tend to tell ourselves three types of stories to explain things we don’t like. We also use these stories to justify our own bad behavior.



Victim Stories – “It’s not my fault.”

Villain Stories – “It’s all your fault.”

Helpless Stories – “There’s nothing else I can do.”



Stories Result in a Path to Action



1. See/hear (facts)

2. Tell a story (interpretation of facts)

3. Feel (emotions)

4. Act (choose a response)



Our path to action may seem reasonable and certain, but if it is based on a story and a feeling, we may act in ways that are not helpful. I saw the Tweet on Friday night and immediately told myself a story. Then I felt upset and even angry. And that led to the awkward text message conversation that ensued. Oh my…



So this is really practical stuff that we can apply daily. In fact, the entire book has great wisdom for educators. We deal with so many crucial conversations. It happens all day, every day. It’s important to develop these skills.



It’s so important to remember there are the facts and then there are the stories we tell ourselves based on the facts. To close, here are four questions to ask that can help to avoid the crazy dance of some of our stories.



1. Am I pretending not to notice my role in the problem?

2. Why would a reasonable, rational, and decent person do this? This one would have stopped me cold on Friday night.

3. What do I really want?

4. What would I do right now if I really wanted these results?



I encourage you to read Crucial Conversations. I still mess it up sometimes (obviously), but the book was really helpful for me in dealing with difficult situations. Have you noticed yourself telling stories and jumping to conclusions? Maybe with student behaviors? Or colleagues? Are you retreating to silence or resorting to violence in your conversations? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Facts and the Stories We Tell Ourselves Based on the Facts

“Educators who work in isolation improve incrementally, while educators who collaborate transform exponentially!” I said this in a Twitter Chat a few days ago in response to the question: “Why…

Read More Isolation vs Collaboration



The use of technology in schools continues to rise each year. By 2019, spending for education technology is expected to be more than $55 billion. More and more schools are utilizing devices as part of routine, daily learning. 



And this shift is happening for good reason. The world is becoming increasingly digital, and students will need skills that involve using technology to create, connect, and learn. A recent article claimed that just having the word ‘digital’ listed on your resume improved your chances of landing the job.



As technology becomes even more pervasive in schools, the need for effective digital leadership will increase as well. Even now, I believe it’s impossible to be an effective leader unless you are also an effective digital leader. All educators need skills for using digital tools to support and transform learning.



But there are also a number of myths about digital leadership I want to dispel. There are often misunderstandings about what it means to be a digital leader.

1. Digital leaders are tech geeks.



You don’t have to be a technology geek to be an effective digital leader. It’s great if you have strong digital skills or love technology, but it’s more important to be an expert about learning. The most important thing is the willingness to learn more about technology. It’s great if you’re a tech geek, but it’s essential to be a learning geek. And, it’s critical to recognize the importance of technology to help you and your students leverage skills. 



Every digital leader should strive to learn more about using tech and strive to make that learning visible. I’m often considered a tech-forward principal, but I learn something new every day. It’s not as important to have all the technical knowledge as it is to model the mindset of a constant learner.



2. Digital leaders are always administrators.



It’s very important for administrators to be digital leaders, but they aren’t the only ones in the school who can do the job. We need leadership from every corner of the school. It takes collective leadership to really support the culture of digital learning that is needed in schools. Change is hard, and there are often leaders in the school besides the administrator who can help champion the cause of using technology for learning.



3. Digital leaders force everyone in their schools to use technology.



Effective digital leaders don’t look for technology to be used at every turn. They don’t force technology on people. Instead, they constantly model, teach, and inspire. They start with why it’s important to for students to use technology, and then they challenge people to grow. They don’t want technology being used just for the sake of technology. They want to see digital tools being used when it makes sense to use them and when it supports learning. They encourage teachers to use digital tools in ways that transform learning.



Every educator is at a different place with their skills and their mindset about technology. Digital leaders honor teachers as learners and support them wherever they are in their learning journey. Even when growth is slow, if the educator is growing, that is success.



4. Digital leaders love everything about technology.



Not true. Digital leaders can fully see the importance and relevance of technology and still not love everything about technology. Sometimes technology is a pain. It hovers somewhere between being a blessing and a burden. And there are some parts of technology we don’t have to embrace. No one likes it when technology doesn’t work. Devices can be a huge distraction. There are all sorts of dangers online. People get addicted to the internet. And the list goes on. Some of these challenges work directly against learning.



But clearly there are incredible benefits to technology too. Digital leaders work tirelessly to overcome the pitfalls of technology use to help make sure teachers and students have what they need to leverage these tools for productive use. There isn’t a single challenge I’ve seen that can’t be overcome with inspired leadership and careful planning.



5. Digital leaders spend the whole day tweeting.



Completely false. There’s no question that digital leaders tend to be connected leaders and one of the best ways to connect is through Twitter. In fact, Twitter has been one of the best tools for professional learning I’ve ever encountered, and it has been an invaluable resource in my own digital leadership, and in my leadership overall.



But effective digital leaders are busy each day supporting learning in their schools in hundreds of face to face interactions. Not everything that happens in a school is digital, nor should it be. Our goal in our school as we transitioned to a device for every learner was to improve the quality of our conversations at the same time. We want better learning with digital tools, while at the same time increasing the quantity and quality of discussions happening in classrooms.



Question: What other myths or misunderstandings do you see about digital leadership? What are the biggest challenges digital leaders face? I want to hear your feedback. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 5 Myths of Digital Leadership



The use of technology in schools continues to rise each year. By 2019, spending for education technology is expected to be more than $55 billion. More and more schools are utilizing devices as part of routine, daily learning. 



And this shift is happening for good reason. The world is becoming increasingly digital, and students will need skills that involve using technology to create, connect, and learn. A recent article claimed that just having the word ‘digital’ listed on your resume improved your chances of landing the job.



As technology becomes even more pervasive in schools, the need for effective digital leadership will increase as well. Even now, I believe it’s impossible to be an effective leader unless you are also an effective digital leader. All educators need skills for using digital tools to support and transform learning.



But there are also a number of myths about digital leadership I want to dispel. There are often misunderstandings about what it means to be a digital leader.

1. Digital leaders are tech geeks.



You don’t have to be a technology geek to be an effective digital leader. It’s great if you have strong digital skills or love technology, but it’s more important to be an expert about learning. The most important thing is the willingness to learn more about technology. It’s great if you’re a tech geek, but it’s essential to be a learning geek. And, it’s critical to recognize the importance of technology to help you and your students leverage skills. 



Every digital leader should strive to learn more about using tech and strive to make that learning visible. I’m often considered a tech-forward principal, but I learn something new every day. It’s not as important to have all the technical knowledge as it is to model the mindset of a constant learner.



2. Digital leaders are always administrators.



It’s very important for administrators to be digital leaders, but they aren’t the only ones in the school who can do the job. We need leadership from every corner of the school. It takes collective leadership to really support the culture of digital learning that is needed in schools. Change is hard, and there are often leaders in the school besides the administrator who can help champion the cause of using technology for learning.



3. Digital leaders force everyone in their schools to use technology.



Effective digital leaders don’t look for technology to be used at every turn. They don’t force technology on people. Instead, they constantly model, teach, and inspire. They start with why it’s important to for students to use technology, and then they challenge people to grow. They don’t want technology being used just for the sake of technology. They want to see digital tools being used when it makes sense to use them and when it supports learning. They encourage teachers to use digital tools in ways that transform learning.



Every educator is at a different place with their skills and their mindset about technology. Digital leaders honor teachers as learners and support them wherever they are in their learning journey. Even when growth is slow, if the educator is growing, that is success.



4. Digital leaders love everything about technology.



Not true. Digital leaders can fully see the importance and relevance of technology and still not love everything about technology. Sometimes technology is a pain. It hovers somewhere between being a blessing and a burden. And there are some parts of technology we don’t have to embrace. No one likes it when technology doesn’t work. Devices can be a huge distraction. There are all sorts of dangers online. People get addicted to the internet. And the list goes on. Some of these challenges work directly against learning.



But clearly there are incredible benefits to technology too. Digital leaders work tirelessly to overcome the pitfalls of technology use to help make sure teachers and students have what they need to leverage these tools for productive use. There isn’t a single challenge I’ve seen that can’t be overcome with inspired leadership and careful planning.



5. Digital leaders spend the whole day tweeting.



Completely false. There’s no question that digital leaders tend to be connected leaders and one of the best ways to connect is through Twitter. In fact, Twitter has been one of the best tools for professional learning I’ve ever encountered, and it has been an invaluable resource in my own digital leadership, and in my leadership overall.



But effective digital leaders are busy each day supporting learning in their schools in hundreds of face to face interactions. Not everything that happens in a school is digital, nor should it be. Our goal in our school as we transitioned to a device for every learner was to improve the quality of our conversations at the same time. We want better learning with digital tools, while at the same time increasing the quantity and quality of discussions happening in classrooms.



Question: What other myths or misunderstandings do you see about digital leadership? What are the biggest challenges digital leaders face? I want to hear your feedback. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 5 Myths of Digital Leadership



I just finished reading the latest book from Todd Whitaker, Jeff Zoul, and Jimmy Casas—Start. Right. Now.: Teach and Lead for Excellence. The authors have packed the book with wisdom and insight from their collective experiences. The end result is a book for educators that is an excellent guide for becoming a stronger leader.



Something that caught my attention right away is the idea that every educator who is effective is also an effective leader. Leadership is not just for those in formal positions. Every teacher must grow as a leader, too. And conversely, every leader should aim to be an effective teacher as well. These roles are very complimentary and are both essential to creating outstanding schools. This idea reminded me of a recent post from this blog, 7 Reasons ‘Classroom Leadership’ Is Better Than ‘Classroom Management.’



So while Start. Right. Now. is definitely a leadership book, it is equally relevant to teachers or formal leaders like principals or directors. The authors share a framework of four qualities important to all educators who strive for excellence. These qualities are adapted from leadership guru John Maxwell.



1. Know the Way



Excellent leaders must pursue and possess knowledge of their chosen field. For educators, that means knowing content, best practices, strategies, and how to influence people. Knowing the way means knowing what works based on experience and based on knowledge passed along from others. 






2. Show the Way



Showing the way involves coming together to develop a vision for learning and then building capacity in others to reach for and achieve that vision. To show the way, leaders must be future-focused, always preparing for what is to come, while simultaneously doing the work today that will lead to a brighter future tomorrow. Always be present in the moment to create brighter moments ahead. Where some people may see only problems, great leaders see possibilities and they focus their energy accordingly.






3. Go the Way



Your example is your most powerful influence as an educator. Students and peers are always watching to see if what we say corresponds with what we do. It matters how we live out our values, and it matters how we treat everyone we meet. Every interaction counts. The following list exemplifies educators who go the way. These staff members:

  • Believe in giving back
  • Invest in others every day
  • Find time to greet children every day
  • Possess a “whatever it takes” mindset
  • Want to be pushed by others
  • Find a connection with kids each day
  • Go out of their way to share a bit of kindness with others
  • Accept that teaching is calling, not a job
  • Take time to show gratitude to others
  • Make time for others, but also make time for themselves

4. Grow Each Day



Great educators make their own personal and professional growth a top priority. The recognize that change is inevitable but growth is optional. However, failing to make efforts to grow results in certain failure. Surround yourself with excellence, invite feedback, and be open to reflecting on areas you can improve. Connect with other committed educators who can support you in your efforts to grow. The only way to reach your potential is to start right where you are and focus on getting better every day.






The book is filled with many stories, examples, and resources to support these essential leadership principles. At the end of each chapter, ideas from other outstanding educators are featured. You might recognize a number of the ones included. They might even be part of your PLN. Some of my favorites include Pernille Ripp, Neil Gupta, Glenn Robbins, Bill Ferriter, Jon Harper, Jennifer Hogan, and Heidi Veal. These short contributions add another dimension to the book.



You’ll also find specific actionable strategies at the end of each chapter with links to resources to help you get started. For instance, there are suggestions to write a personal mission statement, create a vision statement, attend an EdCamp, and participate in a Twitter chat. It’s packed with great ideas every educator is sure to find helpful.



Question: How are you growing in your leadership as an educator? Are you getting better every day? If you want to do something to level up your leadership, consider reading Start. Right. Now. 



I want hear from you. Be sure to leave a comment on the blog or share on Facebook or Twitter. Your thoughts and ideas take the discussion deeper.



You can snag a copy of the book at the link below. 



This post contains Amazon Affiliate links. If you visit Amazon via the links and purchase items, I receive a small commission at no additional cost to you.

Read More Don’t Wait To Be Excellent…Start. Right. Now.



I just finished reading the latest book from Todd Whitaker, Jeff Zoul, and Jimmy Casas—Start. Right. Now.: Teach and Lead for Excellence. The authors have packed the book with wisdom and insight from their collective experiences. The end result is a book for educators that is an excellent guide for becoming a stronger leader.



Something that caught my attention right away is the idea that every educator who is effective is also an effective leader. Leadership is not just for those in formal positions. Every teacher must grow as a leader, too. And conversely, every leader should aim to be an effective teacher as well. These roles are very complimentary and are both essential to creating outstanding schools. This idea reminded me of a recent post from this blog, 7 Reasons ‘Classroom Leadership’ Is Better Than ‘Classroom Management.’



So while Start. Right. Now. is definitely a leadership book, it is equally relevant to teachers or formal leaders like principals or directors. The authors share a framework of four qualities important to all educators who strive for excellence. These qualities are adapted from leadership guru John Maxwell.



1. Know the Way



Excellent leaders must pursue and possess knowledge of their chosen field. For educators, that means knowing content, best practices, strategies, and how to influence people. Knowing the way means knowing what works based on experience and based on knowledge passed along from others. 






2. Show the Way



Showing the way involves coming together to develop a vision for learning and then building capacity in others to reach for and achieve that vision. To show the way, leaders must be future-focused, always preparing for what is to come, while simultaneously doing the work today that will lead to a brighter future tomorrow. Always be present in the moment to create brighter moments ahead. Where some people may see only problems, great leaders see possibilities and they focus their energy accordingly.






3. Go the Way



Your example is your most powerful influence as an educator. Students and peers are always watching to see if what we say corresponds with what we do. It matters how we live out our values, and it matters how we treat everyone we meet. Every interaction counts. The following list exemplifies educators who go the way. These staff members:

  • Believe in giving back
  • Invest in others every day
  • Find time to greet children every day
  • Possess a “whatever it takes” mindset
  • Want to be pushed by others
  • Find a connection with kids each day
  • Go out of their way to share a bit of kindness with others
  • Accept that teaching is calling, not a job
  • Take time to show gratitude to others
  • Make time for others, but also make time for themselves

4. Grow Each Day



Great educators make their own personal and professional growth a top priority. The recognize that change is inevitable but growth is optional. However, failing to make efforts to grow results in certain failure. Surround yourself with excellence, invite feedback, and be open to reflecting on areas you can improve. Connect with other committed educators who can support you in your efforts to grow. The only way to reach your potential is to start right where you are and focus on getting better every day.






The book is filled with many stories, examples, and resources to support these essential leadership principles. At the end of each chapter, ideas from other outstanding educators are featured. You might recognize a number of the ones included. They might even be part of your PLN. Some of my favorites include Pernille Ripp, Neil Gupta, Glenn Robbins, Bill Ferriter, Jon Harper, Jennifer Hogan, and Heidi Veal. These short contributions add another dimension to the book.



You’ll also find specific actionable strategies at the end of each chapter with links to resources to help you get started. For instance, there are suggestions to write a personal mission statement, create a vision statement, attend an EdCamp, and participate in a Twitter chat. It’s packed with great ideas every educator is sure to find helpful.



Question: How are you growing in your leadership as an educator? Are you getting better every day? If you want to do something to level up your leadership, consider reading Start. Right. Now. 



I want hear from you. Be sure to leave a comment on the blog or share on Facebook or Twitter. Your thoughts and ideas take the discussion deeper.



You can snag a copy of the book at the link below. 



This post contains Amazon Affiliate links. If you visit Amazon via the links and purchase items, I receive a small commission at no additional cost to you.

Read More Don’t Wait To Be Excellent…Start. Right. Now.





When we were planning for 1:1 at Bolivar High School, we had numerous community meetings and invited feedback and questions from our stakeholders. One of the questions that was raised went something like this, “How can you be sure student achievement will increase as a result of every kid having a device?”



And that’s a very good question, at least on the surface. It would seem reasonable that if a school is going to spend thousands of dollars on devices, there should be a direct correlation, even causation, in the research to demonstrate a positive effect on measurable learning outcomes. 



That question comes up again from time to time. Our middle school is now also working toward implementing their own version of 1:1.



The research on the impact of 1:1 programs is mixed. Some studies point to flat achievement or even declining achievement, especially with low-income and minority students. Other studies, like Project Red for instance, have found that schools implementing a 1:1 student-computer ratio along with key implementation factors outperform other schools.



But I’m a bit skeptical of studies on either side of this issue. It is very difficult to isolate any single factor or group of factors to show direct impact on measurable student achievement outcomes. There are so many moving parts in what students learn and to what extent they learn it.



I do believe that technology implemented properly CAN have a positive impact on student achievement. But I would also argue that there are many, many reasons to go digital in schools besides student achievement. And I mean student achievement in the narrowest sense. Everything we do is related to student achievement in my view, but researchers and bureaucrats usually examine this factor through a narrow lens of standardized test results.



Since I believe so strongly in the benefits of technology for students, I asked my PLN for feedback on what they believe are the most important reasons to go digital beyond strictly academic outcomes. I summarize the ideas below, and you can also check out their responses in the Twitter Moment embedded below.



15 Reasons #EdTech is Valuable Beyond Student Achievement



1. Essential to learning in a modern world.



Technology is just as essential to learning in today’s world as the school library. To be an effective learner in today’s world means you’re going to be using digital tools to learn.



2. Encourages lifelong learning.



Our school’s motto is Learning for Life. We believe in the importance of developing skills that will translate to life. If we want our students to be lifelong learners, they need to understand the role of technology in that.



3. Connects students and schools with the outside world.



These tweets from Ellen Deem and Kevin Foley summarize it nicely. Technology allows us to bring the world into our school, and take our school into the world.

@deem_ellen @DavidGeurin Technology has taken the world into my small school.It has also brought my small school to the world @TheSTEAMakers

— Kevin Foley (@FoleyKev) February 25, 2017



4. Reflects how work gets done outside of schools.



Almost every career, project, or activity will involve technology in some way. Having stronger skills related to technology brings value to most every area of life.



5. Allows for practicing digital citizenship.



How can we expect students to make good decisions and develop into responsible digital creators and consumers if we don’t give opportunities for practice in school?



6. Important for teaching digital literacy.



Students need to understand digital literacy as part of overall information literacy. It’s not enough to be able to read and write. You need to know how the digitally connected world works.



7. Important for practicing the 4 C’s.



If we are serious about teaching communication, collaboration, creativity, and critical thinking, technology is a great vehicle to explore those skills.



8. Kids like it.



I love this response from Melinda Miller. If we are serious about kids becoming independent learners, then learning needs to be exciting and fun.

@DavidGeurin kids like it!

— Melinda Miller (@mmiller7571) February 25, 2017

9. Improves communication.



We gain opportunities to communicate and connect within and outside our school through the use of email, social media, shared documents, etc. 



10. Improves student engagement



Technology can play an important role in increasing student engagement and creating more student-centered learning opportunities.



11. Provides an authentic audience for student work outside the school.



Student work shouldn’t be destined to finish in a trash can. It can be saved forever and shared with the world using digital tools.



12. Allows new ways to differentiate learning.



Technology is great for meeting individual learning needs. 



13. It can personalize learning.



Technology can create opportunities for students to pursue passions, make choices, and have their voice heard.



14. It creates efficiency.



With technology, we can use less paper, save time, and overcome the limitations of when and where we learn.



15. It supports curiosity.

Students have questions. A connected device provides the means to search for answers. Someone made the comment that tech has made us less curious. I don’t necessarily think that’s true.



Question: What are your thoughts on ways #EdTech impacts learning beyond student achievement? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. 



Also, be sure to check out all the tweets from my PLN in response to this topic. Thanks everyone for contributing!

Beyond Student Achievement

Read More 15 Reasons #EdTech Is Valuable Beyond Student Achievement





When we were planning for 1:1 at Bolivar High School, we had numerous community meetings and invited feedback and questions from our stakeholders. One of the questions that was raised went something like this, “How can you be sure student achievement will increase as a result of every kid having a device?”



And that’s a very good question, at least on the surface. It would seem reasonable that if a school is going to spend thousands of dollars on devices, there should be a direct correlation, even causation, in the research to demonstrate a positive effect on measurable learning outcomes. 



That question comes up again from time to time. Our middle school is now also working toward implementing their own version of 1:1.



The research on the impact of 1:1 programs is mixed. Some studies point to flat achievement or even declining achievement, especially with low-income and minority students. Other studies, like Project Red for instance, have found that schools implementing a 1:1 student-computer ratio along with key implementation factors outperform other schools.



But I’m a bit skeptical of studies on either side of this issue. It is very difficult to isolate any single factor or group of factors to show direct impact on measurable student achievement outcomes. There are so many moving parts in what students learn and to what extent they learn it.



I do believe that technology implemented properly CAN have a positive impact on student achievement. But I would also argue that there are many, many reasons to go digital in schools besides student achievement. And I mean student achievement in the narrowest sense. Everything we do is related to student achievement in my view, but researchers and bureaucrats usually examine this factor through a narrow lens of standardized test results.



Since I believe so strongly in the benefits of technology for students, I asked my PLN for feedback on what they believe are the most important reasons to go digital beyond strictly academic outcomes. I summarize the ideas below, and you can also check out their responses in the Twitter Moment embedded below.



15 Reasons #EdTech is Valuable Beyond Student Achievement



1. Essential to learning in a modern world.



Technology is just as essential to learning in today’s world as the school library. To be an effective learner in today’s world means you’re going to be using digital tools to learn.



2. Encourages lifelong learning.



Our school’s motto is Learning for Life. We believe in the importance of developing skills that will translate to life. If we want our students to be lifelong learners, they need to understand the role of technology in that.



3. Connects students and schools with the outside world.



These tweets from Ellen Deem and Kevin Foley summarize it nicely. Technology allows us to bring the world into our school, and take our school into the world.

@deem_ellen @DavidGeurin Technology has taken the world into my small school.It has also brought my small school to the world @TheSTEAMakers

— Kevin Foley (@FoleyKev) February 25, 2017



4. Reflects how work gets done outside of schools.



Almost every career, project, or activity will involve technology in some way. Having stronger skills related to technology brings value to most every area of life.



5. Allows for practicing digital citizenship.



How can we expect students to make good decisions and develop into responsible digital creators and consumers if we don’t give opportunities for practice in school?



6. Important for teaching digital literacy.



Students need to understand digital literacy as part of overall information literacy. It’s not enough to be able to read and write. You need to know how the digitally connected world works.



7. Important for practicing the 4 C’s.



If we are serious about teaching communication, collaboration, creativity, and critical thinking, technology is a great vehicle to explore those skills.



8. Kids like it.



I love this response from Melinda Miller. If we are serious about kids becoming independent learners, then learning needs to be exciting and fun.

@DavidGeurin kids like it!

— Melinda Miller (@mmiller7571) February 25, 2017

9. Improves communication.



We gain opportunities to communicate and connect within and outside our school through the use of email, social media, shared documents, etc. 



10. Improves student engagement



Technology can play an important role in increasing student engagement and creating more student-centered learning opportunities.



11. Provides an authentic audience for student work outside the school.



Student work shouldn’t be destined to finish in a trash can. It can be saved forever and shared with the world using digital tools.



12. Allows new ways to differentiate learning.



Technology is great for meeting individual learning needs. 



13. It can personalize learning.



Technology can create opportunities for students to pursue passions, make choices, and have their voice heard.



14. It creates efficiency.



With technology, we can use less paper, save time, and overcome the limitations of when and where we learn.



15. It supports curiosity.

Students have questions. A connected device provides the means to search for answers. Someone made the comment that tech has made us less curious. I don’t necessarily think that’s true.



Question: What are your thoughts on ways #EdTech impacts learning beyond student achievement? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. 



Also, be sure to check out all the tweets from my PLN in response to this topic. Thanks everyone for contributing!

Beyond Student Achievement

Read More 15 Reasons #EdTech Is Valuable Beyond Student Achievement





I use my iPhone to do most of my connecting through social media. I guess that trend is common since mobile device use is up while use of laptops/desktops is down worldwide. This chart illustrates how that trend is expected to continue.




Retrieved: http://digiday.com/media/mobile-overtaking-desktops-around-world-5-charts/





Social media has been transformational in my work as an educator. The connections I’ve made and the ideas I’ve encountered have pushed me to grow and learn in ways I never could’ve imagined.



But I also don’t want social media to take over my life. I work very hard to maximize my productivity and get the most out of my online work without compromising other important areas of my life.



These are 11 apps I’ve used that I’ve found most beneficial to managing my social media life. They aren’t in any particular order, and they serve a variety of purposes.



1. Twitter-I use the Twitter app to read tweets and post to multiple accounts (school and personal/professional). I sometimes even participate in Twitter chats using my iPhone. 



2. Buffer-This app is fantastic for scheduling tweets and managing multiple social media accounts. I like to read and share relevant content to my followers. I’ve found Buffer is the best way to do this. One of the things I like about it is the ability to follow RSS feeds within the app. It brings some of my favorite content right into the app so I can review and share.



3. Facebook Pages-I help manage content for our high school page, and I also have a Facebook fan page for my blog. I can take care of both accounts through this app’s interface. It works great!



4. Nuzzel-I use Nuzzel to read the hottest stories from my Twitter feed. Basically, it ranks articles that have been shared the most by my friends. I always find content here I want to share with others. It also works with Facebook. You just have to connect your accounts to the app.



5. Evernote-Anything I don’t want to forget goes in Evernote. It’s a great app for taking notes and staying organized. I keep a list of possible blog topics here also so I always have something to think and write about.



6. Juice-This app is another way I get content to read and share. It analyzes my Twitter and then generates new articles to read every 24 hours. I don’t think very many people know about this one, but I really like it.



7. Flipboard-I use Flipboard semi-regularly, but it often frustrates me. It’s supposed to aggregate relevant links and stories based on my interests. It’s algorithm is supposed to learn my preferences and habits. The problem is I don’t find helpful content there as often as I’d like. Am I doing something wrong? 



8. Vanillapen-This app is great for making quick and easy quote images. I like to share inspiring images or quotes and this makes it a breeze.



9. Pexels-You might share this app with your students too. It’s a great online platform for finding Creative Commons licensed photos to use in projects and presentations. You don’t want to violate copyright laws by choosing any photo from a Google search. The photos on this site are free and there are new pics added daily. 



10. Canva-I use Canva to create images for blog posts or to share on social media. Some of the graphics and images are fee based, but I use it often and rarely pay for anything.



11. TweetDeck-This tool is my favorite way to participate in Twitter chats. The simple column view allows users to monitor multiple accounts or hashtags all at once. For a chat, I typically have a column for the hashtag and one for my notifications so I know when someone has mentioned or tweeted at me.



I always enjoying new apps and have really benefited from the ones I’ve shared in this post. Having the right app is like finding the right tool in my shop. It makes every project turn out better!



Question: What are your favorite apps right now? I’m curious what works well for you. You can leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 11 Apps That Help Me Manage My Social Media Life





I use my iPhone to do most of my connecting through social media. I guess that trend is common since mobile device use is up while use of laptops/desktops is down worldwide. This chart illustrates how that trend is expected to continue.




Retrieved: http://digiday.com/media/mobile-overtaking-desktops-around-world-5-charts/





Social media has been transformational in my work as an educator. The connections I’ve made and the ideas I’ve encountered have pushed me to grow and learn in ways I never could’ve imagined.



But I also don’t want social media to take over my life. I work very hard to maximize my productivity and get the most out of my online work without compromising other important areas of my life.



These are 11 apps I’ve used that I’ve found most beneficial to managing my social media life. They aren’t in any particular order, and they serve a variety of purposes.



1. Twitter-I use the Twitter app to read tweets and post to multiple accounts (school and personal/professional). I sometimes even participate in Twitter chats using my iPhone. 



2. Buffer-This app is fantastic for scheduling tweets and managing multiple social media accounts. I like to read and share relevant content to my followers. I’ve found Buffer is the best way to do this. One of the things I like about it is the ability to follow RSS feeds within the app. It brings some of my favorite content right into the app so I can review and share.



3. Facebook Pages-I help manage content for our high school page, and I also have a Facebook fan page for my blog. I can take care of both accounts through this app’s interface. It works great!



4. Nuzzel-I use Nuzzel to read the hottest stories from my Twitter feed. Basically, it ranks articles that have been shared the most by my friends. I always find content here I want to share with others. It also works with Facebook. You just have to connect your accounts to the app.



5. Evernote-Anything I don’t want to forget goes in Evernote. It’s a great app for taking notes and staying organized. I keep a list of possible blog topics here also so I always have something to think and write about.



6. Juice-This app is another way I get content to read and share. It analyzes my Twitter and then generates new articles to read every 24 hours. I don’t think very many people know about this one, but I really like it.



7. Flipboard-I use Flipboard semi-regularly, but it often frustrates me. It’s supposed to aggregate relevant links and stories based on my interests. It’s algorithm is supposed to learn my preferences and habits. The problem is I don’t find helpful content there as often as I’d like. Am I doing something wrong? 



8. Vanillapen-This app is great for making quick and easy quote images. I like to share inspiring images or quotes and this makes it a breeze.



9. Pexels-You might share this app with your students too. It’s a great online platform for finding Creative Commons licensed photos to use in projects and presentations. You don’t want to violate copyright laws by choosing any photo from a Google search. The photos on this site are free and there are new pics added daily. 



10. Canva-I use Canva to create images for blog posts or to share on social media. Some of the graphics and images are fee based, but I use it often and rarely pay for anything.



11. TweetDeck-This tool is my favorite way to participate in Twitter chats. The simple column view allows users to monitor multiple accounts or hashtags all at once. For a chat, I typically have a column for the hashtag and one for my notifications so I know when someone has mentioned or tweeted at me.



I always enjoying new apps and have really benefited from the ones I’ve shared in this post. Having the right app is like finding the right tool in my shop. It makes every project turn out better!



Question: What are your favorite apps right now? I’m curious what works well for you. You can leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 11 Apps That Help Me Manage My Social Media Life