Tag: Strategies

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Once I was working with an entire class of freshmen at the beginning of a school year, and one of the kids made some kind of wise-guy comment in front of the whole group. I don’t remember exactly what he said, but I do remembe…

Read More How to Respond When You Feel Disrespected

The focus of traditional education has mostly been on knowledge. The focus has been on learning more information. But now we have more information available to us than ever before. And the amount of information out there is growing exponentially…

Read More Knowing vs. Understanding vs. Applying

Whether you’re a teacher or a principal, or have another role as an educator, you probably have interactions on a daily basis that involve complaints coming your way. The complaints might come from students, parents, or colleagues. These interactions…

Read More 11 Phrases to Effectively Respond to Complaining

Students who are in trouble almost always have a good reason for why they did what they did. Sometimes a student will admit fault and take full ownership, but that’s not usually the case, especially for students who habitually shift responsibility. U…

Read More Never Ask a Student This Question About Their Behavior

Earlier this summer our district leadership team spent a day of training together around the Clifton Strengths Assessment. It was really interesting to learn more about self and others and how to leverage our individual and collective strengths to make our impact for kids stronger.



Of my top five strengths, I was a little disappointed to learn that none of them fell into the larger category of Relationship Building. 



That’s right, I often write about how much I value relationships and how important they are, but connecting is not a natural strength for meat least not in my top 5 according to this instrument. 



Our trainer was really helpful in explaining that just because something isn’t a natural strength doesn’t mean you’re not good at it, or that you don’t find value in it. It just requires more effort and intention to be good at it. When you believe strongly in something, you can be effective in it even when it’s not near the top of your strengths.



That was encouraging to me. 



My top 5 strengths were 1. Learner, 2. Activator, 3. Belief, 4. Futuristic (sounds like a familiar book title), and 5. Self-Assurance. These are all areas where I get energy, where I thrive.



But I also realize that relationships are the most important part of what I do. I can’t be effective as an educator or as a human being for that matter, unless relationships are my number one priority. So I will remain intentional about how I strive to connect with others.



I’ve noticed sometimes when I interact with students I feel like I’m saying the same things over and over. Just simply exchanging pleasantries, smiling, nodding, fist-bumping, etc. And then maybe I’ll ask about last night’s game or how their classes are going.



I’ve also noticed that while we often talk about how important relationships are in education, we don’t always share specific strategies for how to build relationships and connect in the middle of all those interactions we have every day. 



But I read an article recently about a study by psychologist Arthur Aron that described how certain questions have proven to build connection between people. And while the questions were designed to be used in a single 45 minute conversation, I’m wondering about how some of these questions might be helpful to me in working with students or colleagues, perhaps in shorter time frames. 



Some of the questions seemed more fitting than others. I thought I would share a few here in case you’re like me and looking for ways to make your conversations more meaningful. The questions were divided into sets based on the level of vulnerability they might require.



I think they might even be good for staff meetings to build more connection and teamwork among teachers. When we share together we grow stronger together.



Set 1



1. Would you like to be famous? In what way?



2. What would constitute a “perfect” day for you?



3. For what in your life do you feel most grateful?



4. If you could wake up tomorrow having gained any one quality or ability, what would it be?



Set 2



5. What is the greatest accomplishment of your life?



6. What do you value most in a friendship?



7. What is your most treasured memory?



8. Is there something you’ve dreamed of doing for a long time? Why haven’t you done it?



Set 3



9. Your house, containing everything you own, catches fire. After saving your loved ones and pets, you have time to safely make a final dash to save any one item. What would it be? Why?



10. When did you last cry in front of another person? By yourself?



11. Make three true “we” statements each. For instance, “We are both in this room feeling…”



There were actually 36 questions total. I’m just sharing a few of the ones that seemed most likely that I might use. I would definitely be uncomfortable asking students, or even colleagues, a few of the questions that were included in the larger group, especially from Set 3. 



You might want to check out the full list of 36 questions and the protocol for the entire activity. You might find some other questions you like for your classroom or school. Or, you might want to try the entire process for date night with your significant other. Enjoy!

What are other questions or topics you rely on to foster connection? I would love to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 11 Questions that Build Relationships and Foster Connection



“How did you become a Chicago Cubs fan?”



I asked the question to a Cubs fan I was visiting with recently. And I wasn’t being sarcastic, since I’m a St. Louis Cardinals fan, and that would be on point for fan behavior between the two teams.



No, I was just curious because he wasn’t from a part of the country that isn’t typically considered Cubs fan territory. He explained that some members of his family were Cubs fans but what really hooked him on the Cubs was when he attended a game at Wrigley Field (Chicago) as a young boy.



That experience, he said, was something he never forgot and resulted in his lifelong love of the Cubs. It was as simple as that.



Experiences are powerful. They can change our entire perspective for good or bad. In this case, a positive experience resulted in a deep attachment to a baseball team.



I’m wondering about how students experience school. Are we creating experiences that result in a lifelong attachment to learning? Are we creating powerful learning experiences that develop curiosity and cultivate interests?



While much of my own school experience was somewhat routine and mostly forgettable, there were some amazing experiences that really led me to want to learn more.



Most of those memorable experiences were projects or trips to visit interesting places. I remember visiting a cave, a Civil War battlefield, and even a museum with a real mummy, all part of opportunities through school.



I also remember creating a news broadcast and interviewing people from our community, as part of a project for class. I also remember competing in a stock market game, and I remember performing a classroom play.



I don’t remember a single lecture from school. I take that back. I remember one very gifted social studies teacher who could tell stories from the Civil War that were so interesting I wanted to learn more on my own. He had us on the edge of our seats.



I don’t remember any worksheet tasks standing out. I don’t remember any tests in particular. 



Here’s the thing. I’m not saying tests, or assignments, or routine work are all bad in school. I’m not saying they don’t have value. But if we want our students to be inspired learners, we better look for ways to connect learning to positive emotions. We better give students experiences that really capture their attention in ways that go far beyond the routine.



In a time where standards mastery seems to be at the top of all priorities, I wonder what types of experiences kids are having? 



What type of experience are they having when remediation has been routine for them year after year in school?



What type of experience are they having when they don’t have the opportunity to pursue things they’re interested in?



What type of experience are they having when they don’t get to learn outside the classroom by taking field trips?



A couple of high school principals were discussing how they are making sure any field trips in their school tie directly to meeting standards. I guess that’s one way to look at it.



But for me, I want our students to have as many opportunities as possible to learn and interact with interesting people and places away from our school campus. I especially want that for our under-resourced students who might not ever have those opportunities otherwise.



There is a time for rolling up our sleeves and doing the routine work of learning and life. But if we’re not also creating peak moments along the way, we are missing the joy in the journey. 



And we’re probably missing out on potential passions, and maybe even missing out on developing a passion for learning.



The routine work should flow from a deep sense of purpose. We need to know our why. That’s where lasting learning is nurtured.



As I wrote in my book, Future Driven,

Don’t just create lessons for your students. Create experiences. Students will forget a lesson, but an experience will have lasting value. We want to do more than cover content. We want to inspire learning.

Is your school making time for powerful learning experiences? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.





Read More Don’t Just Plan Lessons, Create Experiences



How do you respond when students don’t exhibit the behaviors you would like to see? Do you tell students they need to change? Do you lecture them about responsibility or respect? Do you complain to your colleagues about kids these days? Do you punish or reward?



How effective are those options? Telling doesn’t work. Lectures create distance. Complaining doesn’t empower anyone. And rewards and punishments mostly work only to get compliance and not to build better better behavioral skills.



But what would be an effective response to harmful behaviors? 



What can educators do to better address non-learning behaviors? 



Teaching behavior is better than just punishing behavior.



Teach the students the new behaviors you want to see.



If they aren’t organized, teach them how to be organized.



If they aren’t respectful, teach them about respect and how to show it.



If they aren’t responsible, teach them new skills to show responsibility.



If they are distracted, teach them how to focus.



Break down any behavior into specific skills and teach your students the steps to successfully exhibit the behaviors.



How to Teach Behavior



1. Know your own expectations for your students. Have a vision for exactly what you expect. Know exactly what you want to see.



2. Communicate your expectations clearly. Be very specific. Over communicate. Explain why the behavior is important. Use stories and examples to make it clear.



3. Build relationships. Students will always learn behavior lessons better from someone that’s trusted and connected.



4. Discuss unwanted behaviors with your students. Don’t tell. Ask questions. Listen. Understand.



5. Give students feedback on how they’re doing. Correct them. Direct them. But most of all, encourage them.



6. Facilitate reflection with your students. Ask them to think about their own behavior and how they are learning and growing. Track progress.



7. Offer a fresh start each day. Don’t bring up previous mistakes except as a teaching opportunity but never to shame or gain the upper hand. Be patient.



8. Always protect the dignity of each child. Don’t lose your cool and say something harmful. Don’t use shame or guilt to motivate. 



How would you treat him/her if his/her grandmother were watching?



9. Review. It’s always good to circle back around to important lessons about expectations and how things are going.



What if I don’t have time to teach behavior?



Better question: What if you DON’T take the time to teach behavior? If you don’t teach the behaviors you want to see, you’ll spend much more time correcting issues that might have been prevented. Make sure your expectations are clear.



When you are intentional about teaching the behaviors you want to see, you are being proactive instead of reactive. You don’t just wait until there is a problem. Try to see things from the student’s perspective and anticipate what reminders they might need.



What do you do to be proactive about teaching behaviors in your classroom? Share your strategies by leaving a comment below or responding on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Importance of Teaching the Behaviors You Want to See



How do you respond when students don’t exhibit the behaviors you would like to see? Do you tell students they need to change? Do you lecture them about responsibility or respect? Do you complain to your colleagues about kids these days? Do you punish or reward?



How effective are those options? Telling doesn’t work. Lectures create distance. Complaining doesn’t empower anyone. And rewards and punishments mostly work only to get compliance and not to build better better behavioral skills.



But what would be an effective response to harmful behaviors? 



What can educators do to better address non-learning behaviors? 



Teaching behavior is better than just punishing behavior.



Teach the students the new behaviors you want to see.



If they aren’t organized, teach them how to be organized.



If they aren’t respectful, teach them about respect and how to show it.



If they aren’t responsible, teach them new skills to show responsibility.



If they are distracted, teach them how to focus.



Break down any behavior into specific skills and teach your students the steps to successfully exhibit the behaviors.



How to Teach Behavior



1. Know your own expectations for your students. Have a vision for exactly what you expect. Know exactly what you want to see.



2. Communicate your expectations clearly. Be very specific. Over communicate. Explain why the behavior is important. Use stories and examples to make it clear.



3. Build relationships. Students will always learn behavior lessons better from someone that’s trusted and connected.



4. Discuss unwanted behaviors with your students. Don’t tell. Ask questions. Listen. Understand.



5. Give students feedback on how they’re doing. Correct them. Direct them. But most of all, encourage them.



6. Facilitate reflection with your students. Ask them to think about their own behavior and how they are learning and growing. Track progress.



7. Offer a fresh start each day. Don’t bring up previous mistakes except as a teaching opportunity but never to shame or gain the upper hand. Be patient.



8. Always protect the dignity of each child. Don’t lose your cool and say something harmful. Don’t use shame or guilt to motivate. 



How would you treat him/her if his/her grandmother were watching?



9. Review. It’s always good to circle back around to important lessons about expectations and how things are going.



What if I don’t have time to teach behavior?



Better question: What if you DON’T take the time to teach behavior? If you don’t teach the behaviors you want to see, you’ll spend much more time correcting issues that might have been prevented. Make sure your expectations are clear.



When you are intentional about teaching the behaviors you want to see, you are being proactive instead of reactive. You don’t just wait until there is a problem. Try to see things from the student’s perspective and anticipate what reminders they might need.



What do you do to be proactive about teaching behaviors in your classroom? Share your strategies by leaving a comment below or responding on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Importance of Teaching the Behaviors You Want to See



Reflection is important for growth. But we have to be intentional about it. Our reflection is meaningless unless we do something with it. It has to change us. Or, it has to help us change directions. Effective people are reflective people.



Many years ago I read Dale Carnegie’s incredible book, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Just this last week, I decided to start reading it again. Carnegie tells the story of a bank president who for many years made it a practice to reflect at the end of each week on every appointment he had in the previous week. He would ask himself the following questions:



“What mistakes did I make that time?”



“What did I do that was right–and in what way could I have improved my performance?”



“What lessons can I learn from that experience?”



The banker attributed his great success in large part to his system:

I often found that this weekly review made me very unhappy. I was frequently astonished at my own blunders. Of course, as the years passed, these blunders became less frequent. Sometimes I was inclined to pat myself on the back a little after one of these sessions. This system of self-analysis, self-education, that continued year after year, did more for me than any other one thing I have ever attempted.

It helped me improve my ability to make decisions–and it aided me enormously in all my contacts with people. I cannot recommend it too highly. 

I also try to make it a point to consistently reflect on how things are going in my work. However, I don’t have a process as systematic as what’s described by the banker. Maybe that’s something I should consider.



This week as I’m reflecting, I thought of a few more questions to consider…



1. How is the reluctant learner experiencing our school (or your classroom if you’re a teacher)?



We may think about how our students are doing overall, but I think we need to be especially attentive to how the reluctant learner is doing. If we create an experience that engages some of our most challenging students, that same experience will also probably benefit our other students too. We’re aiming to create a place where even kids who “hate school” love to learn.



2. Am I measuring with a yardstick of my own years?



When I get frustrated with some of the behaviors I see in students, I need to be reminded that they are often acting exactly like 15-year-olds are inclined to act. That doesn’t mean that I don’t try to influence them to rise up, but I can’t get frustrated when they don’t think, or act, like me. That sounds ridiculous doesn’t it? But I think we all tend to get frustrated if people don’t act just like we think they should.



3. Do I have a healthy level of dissatisfaction with my own performance?



At the end of the day, it’s important to be content with doing my best but to also be dissatisfied with how things are. I don’t want to become complacent. And I don’t want to beat myself up when I make a mistake. So be content, but never be satisfied. 



4. Are there ways I’m falling into binary thinking?



Binary thinking creates false dichotomies. It’s either/or. Effective leadership almost always requires a more nuanced position. We can have fun AND have high expectations. We can use technology AND develop social skills and teamwork. We can encourage student agency/inquiry AND improve achievement. It’s not all or nothing.



5. What specific strategies am I using to motivate students (and teachers)?



I’m thinking about the ways I influence student and teacher motivation. Am I doing it by connecting and building relationships? Am I doing it by clearing barriers and showing support? Am I motivating students by creating a positive environment? Just what are the specific strategies I’m using to motivate? Food for thought.



So how are you developing a reflection routine? Would you benefit from having intentional reflection each week? Let me know what you think. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 5 Questions for Deeper Reflection



Reflection is important for growth. But we have to be intentional about it. Our reflection is meaningless unless we do something with it. It has to change us. Or, it has to help us change directions. Effective people are reflective people.



Many years ago I read Dale Carnegie’s incredible book, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Just this last week, I decided to start reading it again. Carnegie tells the story of a bank president who for many years made it a practice to reflect at the end of each week on every appointment he had in the previous week. He would ask himself the following questions:



“What mistakes did I make that time?”



“What did I do that was right–and in what way could I have improved my performance?”



“What lessons can I learn from that experience?”



The banker attributed his great success in large part to his system:

I often found that this weekly review made me very unhappy. I was frequently astonished at my own blunders. Of course, as the years passed, these blunders became less frequent. Sometimes I was inclined to pat myself on the back a little after one of these sessions. This system of self-analysis, self-education, that continued year after year, did more for me than any other one thing I have ever attempted.

It helped me improve my ability to make decisions–and it aided me enormously in all my contacts with people. I cannot recommend it too highly. 

I also try to make it a point to consistently reflect on how things are going in my work. However, I don’t have a process as systematic as what’s described by the banker. Maybe that’s something I should consider.



This week as I’m reflecting, I thought of a few more questions to consider…



1. How is the reluctant learner experiencing our school (or your classroom if you’re a teacher)?



We may think about how our students are doing overall, but I think we need to be especially attentive to how the reluctant learner is doing. If we create an experience that engages some of our most challenging students, that same experience will also probably benefit our other students too. We’re aiming to create a place where even kids who “hate school” love to learn.



2. Am I measuring with a yardstick of my own years?



When I get frustrated with some of the behaviors I see in students, I need to be reminded that they are often acting exactly like 15-year-olds are inclined to act. That doesn’t mean that I don’t try to influence them to rise up, but I can’t get frustrated when they don’t think, or act, like me. That sounds ridiculous doesn’t it? But I think we all tend to get frustrated if people don’t act just like we think they should.



3. Do I have a healthy level of dissatisfaction with my own performance?



At the end of the day, it’s important to be content with doing my best but to also be dissatisfied with how things are. I don’t want to become complacent. And I don’t want to beat myself up when I make a mistake. So be content, but never be satisfied. 



4. Are there ways I’m falling into binary thinking?



Binary thinking creates false dichotomies. It’s either/or. Effective leadership almost always requires a more nuanced position. We can have fun AND have high expectations. We can use technology AND develop social skills and teamwork. We can encourage student agency/inquiry AND improve achievement. It’s not all or nothing.



5. What specific strategies am I using to motivate students (and teachers)?



I’m thinking about the ways I influence student and teacher motivation. Am I doing it by connecting and building relationships? Am I doing it by clearing barriers and showing support? Am I motivating students by creating a positive environment? Just what are the specific strategies I’m using to motivate? Food for thought.



So how are you developing a reflection routine? Would you benefit from having intentional reflection each week? Let me know what you think. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 5 Questions for Deeper Reflection



Reflection is important for growth. But we have to be intentional about it. Our reflection is meaningless unless we do something with it. It has to change us. Or, it has to help us change directions. Effective people are reflective people.



Many years ago I read Dale Carnegie’s incredible book, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Just this last week, I decided to start reading it again. Carnegie tells the story of a bank president who for many years made it a practice to reflect at the end of each week on every appointment he had in the previous week. He would ask himself the following questions:



“What mistakes did I make that time?”



“What did I do that was right–and in what way could I have improved my performance?”



“What lessons can I learn from that experience?”



The banker attributed his great success in large part to his system:

I often found that this weekly review made me very unhappy. I was frequently astonished at my own blunders. Of course, as the years passed, these blunders became less frequent. Sometimes I was inclined to pat myself on the back a little after one of these sessions. This system of self-analysis, self-education, that continued year after year, did more for me than any other one thing I have ever attempted.

It helped me improve my ability to make decisions–and it aided me enormously in all my contacts with people. I cannot recommend it too highly. 

I also try to make it a point to consistently reflect on how things are going in my work. However, I don’t have a process as systematic as what’s described by the banker. Maybe that’s something I should consider.



This week as I’m reflecting, I thought of a few more questions to consider…



1. How is the reluctant learner experiencing our school (or your classroom if you’re a teacher)?



We may think about how our students are doing overall, but I think we need to be especially attentive to how the reluctant learner is doing. If we create an experience that engages some of our most challenging students, that same experience will also probably benefit our other students too. We’re aiming to create a place where even kids who “hate school” love to learn.



2. Am I measuring with a yardstick of my own years?



When I get frustrated with some of the behaviors I see in students, I need to be reminded that they are often acting exactly like 15-year-olds are inclined to act. That doesn’t mean that I don’t try to influence them to rise up, but I can’t get frustrated when they don’t think, or act, like me. That sounds ridiculous doesn’t it? But I think we all tend to get frustrated if people don’t act just like we think they should.



3. Do I have a healthy level of dissatisfaction with my own performance?



At the end of the day, it’s important to be content with doing my best but to also be dissatisfied with how things are. I don’t want to become complacent. And I don’t want to beat myself up when I make a mistake. So be content, but never be satisfied. 



4. Are there ways I’m falling into binary thinking?



Binary thinking creates false dichotomies. It’s either/or. Effective leadership almost always requires a more nuanced position. We can have fun AND have high expectations. We can use technology AND develop social skills and teamwork. We can encourage student agency/inquiry AND improve achievement. It’s not all or nothing.



5. What specific strategies am I using to motivate students (and teachers)?



I’m thinking about the ways I influence student and teacher motivation. Am I doing it by connecting and building relationships? Am I doing it by clearing barriers and showing support? Am I motivating students by creating a positive environment? Just what are the specific strategies I’m using to motivate? Food for thought.



So how are you developing a reflection routine? Would you benefit from having intentional reflection each week? Let me know what you think. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 5 Questions for Deeper Reflection



Reflection is important for growth. But we have to be intentional about it. Our reflection is meaningless unless we do something with it. It has to change us. Or, it has to help us change directions. Effective people are reflective people.



Many years ago I read Dale Carnegie’s incredible book, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Just this last week, I decided to start reading it again. Carnegie tells the story of a bank president who for many years made it a practice to reflect at the end of each week on every appointment he had in the previous week. He would ask himself the following questions:



“What mistakes did I make that time?”



“What did I do that was right–and in what way could I have improved my performance?”



“What lessons can I learn from that experience?”



The banker attributed his great success in large part to his system:

I often found that this weekly review made me very unhappy. I was frequently astonished at my own blunders. Of course, as the years passed, these blunders became less frequent. Sometimes I was inclined to pat myself on the back a little after one of these sessions. This system of self-analysis, self-education, that continued year after year, did more for me than any other one thing I have ever attempted.

It helped me improve my ability to make decisions–and it aided me enormously in all my contacts with people. I cannot recommend it too highly. 

I also try to make it a point to consistently reflect on how things are going in my work. However, I don’t have a process as systematic as what’s described by the banker. Maybe that’s something I should consider.



This week as I’m reflecting, I thought of a few more questions to consider…



1. How is the reluctant learner experiencing our school (or your classroom if you’re a teacher)?



We may think about how our students are doing overall, but I think we need to be especially attentive to how the reluctant learner is doing. If we create an experience that engages some of our most challenging students, that same experience will also probably benefit our other students too. We’re aiming to create a place where even kids who “hate school” love to learn.



2. Am I measuring with a yardstick of my own years?



When I get frustrated with some of the behaviors I see in students, I need to be reminded that they are often acting exactly like 15-year-olds are inclined to act. That doesn’t mean that I don’t try to influence them to rise up, but I can’t get frustrated when they don’t think, or act, like me. That sounds ridiculous doesn’t it? But I think we all tend to get frustrated if people don’t act just like we think they should.



3. Do I have a healthy level of dissatisfaction with my own performance?



At the end of the day, it’s important to be content with doing my best but to also be dissatisfied with how things are. I don’t want to become complacent. And I don’t want to beat myself up when I make a mistake. So be content, but never be satisfied. 



4. Are there ways I’m falling into binary thinking?



Binary thinking creates false dichotomies. It’s either/or. Effective leadership almost always requires a more nuanced position. We can have fun AND have high expectations. We can use technology AND develop social skills and teamwork. We can encourage student agency/inquiry AND improve achievement. It’s not all or nothing.



5. What specific strategies am I using to motivate students (and teachers)?



I’m thinking about the ways I influence student and teacher motivation. Am I doing it by connecting and building relationships? Am I doing it by clearing barriers and showing support? Am I motivating students by creating a positive environment? Just what are the specific strategies I’m using to motivate? Food for thought.



So how are you developing a reflection routine? Would you benefit from having intentional reflection each week? Let me know what you think. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 5 Questions for Deeper Reflection



Teaching is a challenging and exhausting profession. No one can understand what it’s like until you’ve experienced it. You make untold numbers of decisions every day. You work with kids who have all sorts of unique and sometimes unrelenting needs. 



The pressure is real. Sometimes it feels like you’re just treading water and then someone hands you a concrete block. So you better be a great swimmer! Ha.



I hear lots of ideas about educators dealing with stress. You need to make time for yourself. You need to recharge in the summer and on weekends. You need to have a healthy work/life balance. All of those things are probably true.



But for me, the biggest thing that helps me stay positive, productive, and energized is daily renewal. And that comes in the form of my morning routine and my mental approach throughout the day. I’m renewing in the morning and then I’m renewing by disciplining my thoughts throughout the day.



For the past couple of months, I’ve really focused on my making my mornings more effective. I’ve always tried to have a routine in the morning, but last school year at times I wasn’t as diligent. And I could definitely tell a difference.



More recently, I’m making my mornings count, and everything I’m doing seems to be working better. I feel more effective. I have more energy. My relationships are stronger. I’m more patient. More productive. More focused. More determined. I feel stronger overall.



So here’s what I’m doing differently. I don’t do every single one of these things every morning, but I do several of them each day. Being able to pick and choose gives my routine some variety. The routine can take me an hour or more, but there have been mornings I needed to get to school early, and I’ve done an abbreviated version in 10 minutes.



1. Smile



Start the day by finding something to smile about. Choose to smile. Research has shown the physical act of smiling has benefits for stress recovery, improved mood, and creativity. (Time: 30 seconds)



2. Breathe



I’m using a meditation app to work on focused breathing and meditation. There are several smartphone apps available, and I’ve tried a couple of them. Practicing mindfulness is great for increased focus, reduced anxiety, and improved cognition. (Time: 3-5 minutes)

3. Be Grateful



Gratitude is powerful for feeling better, having more energy, and training your brain to look for good things. I follow the advice of author MK Mueller. Be grateful for three things that have happened in the last 24 hours with no repeats ever. It’s great to share your gratitude with someone or journal about it. (Time: 3-5 minutes)



4. Move



This one I’m including every day in my routine. I do something to be physically active each morning. It might be running several miles. Or, it might be a two-minute plank and that’s all. But I’m getting some type of exercise in my routine every morning. (Time: 2 minutes-1 hour)



5. Envision



Almost all great athletes use mental imagery to gain an edge. When you imagine exactly how you want a situation, interaction, event, or performance to go, it creates a mental model for success. It sets the stage for success. I spend a few moments each morning thinking about desired outcomes. I think about these things as if the outcome has already been established, as if they are already true. I think it until I feel it. (Time 2-5 minutes) 



6. Affirm



This practice is similar to envisioning except it is focused on self more than situation. So I’m thinking about characteristics I’m developing in myself as if they are already present at the desired level. I tell myself the things that I value and that I want to become. It helps clarify my values and focuses my growth. (Time 2-5 minutes)



7. Read



Like movement and exercise, I also make reading part of every morning. I keep a list of books to read and have several people in my life who share book suggestions with me. I also try to read blog posts and, of course, Twitter posts from my PLN. I can’t imagine not making reading a habit in my life. The things I continually learn add so much value to who I am and what I am striving to accomplish in life. (Time 15-45 minutes)



8. Reflect



I often think back over recent events during my morning routine. I think about decisions or interactions and what I can learn from them. What’s working? What’s not working? I’m careful not to beat myself up if something didn’t go well. I simply consider what I could do better next time and keep my focus on the future. If I can’t do something to improve myself or the situation, then I’m not going to continue thinking about it. Worry and regret is disempowering. I want to spend my time thinking in empowered ways. (Time 2-5 minutes)



9. Pray



If you’re not a person of faith, you may choose to skip right over this one. I don’t want to push my faith on anyone. I realize a person’s beliefs about God are…well, deeply personal. But I must share this part of my morning, because for me, spending time in prayer is the most valuable part of my daily routine. I have a list of things I pray about each morning. They are things that are very important to me. I must also share that my prayer life often intersects with each of the other parts of my routine. My whole morning routine is basically my focused time with God. So I’m often praying while I’m exercising or reflecting. I want to start my day by meeting with God, so I’m more effective as I meet with people throughout the day. (Time 5-10 minutes)



I realize this seems like a long list of things to do, especially if you don’t like getting up early in the morning. Keep in mind I don’t do all of these every day. And the amount of time I spend on each one varies also. 



If you want to reduce stress, have more energy, and increase your effectiveness, I highly recommend developing your morning routine. How you spend the first hour of your day will have a big impact on how the rest of your day goes. Make it count.



What are some of your morning routines? Are you intentional about daily renewal? What are your thoughts about reducing stress and increasing your effectiveness? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Importance of Daily Renewal for Educators



Teaching is a challenging and exhausting profession. No one can understand what it’s like until you’ve experienced it. You make untold numbers of decisions every day. You work with kids who have all sorts of unique and sometimes unrelenting needs. 



The pressure is real. Sometimes it feels like you’re just treading water and then someone hands you a concrete block. So you better be a great swimmer! Ha.



I hear lots of ideas about educators dealing with stress. You need to make time for yourself. You need to recharge in the summer and on weekends. You need to have a healthy work/life balance. All of those things are probably true.



But for me, the biggest thing that helps me stay positive, productive, and energized is daily renewal. And that comes in the form of my morning routine and my mental approach throughout the day. I’m renewing in the morning and then I’m renewing by disciplining my thoughts throughout the day.



For the past couple of months, I’ve really focused on my making my mornings more effective. I’ve always tried to have a routine in the morning, but last school year at times I wasn’t as diligent. And I could definitely tell a difference.



More recently, I’m making my mornings count, and everything I’m doing seems to be working better. I feel more effective. I have more energy. My relationships are stronger. I’m more patient. More productive. More focused. More determined. I feel stronger overall.



So here’s what I’m doing differently. I don’t do every single one of these things every morning, but I do several of them each day. Being able to pick and choose gives my routine some variety. The routine can take me an hour or more, but there have been mornings I needed to get to school early, and I’ve done an abbreviated version in 10 minutes.



1. Smile



Start the day by finding something to smile about. Choose to smile. Research has shown the physical act of smiling has benefits for stress recovery, improved mood, and creativity. (Time: 30 seconds)



2. Breathe



I’m using a meditation app to work on focused breathing and meditation. There are several smartphone apps available, and I’ve tried a couple of them. Practicing mindfulness is great for increased focus, reduced anxiety, and improved cognition. (Time: 3-5 minutes)

3. Be Grateful



Gratitude is powerful for feeling better, having more energy, and training your brain to look for good things. I follow the advice of author MK Mueller. Be grateful for three things that have happened in the last 24 hours with no repeats ever. It’s great to share your gratitude with someone or journal about it. (Time: 3-5 minutes)



4. Move



This one I’m including every day in my routine. I do something to be physically active each morning. It might be running several miles. Or, it might be a two-minute plank and that’s all. But I’m getting some type of exercise in my routine every morning. (Time: 2 minutes-1 hour)



5. Envision



Almost all great athletes use mental imagery to gain an edge. When you imagine exactly how you want a situation, interaction, event, or performance to go, it creates a mental model for success. It sets the stage for success. I spend a few moments each morning thinking about desired outcomes. I think about these things as if the outcome has already been established, as if they are already true. I think it until I feel it. (Time 2-5 minutes) 



6. Affirm



This practice is similar to envisioning except it is focused on self more than situation. So I’m thinking about characteristics I’m developing in myself as if they are already present at the desired level. I tell myself the things that I value and that I want to become. It helps clarify my values and focuses my growth. (Time 2-5 minutes)



7. Read



Like movement and exercise, I also make reading part of every morning. I keep a list of books to read and have several people in my life who share book suggestions with me. I also try to read blog posts and, of course, Twitter posts from my PLN. I can’t imagine not making reading a habit in my life. The things I continually learn add so much value to who I am and what I am striving to accomplish in life. (Time 15-45 minutes)



8. Reflect



I often think back over recent events during my morning routine. I think about decisions or interactions and what I can learn from them. What’s working? What’s not working? I’m careful not to beat myself up if something didn’t go well. I simply consider what I could do better next time and keep my focus on the future. If I can’t do something to improve myself or the situation, then I’m not going to continue thinking about it. Worry and regret is disempowering. I want to spend my time thinking in empowered ways. (Time 2-5 minutes)



9. Pray



If you’re not a person of faith, you may choose to skip right over this one. I don’t want to push my faith on anyone. I realize a person’s beliefs about God are…well, deeply personal. But I must share this part of my morning, because for me, spending time in prayer is the most valuable part of my daily routine. I have a list of things I pray about each morning. They are things that are very important to me. I must also share that my prayer life often intersects with each of the other parts of my routine. My whole morning routine is basically my focused time with God. So I’m often praying while I’m exercising or reflecting. I want to start my day by meeting with God, so I’m more effective as I meet with people throughout the day. (Time 5-10 minutes)



I realize this seems like a long list of things to do, especially if you don’t like getting up early in the morning. Keep in mind I don’t do all of these every day. And the amount of time I spend on each one varies also. 



If you want to reduce stress, have more energy, and increase your effectiveness, I highly recommend developing your morning routine. How you spend the first hour of your day will have a big impact on how the rest of your day goes. Make it count.



What are some of your morning routines? Are you intentional about daily renewal? What are your thoughts about reducing stress and increasing your effectiveness? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Importance of Daily Renewal for Educators



Teaching is a challenging and exhausting profession. No one can understand what it’s like until you’ve experienced it. You make untold numbers of decisions every day. You work with kids who have all sorts of unique and sometimes unrelenting needs. 



The pressure is real. Sometimes it feels like you’re just treading water and then someone hands you a concrete block. So you better be a great swimmer! Ha.



I hear lots of ideas about educators dealing with stress. You need to make time for yourself. You need to recharge in the summer and on weekends. You need to have a healthy work/life balance. All of those things are probably true.



But for me, the biggest thing that helps me stay positive, productive, and energized is daily renewal. And that comes in the form of my morning routine and my mental approach throughout the day. I’m renewing in the morning and then I’m renewing by disciplining my thoughts throughout the day.



For the past couple of months, I’ve really focused on my making my mornings more effective. I’ve always tried to have a routine in the morning, but last school year at times I wasn’t as diligent. And I could definitely tell a difference.



More recently, I’m making my mornings count, and everything I’m doing seems to be working better. I feel more effective. I have more energy. My relationships are stronger. I’m more patient. More productive. More focused. More determined. I feel stronger overall.



So here’s what I’m doing differently. I don’t do every single one of these things every morning, but I do several of them each day. Being able to pick and choose gives my routine some variety. The routine can take me an hour or more, but there have been mornings I needed to get to school early, and I’ve done an abbreviated version in 10 minutes.



1. Smile



Start the day by finding something to smile about. Choose to smile. Research has shown the physical act of smiling has benefits for stress recovery, improved mood, and creativity. (Time: 30 seconds)



2. Breathe



I’m using a meditation app to work on focused breathing and meditation. There are several smartphone apps available, and I’ve tried a couple of them. Practicing mindfulness is great for increased focus, reduced anxiety, and improved cognition. (Time: 3-5 minutes)

3. Be Grateful



Gratitude is powerful for feeling better, having more energy, and training your brain to look for good things. I follow the advice of author MK Mueller. Be grateful for three things that have happened in the last 24 hours with no repeats ever. It’s great to share your gratitude with someone or journal about it. (Time: 3-5 minutes)



4. Move



This one I’m including every day in my routine. I do something to be physically active each morning. It might be running several miles. Or, it might be a two-minute plank and that’s all. But I’m getting some type of exercise in my routine every morning. (Time: 2 minutes-1 hour)



5. Envision



Almost all great athletes use mental imagery to gain an edge. When you imagine exactly how you want a situation, interaction, event, or performance to go, it creates a mental model for success. It sets the stage for success. I spend a few moments each morning thinking about desired outcomes. I think about these things as if the outcome has already been established, as if they are already true. I think it until I feel it. (Time 2-5 minutes) 



6. Affirm



This practice is similar to envisioning except it is focused on self more than situation. So I’m thinking about characteristics I’m developing in myself as if they are already present at the desired level. I tell myself the things that I value and that I want to become. It helps clarify my values and focuses my growth. (Time 2-5 minutes)



7. Read



Like movement and exercise, I also make reading part of every morning. I keep a list of books to read and have several people in my life who share book suggestions with me. I also try to read blog posts and, of course, Twitter posts from my PLN. I can’t imagine not making reading a habit in my life. The things I continually learn add so much value to who I am and what I am striving to accomplish in life. (Time 15-45 minutes)



8. Reflect



I often think back over recent events during my morning routine. I think about decisions or interactions and what I can learn from them. What’s working? What’s not working? I’m careful not to beat myself up if something didn’t go well. I simply consider what I could do better next time and keep my focus on the future. If I can’t do something to improve myself or the situation, then I’m not going to continue thinking about it. Worry and regret is disempowering. I want to spend my time thinking in empowered ways. (Time 2-5 minutes)



9. Pray



If you’re not a person of faith, you may choose to skip right over this one. I don’t want to push my faith on anyone. I realize a person’s beliefs about God are…well, deeply personal. But I must share this part of my morning, because for me, spending time in prayer is the most valuable part of my daily routine. I have a list of things I pray about each morning. They are things that are very important to me. I must also share that my prayer life often intersects with each of the other parts of my routine. My whole morning routine is basically my focused time with God. So I’m often praying while I’m exercising or reflecting. I want to start my day by meeting with God, so I’m more effective as I meet with people throughout the day. (Time 5-10 minutes)



I realize this seems like a long list of things to do, especially if you don’t like getting up early in the morning. Keep in mind I don’t do all of these every day. And the amount of time I spend on each one varies also. 



If you want to reduce stress, have more energy, and increase your effectiveness, I highly recommend developing your morning routine. How you spend the first hour of your day will have a big impact on how the rest of your day goes. Make it count.



What are some of your morning routines? Are you intentional about daily renewal? What are your thoughts about reducing stress and increasing your effectiveness? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Importance of Daily Renewal for Educators



Teaching is a challenging and exhausting profession. No one can understand what it’s like until you’ve experienced it. You make untold numbers of decisions every day. You work with kids who have all sorts of unique and sometimes unrelenting needs. 



The pressure is real. Sometimes it feels like you’re just treading water and then someone hands you a concrete block. So you better be a great swimmer! Ha.



I hear lots of ideas about educators dealing with stress. You need to make time for yourself. You need to recharge in the summer and on weekends. You need to have a healthy work/life balance. All of those things are probably true.



But for me, the biggest thing that helps me stay positive, productive, and energized is daily renewal. And that comes in the form of my morning routine and my mental approach throughout the day. I’m renewing in the morning and then I’m renewing by disciplining my thoughts throughout the day.



For the past couple of months, I’ve really focused on my making my mornings more effective. I’ve always tried to have a routine in the morning, but last school year at times I wasn’t as diligent. And I could definitely tell a difference.



More recently, I’m making my mornings count, and everything I’m doing seems to be working better. I feel more effective. I have more energy. My relationships are stronger. I’m more patient. More productive. More focused. More determined. I feel stronger overall.



So here’s what I’m doing differently. I don’t do every single one of these things every morning, but I do several of them each day. Being able to pick and choose gives my routine some variety. The routine can take me an hour or more, but there have been mornings I needed to get to school early, and I’ve done an abbreviated version in 10 minutes.



1. Smile



Start the day by finding something to smile about. Choose to smile. Research has shown the physical act of smiling has benefits for stress recovery, improved mood, and creativity. (Time: 30 seconds)



2. Breathe



I’m using a meditation app to work on focused breathing and meditation. There are several smartphone apps available, and I’ve tried a couple of them. Practicing mindfulness is great for increased focus, reduced anxiety, and improved cognition. (Time: 3-5 minutes)

3. Be Grateful



Gratitude is powerful for feeling better, having more energy, and training your brain to look for good things. I follow the advice of author MK Mueller. Be grateful for three things that have happened in the last 24 hours with no repeats ever. It’s great to share your gratitude with someone or journal about it. (Time: 3-5 minutes)



4. Move



This one I’m including every day in my routine. I do something to be physically active each morning. It might be running several miles. Or, it might be a two-minute plank and that’s all. But I’m getting some type of exercise in my routine every morning. (Time: 2 minutes-1 hour)



5. Envision



Almost all great athletes use mental imagery to gain an edge. When you imagine exactly how you want a situation, interaction, event, or performance to go, it creates a mental model for success. It sets the stage for success. I spend a few moments each morning thinking about desired outcomes. I think about these things as if the outcome has already been established, as if they are already true. I think it until I feel it. (Time 2-5 minutes) 



6. Affirm



This practice is similar to envisioning except it is focused on self more than situation. So I’m thinking about characteristics I’m developing in myself as if they are already present at the desired level. I tell myself the things that I value and that I want to become. It helps clarify my values and focuses my growth. (Time 2-5 minutes)



7. Read



Like movement and exercise, I also make reading part of every morning. I keep a list of books to read and have several people in my life who share book suggestions with me. I also try to read blog posts and, of course, Twitter posts from my PLN. I can’t imagine not making reading a habit in my life. The things I continually learn add so much value to who I am and what I am striving to accomplish in life. (Time 15-45 minutes)



8. Reflect



I often think back over recent events during my morning routine. I think about decisions or interactions and what I can learn from them. What’s working? What’s not working? I’m careful not to beat myself up if something didn’t go well. I simply consider what I could do better next time and keep my focus on the future. If I can’t do something to improve myself or the situation, then I’m not going to continue thinking about it. Worry and regret is disempowering. I want to spend my time thinking in empowered ways. (Time 2-5 minutes)



9. Pray



If you’re not a person of faith, you may choose to skip right over this one. I don’t want to push my faith on anyone. I realize a person’s beliefs about God are…well, deeply personal. But I must share this part of my morning, because for me, spending time in prayer is the most valuable part of my daily routine. I have a list of things I pray about each morning. They are things that are very important to me. I must also share that my prayer life often intersects with each of the other parts of my routine. My whole morning routine is basically my focused time with God. So I’m often praying while I’m exercising or reflecting. I want to start my day by meeting with God, so I’m more effective as I meet with people throughout the day. (Time 5-10 minutes)



I realize this seems like a long list of things to do, especially if you don’t like getting up early in the morning. Keep in mind I don’t do all of these every day. And the amount of time I spend on each one varies also. 



If you want to reduce stress, have more energy, and increase your effectiveness, I highly recommend developing your morning routine. How you spend the first hour of your day will have a big impact on how the rest of your day goes. Make it count.



What are some of your morning routines? Are you intentional about daily renewal? What are your thoughts about reducing stress and increasing your effectiveness? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Importance of Daily Renewal for Educators



Teaching is a challenging and exhausting profession. No one can understand what it’s like until you’ve experienced it. You make untold numbers of decisions every day. You work with kids who have all sorts of unique and sometimes unrelenting needs. 



The pressure is real. Sometimes it feels like you’re just treading water and then someone hands you a concrete block. So you better be a great swimmer! Ha.



I hear lots of ideas about educators dealing with stress. You need to make time for yourself. You need to recharge in the summer and on weekends. You need to have a healthy work/life balance. All of those things are probably true.



But for me, the biggest thing that helps me stay positive, productive, and energized is daily renewal. And that comes in the form of my morning routine and my mental approach throughout the day. I’m renewing in the morning and then I’m renewing by disciplining my thoughts throughout the day.



For the past couple of months, I’ve really focused on my making my mornings more effective. I’ve always tried to have a routine in the morning, but last school year at times I wasn’t as diligent. And I could definitely tell a difference.



More recently, I’m making my mornings count, and everything I’m doing seems to be working better. I feel more effective. I have more energy. My relationships are stronger. I’m more patient. More productive. More focused. More determined. I feel stronger overall.



So here’s what I’m doing differently. I don’t do every single one of these things every morning, but I do several of them each day. Being able to pick and choose gives my routine some variety. The routine can take me an hour or more, but there have been mornings I needed to get to school early, and I’ve done an abbreviated version in 10 minutes.



1. Smile



Start the day by finding something to smile about. Choose to smile. Research has shown the physical act of smiling has benefits for stress recovery, improved mood, and creativity. (Time: 30 seconds)



2. Breathe



I’m using a meditation app to work on focused breathing and meditation. There are several smartphone apps available, and I’ve tried a couple of them. Practicing mindfulness is great for increased focus, reduced anxiety, and improved cognition. (Time: 3-5 minutes)

3. Be Grateful



Gratitude is powerful for feeling better, having more energy, and training your brain to look for good things. I follow the advice of author MK Mueller. Be grateful for three things that have happened in the last 24 hours with no repeats ever. It’s great to share your gratitude with someone or journal about it. (Time: 3-5 minutes)



4. Move



This one I’m including every day in my routine. I do something to be physically active each morning. It might be running several miles. Or, it might be a two-minute plank and that’s all. But I’m getting some type of exercise in my routine every morning. (Time: 2 minutes-1 hour)



5. Envision



Almost all great athletes use mental imagery to gain an edge. When you imagine exactly how you want a situation, interaction, event, or performance to go, it creates a mental model for success. It sets the stage for success. I spend a few moments each morning thinking about desired outcomes. I think about these things as if the outcome has already been established, as if they are already true. I think it until I feel it. (Time 2-5 minutes) 



6. Affirm



This practice is similar to envisioning except it is focused on self more than situation. So I’m thinking about characteristics I’m developing in myself as if they are already present at the desired level. I tell myself the things that I value and that I want to become. It helps clarify my values and focuses my growth. (Time 2-5 minutes)



7. Read



Like movement and exercise, I also make reading part of every morning. I keep a list of books to read and have several people in my life who share book suggestions with me. I also try to read blog posts and, of course, Twitter posts from my PLN. I can’t imagine not making reading a habit in my life. The things I continually learn add so much value to who I am and what I am striving to accomplish in life. (Time 15-45 minutes)



8. Reflect



I often think back over recent events during my morning routine. I think about decisions or interactions and what I can learn from them. What’s working? What’s not working? I’m careful not to beat myself up if something didn’t go well. I simply consider what I could do better next time and keep my focus on the future. If I can’t do something to improve myself or the situation, then I’m not going to continue thinking about it. Worry and regret is disempowering. I want to spend my time thinking in empowered ways. (Time 2-5 minutes)



9. Pray



If you’re not a person of faith, you may choose to skip right over this one. I don’t want to push my faith on anyone. I realize a person’s beliefs about God are…well, deeply personal. But I must share this part of my morning, because for me, spending time in prayer is the most valuable part of my daily routine. I have a list of things I pray about each morning. They are things that are very important to me. I must also share that my prayer life often intersects with each of the other parts of my routine. My whole morning routine is basically my focused time with God. So I’m often praying while I’m exercising or reflecting. I want to start my day by meeting with God, so I’m more effective as I meet with people throughout the day. (Time 5-10 minutes)



I realize this seems like a long list of things to do, especially if you don’t like getting up early in the morning. Keep in mind I don’t do all of these every day. And the amount of time I spend on each one varies also. 



If you want to reduce stress, have more energy, and increase your effectiveness, I highly recommend developing your morning routine. How you spend the first hour of your day will have a big impact on how the rest of your day goes. Make it count.



What are some of your morning routines? Are you intentional about daily renewal? What are your thoughts about reducing stress and increasing your effectiveness? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Importance of Daily Renewal for Educators





Most of what is learned in the traditional approach to school is not adaptable learning. It is discrete learning. It’s focused on a specific body of knowledge and isn’t always transferable to new situations. Yesterday’s learning is in silos with distinct separation among the disciplines. It’s the type of learning that was useful in a world where you could train for a profession and be assured of relative stability in that profession for many years.



Gone are those days.



Our world is moving extremely fast. We can’t even fathom how fast things are changing. We’re too close to the change to get a sense of the magnitude. 



How can we deal with this increased complexity and uncertainty? Change is accelerating. And that creates a need for a different type of learning. In Future Driven, I write that adaptable learners will own the future.



So what makes an adaptable learner? Here are 11 characteristics.



1. Recognize Your Environment Is Constantly Changing



Adaptable learners are ready. They embrace change. It’s not just small changes we’re talking about. It’s a tidal wave of change that’s coming. Change is accelerating exponentially. You must be willing to adapt.



2. Reject Comfort and Complacency



You can’t adjust to the changes, meet the challenges, or take advantage of the opportunities without stepping out of your comfort zone.



3. Take Ownership of Results



It’s not helpful to blame poor outcomes on changing circumstances. The adaptable learner looks inward first to find solutions. There’s a stubbornness to find a way or make a way.



4. Show Willingness to Collaborate



No one person can have all the skills needed to meet the challenges of rapid change. But together, it’s possible to leverage our shared abilities for the good of our team.



5. Build Resilience and Perseverance



In an uncertain learning environment, there will be mistakes. It’s important to learn from these mistakes and press on. It’s critical to stay with difficult problems and try different solutions.



6. Demonstrate Care for Others



I believe adaptable learners are caring learners. People find better solutions when there is a larger purpose. When people are caring learners, it makes the learning meaningful.



7. Be Open to Changing Your Mind



No one has it all figured out. Have strong opinions loosely held. If presented with new evidence, be willing to take a new position.



8. Be Flexible in Your Methods, Focused on Your Mission



Our methods and practices must change with the times, but our process of adapting can continue. And ultimately, the mission can continue. 



9. Be Eager to Try New Things and Learn New Skills



Adaptable learners are constantly picking up new skills and adjusting previous skills. There has to be a willingness to do something new even if it’s hard at first.



10. Be Open to Feedback



Feedback is a necessary ingredient to learning. Don’t feel threatened by feedback. Pursue feedback. And use it to adapt and learn.



11. Develop Confidence in Your Ability to Learn



Most people are frightened by the thought of rapid change. But the adaptable learner feels a sense of confidence. When you believe in your ability to learn and solve problems, you view challenges as opportunities.



How are these characteristics being developed in your classroom or school? Are your students ready? Will they thrive in an unpredictable world? Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. I want to hear from you.

Read More 11 Powerful Characteristics of Adaptable Learners