Tag: Priorities

I love the energy and intention of the word relentless. There is power in that word. It indicates persistence, perseverance, commitment, and fortitude. The word is strong and mighty.

When we talk about educators being relentless, that’s often a …

Read More Relentless About the Right Things

In my previous post, I wrote how failure is not the enemy of improvement. Failure is actually a healthy part of learning and growth. The enemy of excellence is apathy or mediocrity. It’s being content, either intentionally or unintentionally, with ho…

Read More 7 Things People Think or Say that Reinforce Mediocrity



I was taught as a kid that the things that you put into your mind would have an influence on who you are and who you are becoming. Garbage in, garbage out. How you fill your cup will determine what spills over in your life. 



Actually, at the time, I remember thinking some of this was just to keep me from listening to the “wrong” type of music in my teen years. 



I think my understanding of the concept was over simplified and more focused on what I should not do. But it has just as much to do with what we should do.

The Bible puts it this way…

Above all else, guard your heart,

for everything you do flows from it.

Keep your mouth free of perversity;

keep corrupt talk far from your lips.

Let your eyes look straight ahead;

fix your gaze directly before you.

Give careful thought to the paths for your feet

and be steadfast in all your ways.

Do not turn to the right or the left;

keep your foot from evil.

Proverbs 4:23-27

Now I understand more clearly the truth of this. We really do become what we think about about. The things that we focus on become more visible to us, more evident, in every area of life. It becomes our lens. And that influences our behavior.



When our family bought a Chevy Malibu a few years ago, all of the sudden I noticed how many Chevy Malibus were on the road. I had never noticed before, but these cars were everywhere. 



When a student or parent says to me, “There’s so much drama in high school” I find it interesting because I know others who haven’t experienced all of that drama. They see social conflict everywhere because it’s the paradigm they engage with. Others mostly avoid the drama, because they focus their attention on other things.



Tony Robbins has described it this way, “Where your focus goes, energy flows.” You move in the direction of the things you focus on. Your energy goes toward those things.



When you practice gratitude, it’s amazing how you will notice more things to be grateful for. I believe you actually start to have more things to be grateful for. Good things come to people who believe the best and expect the best.



Les Brown said it simply, “What you think about, you bring about.”



Below are 8 things that will influence your growth and who you are becoming. We often think this is the type of advice our students need, and for sure they need to hear this message. But I think we all need to reflect on these things. Everyone needs this message.



How are we spending our time? What are we putting into our minds, rehearsing in our minds, and how can we ensure that it is leading us where we want to go? The patterns of our mind are powerful. They can empower us or defeat us.



The things we think about influence our effectiveness in every area of life. If you want to be a more effective educator, friend, spouse, or neighbor, think about how you are being intentional with these things.



8 Things That Influence Who You’re Becoming

1. What you watch

2. What you listen to

3. What you read

4. What you believe

5. How you spend your time

6. Who you spend your time with

7. The things you say to yourself

8. The thoughts you choose to accept



What would you add to this list? What stands out to you on this list? Leave a comment below or respond on Twitter or Facebook. I’d love to hear what you think.

Read More 8 Things That Influence Who You’re Becoming



“How did you become a Chicago Cubs fan?”



I asked the question to a Cubs fan I was visiting with recently. And I wasn’t being sarcastic, since I’m a St. Louis Cardinals fan, and that would be on point for fan behavior between the two teams.



No, I was just curious because he wasn’t from a part of the country that isn’t typically considered Cubs fan territory. He explained that some members of his family were Cubs fans but what really hooked him on the Cubs was when he attended a game at Wrigley Field (Chicago) as a young boy.



That experience, he said, was something he never forgot and resulted in his lifelong love of the Cubs. It was as simple as that.



Experiences are powerful. They can change our entire perspective for good or bad. In this case, a positive experience resulted in a deep attachment to a baseball team.



I’m wondering about how students experience school. Are we creating experiences that result in a lifelong attachment to learning? Are we creating powerful learning experiences that develop curiosity and cultivate interests?



While much of my own school experience was somewhat routine and mostly forgettable, there were some amazing experiences that really led me to want to learn more.



Most of those memorable experiences were projects or trips to visit interesting places. I remember visiting a cave, a Civil War battlefield, and even a museum with a real mummy, all part of opportunities through school.



I also remember creating a news broadcast and interviewing people from our community, as part of a project for class. I also remember competing in a stock market game, and I remember performing a classroom play.



I don’t remember a single lecture from school. I take that back. I remember one very gifted social studies teacher who could tell stories from the Civil War that were so interesting I wanted to learn more on my own. He had us on the edge of our seats.



I don’t remember any worksheet tasks standing out. I don’t remember any tests in particular. 



Here’s the thing. I’m not saying tests, or assignments, or routine work are all bad in school. I’m not saying they don’t have value. But if we want our students to be inspired learners, we better look for ways to connect learning to positive emotions. We better give students experiences that really capture their attention in ways that go far beyond the routine.



In a time where standards mastery seems to be at the top of all priorities, I wonder what types of experiences kids are having? 



What type of experience are they having when remediation has been routine for them year after year in school?



What type of experience are they having when they don’t have the opportunity to pursue things they’re interested in?



What type of experience are they having when they don’t get to learn outside the classroom by taking field trips?



A couple of high school principals were discussing how they are making sure any field trips in their school tie directly to meeting standards. I guess that’s one way to look at it.



But for me, I want our students to have as many opportunities as possible to learn and interact with interesting people and places away from our school campus. I especially want that for our under-resourced students who might not ever have those opportunities otherwise.



There is a time for rolling up our sleeves and doing the routine work of learning and life. But if we’re not also creating peak moments along the way, we are missing the joy in the journey. 



And we’re probably missing out on potential passions, and maybe even missing out on developing a passion for learning.



The routine work should flow from a deep sense of purpose. We need to know our why. That’s where lasting learning is nurtured.



As I wrote in my book, Future Driven,

Don’t just create lessons for your students. Create experiences. Students will forget a lesson, but an experience will have lasting value. We want to do more than cover content. We want to inspire learning.

Is your school making time for powerful learning experiences? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.





Read More Don’t Just Plan Lessons, Create Experiences



Earlier this week, I was speaking at What Great Educators Do Differently in Houston. It was a fantastic event with a great lineup of inspiring education leaders.



My topic was Great Educators are Risk-Takers and Difference-Makers! When I have the opportunity to work with school districts or speak at conferences, I want to remind educators that we’re educating kids for the world they’ll live in and not the world we grew up in.



It’s an central message in my book, Future Driven



The world is changing faster than ever and schools need to be changing too. I always ask, “Is your school a time capsule (static) or a time machine (dynamic)?” We can’t afford to teach to a test or simply prepare kids for the next grade level, or even college or career. We’re preparing them for life and anything they might face.



We can’t continue to prize student achievement while ignoring the critical importance of student agency. Kids need more opportunities to make decisions and take initiative. We need to develop future leaders and passionate learners, not just proficient test takers.



And the only way that will happen is by allowing teachers to have the needed professional autonomy to be risk-takers and difference-makers. Educators must have the freedom to take initiative and make decisions. They need the flexibility to use their strengths and bring their passions into their classrooms.



But I also want to challenge educators. What are you doing with the autonomy you have? Are you pushing limits? Are you challenging the status quo? Are you creating extraordinary learning opportunities that prepare students for a complex, unpredictable world? If we’re going to crush student apathy, we have to start with addressing teacher apathy. We have to show up strong!



Here are 5 Future Driven questions to think about with your team…



1. What will students need to thrive in a complex, unpredictable world? (addressing rapid change)



2. How can our school better meet the unique needs of today’s kids? (kids are dealing with new issues/pressures)



3. How can we create a place where kids who resist school are empowered to love learning? (compliance vs. empowered learning)



4. Do teachers have the autonomy they need to create deeper learning? (teacher agency)



5. Do students have opportunities to pursue and explore their own questions? (inquiry)



6. Are students expected to create and innovate in your classroom? (critical thinking, problem-solving)



7. How are students helping others through what they’re learning? (empathy, service)



What other future driven questions do you think are relevant for educators to discuss? It’s amazing how questions can help us make the best decisions. I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter

Read More 7 Future Driven Questions to Discuss With Your Team



The answer to the question seems obvious, don’t you think? Of course, educators should be lifelong learners. 



But I recently heard an education leader give a presentation where he made a claim that expecting educators to be lifelong learners, at least in the sense of attending PD or reading on their own time, was unrealistic. 



Basically, he suggested that nobody has time for that. There are too many demands on teachers as it is. I found it interesting that in spite of his claim, he also shared he is currently writing a book for educators.



He suggested the best way for professional educators to learn was through experience and by reflecting on experience with others. And I agree, that is one way to learn.



He added that when he interviewed for open positions and candidates shared about being lifelong learners, that he didn’t believe it for a minute. The universities are simply coaching their pre-service teachers on keywords they need to use in interviews.



My thinking is quite different on this issue. A big problem I see in schools is that too few are making time for their own professional reading and growth. Most people become satisfied with a certain level of effectiveness in their life, work, relationships, etc. and then hit cruise control. They don’t continue to push the limits of their own possibilities.



But that’s not the way strive for your potential, and it’s not the way to become the most effective, fulfilled educator you can be.



So here are some of my thoughts about continuous learning for educators…



1. The quickest way to improve a school is for the people inside the school to work on improving themselves. When you individually learn more as an educator, your students win, and your whole school wins too. You make your school stronger by your growth.



2. People who don’t make time for reading and growing will never break through their current capacity. They may get a little better, but they won’t experience new levels of capacity. They won’t have breakthroughs



Why? Because they are limited to their own perspective. As John Maxwell said, “Some of my best thinking is done by others.” I learn so much from what some of the leading thinkers are writing and sharing.



3. I suggest the 5-hour-rule as a great way to learn and grow. Spend at least 5 hours per week reading to build your capacity. Many of the world’s busiest and most successful people are consistent readers. 



4. The most common excuse for not reading is not having enough time. But we make time for what’s important. We all have the same number of hours in the day. And I’m wondering if most of the same people complaining about not having enough time are finding plenty of time for Netflix, YouTube, and Facebook?



5. Seth Godin suggests the more professional your field, the more important it is to stay current. If we seek to raise the standing of education as a top profession, we need to strive to learn like other top professions.



6. You wouldn’t want a surgeon operating on you who hasn’t read the latest journals about the procedures he’s performing. You want the best techniques. And your students deserve the best techniques too.



7. One of the best ways to carve our time for reading is to make it part of your morning routine. When you start the day focused on your own growth, you’ll be better able to help your students with their growth.



Are you making time for your reading and growth? How do you find the time? Do you believe educators should be lifelong learners? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Should All Educators Be Lifelong Learners?

Have you ever felt overwhelmed in trying to balance priorities? If you’re like me, you can probably think of more than once where student discipline, parent concerns, and teacher feedback provided you more tasks than you could complete in a day. No matter whether you are a new principal or a veteran leader, here’s a […]

Read More PMP:146 Good Habits for Balancing Priorities



Shouldn’t teaching be a creative profession? In my mind, most every profession should have opportunities for creativity. I think humans are made to be creative. And if we don’t have the chance to use those abilities, we are mostly going through the motions. We’re merely “doing” or “implementing” without much opportunity to use our unique gifts or strengths.



I’m referring to creativity here in the broadest sense. It’s not just artistic creativity, although that’s an important kind for sure. I’m talking about the ability to have ideas, initiate plans, and solve complex problems. Much creativity is needed for these types of activities.



So are you competent and creative? Having both. That’s probably the best scenario. Being competent is knowing your stuff. It’s being well-trained. It’s having knowledge and expertise and maybe experience too.



But being creative is the ability to use what’s available in novel and interesting ways. It’s the ability to meet the demands of your current situation and add tremendous value because of your unique gifts and abilities. Being an expert is great, but it has its limitations. How are you leveraging your expertise to create the greatest impact? That’s where creativity comes in.



I think we’ve valued competence to the extent in education that it’s placed limits on what we’re able to accomplish. When we simply double-down on past practices and past outcomes, we’re not thinking in interesting ways. We push for more of the same and pile on greater accountability and less freedom for good measure. 



The world is changing and the skills needed to be successful are changing too. When we fail to adapt our practices to current and future contexts students will face, we are failing to help them adapt. We must adapt if we want students to also have the ability to adapt and meet challenges. We need creative schools. We need adaptable schools.



Recently, LinkedIn published a list of the top in-demand soft and hard skills of 2019. Creativity was at the top of the list for soft skills. That’s right, creativity was number one. It’s clear the global economy continues to shift from an industrial world to a world of innovation. Ideas are increasingly important. Creativity is increasingly important.



So back to the original question, are you competent and creative? Does your school encourage you to be both? Or, does it limit your ability to be creative? Do you feel boxed in? 



Every organization has some limits. But limits don’t have to result in the end of creativity. It’s sad when schools create structures and expectations that crush creativity. But it’s equally sad when educators fail to use their creativity as best they can in the current situation, whatever it is. 



Even if you feel limited in your ability to use your creativity, use it to the fullest extent you can. You can still be creative. You may wish you had more freedom and flexibility in your work, but you can still create within your current situation.



Seek out others who are interested in finding ways to be creative too. You’ll be a happier, more successful, and stronger overall as an educator if you’re using your creative abilities as best you can.



How are you taking your creativity to new levels? When you’re creative in your work, do you see better results and enjoy greater fulfillment? Leave a comment below. Or, share on Twitter or Facebook. I look forward to hearing from you.

Read More Are You Competent and Creative?



Your lessons matter. Your strategies matter. Your relationships matter. Lots of other things matter too. Some of these things are in your control and some of them are not.



But in every decision you make, in every action you take, there is a common thread. What is your mental approach? Do you have a growth mindset? Are you an empowered educator? Do you believe in your ability to make a difference? Do you have a strong sense of self-efficacy? 



A person’s mental approach to any situation has an incredible impact on outcomes. The choices we make determine our future. It is our choices more than any other factor that determine who we are and who we will become. I believe that’s true for students, and I believe that’s true for us as educators as well. 



1. Extraordinary results require you to expect big results.



Extraordinary results don’t happen by accident. Just look at what successful people do, and you’ll see what it takes. First, you have to believe great things can happen. Some people are hesitant to set the bar very high, because they might fall short. Others think about how much work it’s going to take to get there, and wonder if it’s going to be worth it? 



But if you’re not willing to aim for extraordinary results, are you settling for less than what you’re capable of doing? And if you’re settling for less, are you giving your students an experience that is less than they deserve? You deserve to be your best too. Crave that which is not easily within your grasp. Dream big.



2. It’s not lack of time, it’s lack of direction.



We all have exactly the same number of hours in each day. We have the same number of days in each week. I’ve rarely heard anyone complain about lack of time who also wasn’t wasting some amount of time every day and every week. The key is how we are using the time we have. Are you making the most of your time? Are you giving time to the things that will make the biggest impact? Do you know with clarity what’s most important in your day? 



Choose to pour your energy into the things that will transform your effectiveness. You have to take risks. You’ll miss 100% of the shots you don’t take. What actions are your multipliers? They make everything better. They pay dividends into the future. Pour your energy into things that give the most returns. Find your true north and set your direction accordingly.



3. Be willing to let of go of something good for something great.



Most people reach a certain level of effectiveness, and then they just maintain the status quo. They get into a routine without continuing to stretch and push forward. Too often we are polishing the past, trying to improve on practices that are simply outdated or no longer effective. We’re aiming to make things just a little better instead of opening our minds to new possibilities. 



Don’t settle for good enough. Don’t settle for teaching as you were taught. Our world is changing faster than ever before. So our schools should reflect those changes. We can’t allow schools to become time capsules, when they could be time machines. We need to adapt and create learning that’s relevant to the world our students will live in. 



4. See problems as they are, but not worse than they are.



I believe in the power of positive thinking. But positive thinking, in my mind, is not believing everything is okay. It’s not pretending everything is great. But it is believing things can get better. It’s focusing on solutions, not problems. We need to see problems for what they are, but not act like they are impossible to overcome. 



Some people focus their energy on blaming and complaining. They throw their hands up and quit. Their solution is for everything outside of them to change. But a different approach is to be focused on pursuing excellence. No obstacle is too big to stop trying. They believe that with hard work, determination, and the desire to continually learn and grow, there is no limit to what might be possible. 



5. One of the best ways to increase student effort and engagement is to increase your own energy and enthusiasm.



What type of energy are you bringing to your classroom or school? I notice some of our students dragging into school with very little energy. What’s it going to take to shift that energy and get them going? Many of our students have developed habits that prevent them from getting the most out of their learning. Those habits won’t change unless we as educators are intentional. We need to change. 



We need to bring so much determination and passion to what we do that students know, “This person is not going to accept less than my best.” Lots of things can stand in the way of learning in a school, let’s make sure it’s not the attitude or enthusiasm of the adults who work there. 



What other ideas do you have for establishing a solid mental approach as an educator? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 5 Thoughts to Improve Your Mental Approach as an Educator



Here’s a reflective question to ask yourself when you’re making decisions about your priorities:



What would happen if you weren’t successful on this one thing?



What would be the ramifications? What would be the price to pay? What would be the cost if this thing did not happen? What would happen if success in this area isn’t made a priority? What would we stand to lose? How would it impact the student, the community, or the world? 



Some things are absolutely essential and some things are nice to see happen and some things really aren’t that important at all. Life’s all about priorities. But how often do we just go with the priorities of what’s been done in the past? 



How often do we accept the priorities of others without even considering if they are best for kids? How often do we push back against the priorities of the status quo because we know we can do better?



There isn’t enough time, energy, or resources to make everything a priority. We have to make good choices about what’s most important and how to apply our energy and effort. We have to establish the priorities that make the biggest difference.



Here are a few examples of my thinking as I work through this thought experiment…



1. What would happen if I didn’t develop the strongest relationships possible with my students?



I would risk losing the learner entirely. They might just check out and not follow my lead on anything. There’s greater chance of behavior problems, attitude problems, parent problems, and more. If the relationship is toxic, nothing I do will be good enough, interesting enough, or important enough. It’s impossible to have extraordinary learning experiences with mediocre relationships.



2. What would happen if students dreaded coming to our school or my classroom every day?



If students hate school, we know they’re going to be disengaged, distracted, and probably agitated. None of those are good conditions for learning. We can wish they would change and magically love school. Or we can change the school and find ways to reduce the friction. What if we made it harder for kids to hate school? What if we created a place where kids who hate (traditional) school love to learn?



3. What would happen if students didn’t get chances to lead and make decisions in this school?



If they don’t have chances to lead and make decisions now, they won’t be ready to lead and make decisions later. They won’t have opportunities to practice and they won’t be primed for leadership and decision making beyond school. Kids need practice leading and making decisions about their learning. They need agency just as much, if not more, than they need achievement. If I simply learn, I will probably forget. But if I have a strong enough learning identity, there is nothing I can’t learn eventually.



4. What would happen if students didn’t master every standard in this school?



They might not score as well as others on standardized tests. They might have some gaps in their learning. They might have to learn some things down the road if they’re faced with situations where they aren’t fully prepared. But is that really the worst thing? Is standards mastery the key to future success? I don’t think it is.



5. What would happen if students didn’t learn soft skills or develop good character in this school?



I’ll answer this question with another question. Would you prefer to have a neighbor that is a caring person or one who has outstanding academic skills? Of course, having both would be great. If you needed help with some complex math problems, they’d be able to help you and care enough about you to be willing to help you. But if you had to make a choice? I’m picking soft skills and character every time.



So what other questions might you ask to test your priorities and your school’s priorities? If we didn’t do this thing, what would happen? Pour your energy into the things that you know count the most. We get most of our results out of a small portion of our effort. We accomplish 80% of our results with just 20% of our effort. The rest of our effort is lost compared to that 20%. If we can learn to apply effort more efficiently, our overall capacity would greatly increase.



Let me know what you think about this thought experiment. Is what you’re doing today moving your students closer to what you want for them tomorrow? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Twitter or Facebook.

Read More What Would Happen If You Weren’t Successful On This Thing?



Daniel Pink wrote about purpose in his best-seller, Drive. He said there are three things that motivate creative peopleautonomy, mastery, and purpose. If we want to create a highly motivating environment in our schools, that also values creativity, it won’t happen by control and compliance or rewards and punishments. 



It will only happen when we provide opportunities for meaningful work, both for teachers and students. We should always be concerned with cultivating meaningful work.



A sense of purpose gives the work relevance. I wonder what most kids think about the purpose for coming to school. It’s mandatory. It’s required. It’s how I can get into college and get a good job someday. My parents make me. It’s important to my parents. At least I see my friends there. The purpose is to get good grades, perhaps? It’s something to be endured. Yikes!



I wonder what would happen if we really focused on helping students find deeper meaning and purpose in their school experience? What if we intentionally helped students find purpose and meaning in learning? Why isn’t that a class we offer? Actually it should be part of every class. Sometimes I think the most important things are completely overlooked.



If school elicited a stronger sense of purpose, what benefits would we see? Here are 7 characteristics of people with purpose. I’m sure there are high-purpose people in your school. I just think we need more of them for sure.



1. High purpose people are willing to take more risks.



They will step out of their comfort zone to move forward because they have a reason to be bold. They know their why. They see the importance of what they’re doing and want to make a difference. Ultimately, risk takers learn more because they don’t retreat from challenges.



2. They’re open to new possibilities.



Most people see problems. And they want conventional solutions. But people with purpose see possibilities. They don’t let problems hold them back. When some people see challenges and obstacles, people with purpose look for opportunities to move forward and learn and grow. 



3. They have more energy and emotion about what they’re doing.



People with high purpose have passion for what they’re doing. They are deeply committed. They are intellectually connected to what they’re doing, but they’re also emotionally connected. They also feel it. They feel passion for their purpose.



4. They have no time for petty disputes or social drama.



Ever wonder how people can get distracted by petty disputes or social drama? It’s lack of purpose. People who are mission focused won’t allow themselves to drift from what’s most important. 



5. They’re intentional.



High purpose people aren’t just going through the motions. Every day is valuable. The wake up determined and go to bed satisfied. They have important work to do. They want to grow and see progress.



6. They don’t allow limits and naysayers to hold them back.



People who lack purpose get very uncomfortable around people with strong purpose. They may even mock their efforts and say it can’t be done or point out the obstacles standing in the way. But people with purpose don’t let these people bring them down. They just try to bring them along. 



7. They’re willing to make repeated efforts.



People who lack purpose may try for a moment or a day. But they quickly get discouraged. They want results, but they don’t want to grind. They aren’t committed enough to the purpose to apply effort consistently until the mission is accomplished. The goal is too important to give up just because it’s hard.



What’s your purpose? You might consider writing a personal mission statement to clarify what drives you to do great work. What gives your life direction? Let me know your thoughts on creating a stronger sense of purpose for educators and students. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter

Read More 7 Characteristics of People with a Strong Sense of Purpose



Daniel Pink wrote about purpose in his best-seller, Drive. He said there are three things that motivate creative peopleautonomy, mastery, and purpose. If we want to create a highly motivating environment in our schools, that also values creativity, it won’t happen by control and compliance or rewards and punishments. 



It will only happen when we provide opportunities for meaningful work, both for teachers and students. We should always be concerned with cultivating meaningful work.



A sense of purpose gives the work relevance. I wonder what most kids think about the purpose for coming to school. It’s mandatory. It’s required. It’s how I can get into college and get a good job someday. My parents make me. It’s important to my parents. At least I see my friends there. The purpose is to get good grades, perhaps? It’s something to be endured. Yikes!



I wonder what would happen if we really focused on helping students find deeper meaning and purpose in their school experience? What if we intentionally helped students find purpose and meaning in learning? Why isn’t that a class we offer? Actually it should be part of every class. Sometimes I think the most important things are completely overlooked.



If school elicited a stronger sense of purpose, what benefits would we see? Here are 7 characteristics of people with purpose. I’m sure there are high-purpose people in your school. I just think we need more of them for sure.



1. High purpose people are willing to take more risks.



They will step out of their comfort zone to move forward because they have a reason to be bold. They know their why. They see the importance of what they’re doing and want to make a difference. Ultimately, risk takers learn more because they don’t retreat from challenges.



2. They’re open to new possibilities.



Most people see problems. And they want conventional solutions. But people with purpose see possibilities. They don’t let problems hold them back. When some people see challenges and obstacles, people with purpose look for opportunities to move forward and learn and grow. 



3. They have more energy and emotion about what they’re doing.



People with high purpose have passion for what they’re doing. They are deeply committed. They are intellectually connected to what they’re doing, but they’re also emotionally connected. They also feel it. They feel passion for their purpose.



4. They have no time for petty disputes or social drama.



Ever wonder how people can get distracted by petty disputes or social drama? It’s lack of purpose. People who are mission focused won’t allow themselves to drift from what’s most important. 



5. They’re intentional.



High purpose people aren’t just going through the motions. Every day is valuable. The wake up determined and go to bed satisfied. They have important work to do. They want to grow and see progress.



6. They don’t allow limits and naysayers to hold them back.



People who lack purpose get very uncomfortable around people with strong purpose. They may even mock their efforts and say it can’t be done or point out the obstacles standing in the way. But people with purpose don’t let these people bring them down. They just try to bring them along. 



7. They’re willing to make repeated efforts.



People who lack purpose may try for a moment or a day. But they quickly get discouraged. They want results, but they don’t want to grind. They aren’t committed enough to the purpose to apply effort consistently until the mission is accomplished. The goal is too important to give up just because it’s hard.



What’s your purpose? You might consider writing a personal mission statement to clarify what drives you to do great work. What gives your life direction? Let me know your thoughts on creating a stronger sense of purpose for educators and students. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter

Read More 7 Characteristics of People with a Strong Sense of Purpose



Daniel Pink wrote about purpose in his best-seller, Drive. He said there are three things that motivate creative peopleautonomy, mastery, and purpose. If we want to create a highly motivating environment in our schools, that also values creativity, it won’t happen by control and compliance or rewards and punishments. 



It will only happen when we provide opportunities for meaningful work, both for teachers and students. We should always be concerned with cultivating meaningful work.



A sense of purpose gives the work relevance. I wonder what most kids think about the purpose for coming to school. It’s mandatory. It’s required. It’s how I can get into college and get a good job someday. My parents make me. It’s important to my parents. At least I see my friends there. The purpose is to get good grades, perhaps? It’s something to be endured. Yikes!



I wonder what would happen if we really focused on helping students find deeper meaning and purpose in their school experience? What if we intentionally helped students find purpose and meaning in learning? Why isn’t that a class we offer? Actually it should be part of every class. Sometimes I think the most important things are completely overlooked.



If school elicited a stronger sense of purpose, what benefits would we see? Here are 7 characteristics of people with purpose. I’m sure there are high-purpose people in your school. I just think we need more of them for sure.



1. High purpose people are willing to take more risks.



They will step out of their comfort zone to move forward because they have a reason to be bold. They know their why. They see the importance of what they’re doing and want to make a difference. Ultimately, risk takers learn more because they don’t retreat from challenges.



2. They’re open to new possibilities.



Most people see problems. And they want conventional solutions. But people with purpose see possibilities. They don’t let problems hold them back. When some people see challenges and obstacles, people with purpose look for opportunities to move forward and learn and grow. 



3. They have more energy and emotion about what they’re doing.



People with high purpose have passion for what they’re doing. They are deeply committed. They are intellectually connected to what they’re doing, but they’re also emotionally connected. They also feel it. They feel passion for their purpose.



4. They have no time for petty disputes or social drama.



Ever wonder how people can get distracted by petty disputes or social drama? It’s lack of purpose. People who are mission focused won’t allow themselves to drift from what’s most important. 



5. They’re intentional.



High purpose people aren’t just going through the motions. Every day is valuable. The wake up determined and go to bed satisfied. They have important work to do. They want to grow and see progress.



6. They don’t allow limits and naysayers to hold them back.



People who lack purpose get very uncomfortable around people with strong purpose. They may even mock their efforts and say it can’t be done or point out the obstacles standing in the way. But people with purpose don’t let these people bring them down. They just try to bring them along. 



7. They’re willing to make repeated efforts.



People who lack purpose may try for a moment or a day. But they quickly get discouraged. They want results, but they don’t want to grind. They aren’t committed enough to the purpose to apply effort consistently until the mission is accomplished. The goal is too important to give up just because it’s hard.



What’s your purpose? You might consider writing a personal mission statement to clarify what drives you to do great work. What gives your life direction? Let me know your thoughts on creating a stronger sense of purpose for educators and students. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter

      

Read More 7 Characteristics of People with a Strong Sense of Purpose



Daniel Pink wrote about purpose in his best-seller, Drive. He said there are three things that motivate creative peopleautonomy, mastery, and purpose. If we want to create a highly motivating environment in our schools, that also values creativity, it won’t happen by control and compliance or rewards and punishments. 



It will only happen when we provide opportunities for meaningful work, both for teachers and students. We should always be concerned with cultivating meaningful work.



A sense of purpose gives the work relevance. I wonder what most kids think about the purpose for coming to school. It’s mandatory. It’s required. It’s how I can get into college and get a good job someday. My parents make me. It’s important to my parents. At least I see my friends there. The purpose is to get good grades, perhaps? It’s something to be endured. Yikes!



I wonder what would happen if we really focused on helping students find deeper meaning and purpose in their school experience? What if we intentionally helped students find purpose and meaning in learning? Why isn’t that a class we offer? Actually it should be part of every class. Sometimes I think the most important things are completely overlooked.



If school elicited a stronger sense of purpose, what benefits would we see? Here are 7 characteristics of people with purpose. I’m sure there are high-purpose people in your school. I just think we need more of them for sure.



1. High purpose people are willing to take more risks.



They will step out of their comfort zone to move forward because they have a reason to be bold. They know their why. They see the importance of what they’re doing and want to make a difference. Ultimately, risk takers learn more because they don’t retreat from challenges.



2. They’re open to new possibilities.



Most people see problems. And they want conventional solutions. But people with purpose see possibilities. They don’t let problems hold them back. When some people see challenges and obstacles, people with purpose look for opportunities to move forward and learn and grow. 



3. They have more energy and emotion about what they’re doing.



People with high purpose have passion for what they’re doing. They are deeply committed. They are intellectually connected to what they’re doing, but they’re also emotionally connected. They also feel it. They feel passion for their purpose.



4. They have no time for petty disputes or social drama.



Ever wonder how people can get distracted by petty disputes or social drama? It’s lack of purpose. People who are mission focused won’t allow themselves to drift from what’s most important. 



5. They’re intentional.



High purpose people aren’t just going through the motions. Every day is valuable. The wake up determined and go to bed satisfied. They have important work to do. They want to grow and see progress.



6. They don’t allow limits and naysayers to hold them back.



People who lack purpose get very uncomfortable around people with strong purpose. They may even mock their efforts and say it can’t be done or point out the obstacles standing in the way. But people with purpose don’t let these people bring them down. They just try to bring them along. 



7. They’re willing to make repeated efforts.



People who lack purpose may try for a moment or a day. But they quickly get discouraged. They want results, but they don’t want to grind. They aren’t committed enough to the purpose to apply effort consistently until the mission is accomplished. The goal is too important to give up just because it’s hard.



What’s your purpose? You might consider writing a personal mission statement to clarify what drives you to do great work. What gives your life direction? Let me know your thoughts on creating a stronger sense of purpose for educators and students. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter

      

Read More 7 Characteristics of People with a Strong Sense of Purpose





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations and make sure they are clear.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

      

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

      

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

      

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.