Tag: Social Media

A lot of my work is with schools and districts, and although I discuss the power of networks to bring a “world-class education” into classrooms, I have been focusing a lot more on the local benefits of networks, not only the global connections. If one teacher connects outside their school and brings great ideas to … [Read more…]

Read More Your Local Expertise

A lot of my work is with schools and districts, and although I discuss the power of networks to bring a “world-class education” into classrooms, I have been focusing a lot more on the local benefits of networks, not only the global connections. If one teacher connects outside their school and brings great ideas to … [Read more…]

Read More Your Local Expertise



A few months ago, I took a group of teachers to visit the Ron Clark Academy (RCA) in Atlanta. It was an amazing experience to see the school up close and learn along with educators from all across the country.



During the opening, Ron Clark shared that visiting the school is kind of like going to the grocery store. When you go, you don’t take home everything that is on the shelves. You pick out the things you need, the things you like, or the things you want. But you have lots of options.



Everyone is not going to fill their shopping cart with the same items at the grocery store. Likewise, not everything that happens at RCA will work for every teacher, every classroom, or every school.



However, there are some amazing selections for you to consider. And if you are passionate, creative, and inspired, you will see all sorts of ways you can bring pieces of RCA to your work. 



And if you’ve lost a little of your passion, creativity, or inspiration, you might just rekindle that too!



I think the same can be said for building a Personal Learning Network (PLN) and connecting on Twitter. Not every idea you encounter on Twitter will go in your shopping cart. 



Some things might not work for you right now. You’ll pass over those. 



Some things might seem too big to fit in your cart right now. You can consider those again in the future.



You might only go shopping once a week at first. Later, you may want to stop in daily to see what’s new.



That’s what’s great about it. It’s completely up to you. And customized for you. With a little skill, you can get out of it what you need, whenever you need it.

Twitter is actually more like Amazon than your neighborhood grocery. Part of Amazon’s mission is to be a place where “people can find and discover anything they might want to buy online.” 



Twitter is like that for educators. You can connect with people who are like-minded and get ideas and support for just about anything you want to accomplish as an educator.



And you can do it just about any time and any place that works for you.



It’s a total game-changer. 



Jeff Nelson adapted the following list from my satirical post about Twitter PD. I admit I had fun with the satire, but he put a positive spin on it. There are just so many reasons for educators to use this tool. It’s such a great way to grow and learn.






Who else thinks Twitter is a game-changer? How has it impacted your work as an educator? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Twitter Is Like Going to the Grocery Store



A few months ago, I took a group of teachers to visit the Ron Clark Academy (RCA) in Atlanta. It was an amazing experience to see the school up close and learn along with educators from all across the country.



During the opening, Ron Clark shared that visiting the school is kind of like going to the grocery store. When you go, you don’t take home everything that is on the shelves. You pick out the things you need, the things you like, or the things you want. But you have lots of options.



Everyone is not going to fill their shopping cart with the same items at the grocery store. Likewise, not everything that happens at RCA will work for every teacher, every classroom, or every school.



However, there are some amazing selections for you to consider. And if you are passionate, creative, and inspired, you will see all sorts of ways you can bring pieces of RCA to your work. 



And if you’ve lost a little of your passion, creativity, or inspiration, you might just rekindle that too!



I think the same can be said for building a Personal Learning Network (PLN) and connecting on Twitter. Not every idea you encounter on Twitter will go in your shopping cart. 



Some things might not work for you right now. You’ll pass over those. 



Some things might seem too big to fit in your cart right now. You can consider those again in the future.



You might only go shopping once a week at first. Later, you may want to stop in daily to see what’s new.



That’s what’s great about it. It’s completely up to you. And customized for you. With a little skill, you can get out of it what you need, whenever you need it.

Twitter is actually more like Amazon than your neighborhood grocery. Part of Amazon’s mission is to be a place where “people can find and discover anything they might want to buy online.” 



Twitter is like that for educators. You can connect with people who are like-minded and get ideas and support for just about anything you want to accomplish as an educator.



And you can do it just about any time and any place that works for you.



It’s a total game-changer. 



Jeff Nelson adapted the following list from my satirical post about Twitter PD. I admit I had fun with the satire, but he put a positive spin on it. There are just so many reasons for educators to use this tool. It’s such a great way to grow and learn.






Who else thinks Twitter is a game-changer? How has it impacted your work as an educator? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Twitter Is Like Going to the Grocery Store



A few months ago, I took a group of teachers to visit the Ron Clark Academy (RCA) in Atlanta. It was an amazing experience to see the school up close and learn along with educators from all across the country.



During the opening, Ron Clark shared that visiting the school is kind of like going to the grocery store. When you go, you don’t take home everything that is on the shelves. You pick out the things you need, the things you like, or the things you want. But you have lots of options.



Everyone is not going to fill their shopping cart with the same items at the grocery store. Likewise, not everything that happens at RCA will work for every teacher, every classroom, or every school.



However, there are some amazing selections for you to consider. And if you are passionate, creative, and inspired, you will see all sorts of ways you can bring pieces of RCA to your work. 



And if you’ve lost a little of your passion, creativity, or inspiration, you might just rekindle that too!



I think the same can be said for building a Personal Learning Network (PLN) and connecting on Twitter. Not every idea you encounter on Twitter will go in your shopping cart. 



Some things might not work for you right now. You’ll pass over those. 



Some things might seem too big to fit in your cart right now. You can consider those again in the future.



You might only go shopping once a week at first. Later, you may want to stop in daily to see what’s new.



That’s what’s great about it. It’s completely up to you. And customized for you. With a little skill, you can get out of it what you need, whenever you need it.

Twitter is actually more like Amazon than your neighborhood grocery. Part of Amazon’s mission is to be a place where “people can find and discover anything they might want to buy online.” 



Twitter is like that for educators. You can connect with people who are like-minded and get ideas and support for just about anything you want to accomplish as an educator.



And you can do it just about any time and any place that works for you.



It’s a total game-changer. 



Jeff Nelson adapted the following list from my satirical post about Twitter PD. I admit I had fun with the satire, but he put a positive spin on it. There are just so many reasons for educators to use this tool. It’s such a great way to grow and learn.






Who else thinks Twitter is a game-changer? How has it impacted your work as an educator? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Twitter Is Like Going to the Grocery Store

Having a beast that just turned 16 means I get to engage in all of the driver centered conversations. It’s “When can I, where can I, how can I” for #allthethings. I’m watching friend after friend post pictures of permits, of licenses, of cars. (Parent pressure, yeesh.) It’s not a decision that we’re rushing into […]

The post Educating vs scaring…which social media route do you take? appeared first on Technically Yours Teamann.

Read More Educating vs scaring…which social media route do you take?

Twitter EDU :: Your (FREE) One-Stop-All-You-Need-To-Know-Guide to Twitter I have been working on this book for over a year and a half, and it’s finally done! Get your free copy here. Here is a brief description of the book: Your One-Stop-All-You-Need-To-Know-Guide to Twitter. “The hardest part of Twitter is that it does not have a friendly […]

Read More Twitter EDU – The Twitter Guide

Recently, I have started my own “podcasting” experience by sharing my #thoughtsfromthecar.  I drive quite a bit to events, so I just turn on the voice memos app on my phone, and start talking.  Although there are lots of bumbling through ideas, it is meant to be just informal. On my most recent episode, I … [Read more…]

Read More 3 Ideas to Help Others Embrace Your Ideas



The use of technology in schools continues to rise each year. By 2019, spending for education technology is expected to be more than $55 billion. More and more schools are utilizing devices as part of routine, daily learning. 



And this shift is happening for good reason. The world is becoming increasingly digital, and students will need skills that involve using technology to create, connect, and learn. A recent article claimed that just having the word ‘digital’ listed on your resume improved your chances of landing the job.



As technology becomes even more pervasive in schools, the need for effective digital leadership will increase as well. Even now, I believe it’s impossible to be an effective leader unless you are also an effective digital leader. All educators need skills for using digital tools to support and transform learning.



But there are also a number of myths about digital leadership I want to dispel. There are often misunderstandings about what it means to be a digital leader.

1. Digital leaders are tech geeks.



You don’t have to be a technology geek to be an effective digital leader. It’s great if you have strong digital skills or love technology, but it’s more important to be an expert about learning. The most important thing is the willingness to learn more about technology. It’s great if you’re a tech geek, but it’s essential to be a learning geek. And, it’s critical to recognize the importance of technology to help you and your students leverage skills. 



Every digital leader should strive to learn more about using tech and strive to make that learning visible. I’m often considered a tech-forward principal, but I learn something new every day. It’s not as important to have all the technical knowledge as it is to model the mindset of a constant learner.



2. Digital leaders are always administrators.



It’s very important for administrators to be digital leaders, but they aren’t the only ones in the school who can do the job. We need leadership from every corner of the school. It takes collective leadership to really support the culture of digital learning that is needed in schools. Change is hard, and there are often leaders in the school besides the administrator who can help champion the cause of using technology for learning.



3. Digital leaders force everyone in their schools to use technology.



Effective digital leaders don’t look for technology to be used at every turn. They don’t force technology on people. Instead, they constantly model, teach, and inspire. They start with why it’s important to for students to use technology, and then they challenge people to grow. They don’t want technology being used just for the sake of technology. They want to see digital tools being used when it makes sense to use them and when it supports learning. They encourage teachers to use digital tools in ways that transform learning.



Every educator is at a different place with their skills and their mindset about technology. Digital leaders honor teachers as learners and support them wherever they are in their learning journey. Even when growth is slow, if the educator is growing, that is success.



4. Digital leaders love everything about technology.



Not true. Digital leaders can fully see the importance and relevance of technology and still not love everything about technology. Sometimes technology is a pain. It hovers somewhere between being a blessing and a burden. And there are some parts of technology we don’t have to embrace. No one likes it when technology doesn’t work. Devices can be a huge distraction. There are all sorts of dangers online. People get addicted to the internet. And the list goes on. Some of these challenges work directly against learning.



But clearly there are incredible benefits to technology too. Digital leaders work tirelessly to overcome the pitfalls of technology use to help make sure teachers and students have what they need to leverage these tools for productive use. There isn’t a single challenge I’ve seen that can’t be overcome with inspired leadership and careful planning.



5. Digital leaders spend the whole day tweeting.



Completely false. There’s no question that digital leaders tend to be connected leaders and one of the best ways to connect is through Twitter. In fact, Twitter has been one of the best tools for professional learning I’ve ever encountered, and it has been an invaluable resource in my own digital leadership, and in my leadership overall.



But effective digital leaders are busy each day supporting learning in their schools in hundreds of face to face interactions. Not everything that happens in a school is digital, nor should it be. Our goal in our school as we transitioned to a device for every learner was to improve the quality of our conversations at the same time. We want better learning with digital tools, while at the same time increasing the quantity and quality of discussions happening in classrooms.



Question: What other myths or misunderstandings do you see about digital leadership? What are the biggest challenges digital leaders face? I want to hear your feedback. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 5 Myths of Digital Leadership



The use of technology in schools continues to rise each year. By 2019, spending for education technology is expected to be more than $55 billion. More and more schools are utilizing devices as part of routine, daily learning. 



And this shift is happening for good reason. The world is becoming increasingly digital, and students will need skills that involve using technology to create, connect, and learn. A recent article claimed that just having the word ‘digital’ listed on your resume improved your chances of landing the job.



As technology becomes even more pervasive in schools, the need for effective digital leadership will increase as well. Even now, I believe it’s impossible to be an effective leader unless you are also an effective digital leader. All educators need skills for using digital tools to support and transform learning.



But there are also a number of myths about digital leadership I want to dispel. There are often misunderstandings about what it means to be a digital leader.

1. Digital leaders are tech geeks.



You don’t have to be a technology geek to be an effective digital leader. It’s great if you have strong digital skills or love technology, but it’s more important to be an expert about learning. The most important thing is the willingness to learn more about technology. It’s great if you’re a tech geek, but it’s essential to be a learning geek. And, it’s critical to recognize the importance of technology to help you and your students leverage skills. 



Every digital leader should strive to learn more about using tech and strive to make that learning visible. I’m often considered a tech-forward principal, but I learn something new every day. It’s not as important to have all the technical knowledge as it is to model the mindset of a constant learner.



2. Digital leaders are always administrators.



It’s very important for administrators to be digital leaders, but they aren’t the only ones in the school who can do the job. We need leadership from every corner of the school. It takes collective leadership to really support the culture of digital learning that is needed in schools. Change is hard, and there are often leaders in the school besides the administrator who can help champion the cause of using technology for learning.



3. Digital leaders force everyone in their schools to use technology.



Effective digital leaders don’t look for technology to be used at every turn. They don’t force technology on people. Instead, they constantly model, teach, and inspire. They start with why it’s important to for students to use technology, and then they challenge people to grow. They don’t want technology being used just for the sake of technology. They want to see digital tools being used when it makes sense to use them and when it supports learning. They encourage teachers to use digital tools in ways that transform learning.



Every educator is at a different place with their skills and their mindset about technology. Digital leaders honor teachers as learners and support them wherever they are in their learning journey. Even when growth is slow, if the educator is growing, that is success.



4. Digital leaders love everything about technology.



Not true. Digital leaders can fully see the importance and relevance of technology and still not love everything about technology. Sometimes technology is a pain. It hovers somewhere between being a blessing and a burden. And there are some parts of technology we don’t have to embrace. No one likes it when technology doesn’t work. Devices can be a huge distraction. There are all sorts of dangers online. People get addicted to the internet. And the list goes on. Some of these challenges work directly against learning.



But clearly there are incredible benefits to technology too. Digital leaders work tirelessly to overcome the pitfalls of technology use to help make sure teachers and students have what they need to leverage these tools for productive use. There isn’t a single challenge I’ve seen that can’t be overcome with inspired leadership and careful planning.



5. Digital leaders spend the whole day tweeting.



Completely false. There’s no question that digital leaders tend to be connected leaders and one of the best ways to connect is through Twitter. In fact, Twitter has been one of the best tools for professional learning I’ve ever encountered, and it has been an invaluable resource in my own digital leadership, and in my leadership overall.



But effective digital leaders are busy each day supporting learning in their schools in hundreds of face to face interactions. Not everything that happens in a school is digital, nor should it be. Our goal in our school as we transitioned to a device for every learner was to improve the quality of our conversations at the same time. We want better learning with digital tools, while at the same time increasing the quantity and quality of discussions happening in classrooms.



Question: What other myths or misunderstandings do you see about digital leadership? What are the biggest challenges digital leaders face? I want to hear your feedback. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 5 Myths of Digital Leadership

The post is inspired by a L2talk I did at the Learning2 Europe conference in Warsaw. “every storyteller has a bias – and so does every platform”- Andrew Postman “My…

Read More Puppets on a string.

The #IMMOOC experience (Innovator’s Mindset Massive Open Online Course) has three main purposes: To dig deeper into the book, “The Innovator’s Mindset“ To create and connect your own learning To build your own networks. As I have been watching people share their own learning through blogging, videos, and other images, it has been fascinating to … [Read more…]

Read More 3 Ways to Build Your Network #IMMOOC

The #IMMOOC experience (Innovator’s Mindset Massive Open Online Course) has three main purposes: To dig deeper into the book, “The Innovator’s Mindset“ To create and connect your own learning To build your own networks. As I have been watching people share their own learning through blogging, videos, and other images, it has been fascinating to … [Read more…]

Read More 3 Ways to Build Your Network #IMMOOC

The #IMMOOC experience (Innovator’s Mindset Massive Open Online Course) has three main purposes: To dig deeper into the book, “The Innovator’s Mindset“ To create and connect your own learning To build your own networks. As I have been watching people share their own learning through blogging, videos, and other images, it has been fascinating to … [Read more…]

Read More 3 Ways to Build Your Network #IMMOOC





I use my iPhone to do most of my connecting through social media. I guess that trend is common since mobile device use is up while use of laptops/desktops is down worldwide. This chart illustrates how that trend is expected to continue.




Retrieved: http://digiday.com/media/mobile-overtaking-desktops-around-world-5-charts/





Social media has been transformational in my work as an educator. The connections I’ve made and the ideas I’ve encountered have pushed me to grow and learn in ways I never could’ve imagined.



But I also don’t want social media to take over my life. I work very hard to maximize my productivity and get the most out of my online work without compromising other important areas of my life.



These are 11 apps I’ve used that I’ve found most beneficial to managing my social media life. They aren’t in any particular order, and they serve a variety of purposes.



1. Twitter-I use the Twitter app to read tweets and post to multiple accounts (school and personal/professional). I sometimes even participate in Twitter chats using my iPhone. 



2. Buffer-This app is fantastic for scheduling tweets and managing multiple social media accounts. I like to read and share relevant content to my followers. I’ve found Buffer is the best way to do this. One of the things I like about it is the ability to follow RSS feeds within the app. It brings some of my favorite content right into the app so I can review and share.



3. Facebook Pages-I help manage content for our high school page, and I also have a Facebook fan page for my blog. I can take care of both accounts through this app’s interface. It works great!



4. Nuzzel-I use Nuzzel to read the hottest stories from my Twitter feed. Basically, it ranks articles that have been shared the most by my friends. I always find content here I want to share with others. It also works with Facebook. You just have to connect your accounts to the app.



5. Evernote-Anything I don’t want to forget goes in Evernote. It’s a great app for taking notes and staying organized. I keep a list of possible blog topics here also so I always have something to think and write about.



6. Juice-This app is another way I get content to read and share. It analyzes my Twitter and then generates new articles to read every 24 hours. I don’t think very many people know about this one, but I really like it.



7. Flipboard-I use Flipboard semi-regularly, but it often frustrates me. It’s supposed to aggregate relevant links and stories based on my interests. It’s algorithm is supposed to learn my preferences and habits. The problem is I don’t find helpful content there as often as I’d like. Am I doing something wrong? 



8. Vanillapen-This app is great for making quick and easy quote images. I like to share inspiring images or quotes and this makes it a breeze.



9. Pexels-You might share this app with your students too. It’s a great online platform for finding Creative Commons licensed photos to use in projects and presentations. You don’t want to violate copyright laws by choosing any photo from a Google search. The photos on this site are free and there are new pics added daily. 



10. Canva-I use Canva to create images for blog posts or to share on social media. Some of the graphics and images are fee based, but I use it often and rarely pay for anything.



11. TweetDeck-This tool is my favorite way to participate in Twitter chats. The simple column view allows users to monitor multiple accounts or hashtags all at once. For a chat, I typically have a column for the hashtag and one for my notifications so I know when someone has mentioned or tweeted at me.



I always enjoying new apps and have really benefited from the ones I’ve shared in this post. Having the right app is like finding the right tool in my shop. It makes every project turn out better!



Question: What are your favorite apps right now? I’m curious what works well for you. You can leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 11 Apps That Help Me Manage My Social Media Life





I use my iPhone to do most of my connecting through social media. I guess that trend is common since mobile device use is up while use of laptops/desktops is down worldwide. This chart illustrates how that trend is expected to continue.




Retrieved: http://digiday.com/media/mobile-overtaking-desktops-around-world-5-charts/





Social media has been transformational in my work as an educator. The connections I’ve made and the ideas I’ve encountered have pushed me to grow and learn in ways I never could’ve imagined.



But I also don’t want social media to take over my life. I work very hard to maximize my productivity and get the most out of my online work without compromising other important areas of my life.



These are 11 apps I’ve used that I’ve found most beneficial to managing my social media life. They aren’t in any particular order, and they serve a variety of purposes.



1. Twitter-I use the Twitter app to read tweets and post to multiple accounts (school and personal/professional). I sometimes even participate in Twitter chats using my iPhone. 



2. Buffer-This app is fantastic for scheduling tweets and managing multiple social media accounts. I like to read and share relevant content to my followers. I’ve found Buffer is the best way to do this. One of the things I like about it is the ability to follow RSS feeds within the app. It brings some of my favorite content right into the app so I can review and share.



3. Facebook Pages-I help manage content for our high school page, and I also have a Facebook fan page for my blog. I can take care of both accounts through this app’s interface. It works great!



4. Nuzzel-I use Nuzzel to read the hottest stories from my Twitter feed. Basically, it ranks articles that have been shared the most by my friends. I always find content here I want to share with others. It also works with Facebook. You just have to connect your accounts to the app.



5. Evernote-Anything I don’t want to forget goes in Evernote. It’s a great app for taking notes and staying organized. I keep a list of possible blog topics here also so I always have something to think and write about.



6. Juice-This app is another way I get content to read and share. It analyzes my Twitter and then generates new articles to read every 24 hours. I don’t think very many people know about this one, but I really like it.



7. Flipboard-I use Flipboard semi-regularly, but it often frustrates me. It’s supposed to aggregate relevant links and stories based on my interests. It’s algorithm is supposed to learn my preferences and habits. The problem is I don’t find helpful content there as often as I’d like. Am I doing something wrong? 



8. Vanillapen-This app is great for making quick and easy quote images. I like to share inspiring images or quotes and this makes it a breeze.



9. Pexels-You might share this app with your students too. It’s a great online platform for finding Creative Commons licensed photos to use in projects and presentations. You don’t want to violate copyright laws by choosing any photo from a Google search. The photos on this site are free and there are new pics added daily. 



10. Canva-I use Canva to create images for blog posts or to share on social media. Some of the graphics and images are fee based, but I use it often and rarely pay for anything.



11. TweetDeck-This tool is my favorite way to participate in Twitter chats. The simple column view allows users to monitor multiple accounts or hashtags all at once. For a chat, I typically have a column for the hashtag and one for my notifications so I know when someone has mentioned or tweeted at me.



I always enjoying new apps and have really benefited from the ones I’ve shared in this post. Having the right app is like finding the right tool in my shop. It makes every project turn out better!



Question: What are your favorite apps right now? I’m curious what works well for you. You can leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 11 Apps That Help Me Manage My Social Media Life