Tag: teaching

Across the globe schools are closing due to Covid-19 and the learning is being moved online. I recently shared in my Daily-Ink post, ‘Novel ideas can spread from a novel virus‘: Discussion about the possibility of remote learning invites questions about blended learning where some of the work, both asynchronous and synchronous, is done remotely. […]

Read More Just shifting online or shifting the learning?

I love the metaphor of ‘Teacher as compass’; helping students navigate their own learning journey. Last night I read this tweet from Will Richardson: Kids don’t need to be taught how to learn. (No one does.) Our job in schools is to create conditions where they can practice what they already know. To trust their […]

Read More Teacher as compass

From Wikipedia: Derek Anthony Redmond (born 3 September 1965) is a retired British athlete. During his career, he held the British record for the 400 metres sprint, and won gold medals in the 4×400 metres relay at the World Championships and European Championships.[1] I don’t know what brought me back to the story of Derek … [Read more…]

Read More With the Support of Others

It’s that time of year again for hiring and job searches! Whether you are conducting an interview or being interviewed, I have found some common expectations anyone should have when walking into an education interview. If you are looking for sample questions specific to principal interviews, let me encourage you to check out the post, […]

Read More PMP:Encore027 Ten Tips for Interviewing for an Education Opening

Have a look at this study of a bull by Pablo Picasso: It starts off with intricate drawings and step by step Picasso moves from detail to just the essence of what a bull is, using just a handful of lines. Sometimes we have to ‘cut the bull’… We have to look at the essence […]

Read More Cut the Bull

Alec Couros shared this on Facebook: Every “new” revolution or trend in education is inevitably accompanied by the critics who wisely note “We tried this back in the x0’s. If you want change to happen and to stick, engage your historians to better understand why things failed the first time around. I then shared his post on […]

Read More Been there, done that? Actually, no.

I was listening to an interview between Daniel Bauer and Jethro Jones the other day on Daniel’s Better Leaders, Better Schools podcast. Daniel asked Jethro, an Alaska principal, “What is one of your regrets from your time at your school?” I really liked Jethro’s response because he focused on how relationships were such an important […]

Read More PMP:063 Reflecting on Regrets & Rewards

As educators, we often refer to ‘Wait Time’ as the time between when you ask a question and when you expect an answer. Cast out a question to your class and if you don’t provide wait time, then when the first student begins to answer (takes a bite), all your other students are ‘off the […]

Read More Questioning Your Inquiry

If we had to host our own detentions… how many would we write? how would we want student behavior impacted as a result? how would we work toward achieving that…

Read More The Power of Detentions

We’ve run 2 staff meetings this year using an #edcamp format. They were very well-received, productive, successful, and provided instant feedback for staff and/or immediate classroom learning opportunities for kids.…

Read More Things That Suck!

It takes a lot from us educators to provide our kids, communities, and each other with the learning experiences we deserve. Two qualities that are near the top are reflection…

Read More Reflect with Humility

I’m a fan of a to-do list. (Especially if it’s on lined, monogrammed paper!) I highly enjoy crossing things off as I accomplish them, it just makes me feel as…

Read More

flickr image via ephotography “Always smile back at little children. To ignore them is to destroy their belief that the world is good.” ~ Pam Brown This fall I began…

Read More Smile, the world is good…