Tag: Positive Mindset



When I was fresh out of college, it was time to start my career as an educator. I was very passionate about the game of basketball, and that was part of the reason I wanted to teach and coach. I had passion for the game. I still love it today and look forward to the start of college basketball season.



But while I had passion, I didn’t necessarily have a strong or clear purpose. I was just finding my way.



Although passion is great, we can be passionate about things that lack significance. We can be passionate about a game. We can be passionate about cars, or coffee, or even Netflix. Certainly, there’s nothing wrong with passion and enthusiasm for these things. But it’s not something with inherently larger meaning or significance.



Purpose, on the other hand, is about having a mission. It’s about living a life of meaning and significance in a very intentional way. I’m defining purpose here as something that transcends what we do and becomes more about who we are.



It’s not what you do, it’s why you do it.



Your true purpose isn’t limited to one role in particular. I can carry out my purpose through my role as a principal, or as a dad, or as a writer through blogging or writing books. I can carry out my purpose in whole variety of ways. I can also carry it out in casual conversations with just about anyone I meet. 



While I am passionate about being a principal, who I am is much bigger than my profession. My overarching purpose is much bigger than my title. Don’t get me wrong, being a principal is one of the most rewarding ways I get to share my purpose. I love it. 



But my why is still much bigger.



My why is to help others grow their own capacity and find their personal path of purpose. A purpose that has power adds value to people. It focuses on making things better for others.



My passions may change over time, but for the most part, I believe my purpose will only grow stronger.



There are so many reasons to live out your purpose…

1. No one can take away your purpose. Some things we are passionate about might be taken from us. Don’t build your foundation on something you might lose.

2. Your purpose is usually developed, not discovered. We grow into our purpose. It doesn’t just arrive like the mail is delivered. It’s grown like the largest tree in your back yard. 

3. You won’t be fulfilled if you aren’t fulfilling your purpose. You’ll be restless and uneasy and searching for meaning. So many people are searching for happiness and what they really desire is purpose.

4. Apathy is no match for true purpose. The key to motivation is to know your why.

5. When you connect with people who share your purpose, it’s electrifying. You feel understood and energized. It’s like doubling the voltage.

6. When you have a strong sense of purpose, obstacles are no match for your persistence and perseverance.

7. Your purpose will give you a sense of peace. You’ll know you’re doing exactly what you’re supposed to be doing when you’re living out your purpose.



What are your thoughts on living with a sense of purpose? How can we help our students find meaning and significance? How can we help them find a path of purpose? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Passion Flows from Purpose



When I was fresh out of college, it was time to start my career as an educator. I was very passionate about the game of basketball, and that was part of the reason I wanted to teach and coach. I had passion for the game. I still love it today and look forward to the start of college basketball season.



But while I had passion, I didn’t necessarily have a strong or clear purpose. I was just finding my way.



Although passion is great, we can be passionate about things that lack significance. We can be passionate about a game. We can be passionate about cars, or coffee, or even Netflix. Certainly, there’s nothing wrong with passion and enthusiasm for these things. But it’s not something with inherently larger meaning or significance.



Purpose, on the other hand, is about having a mission. It’s about living a life of meaning and significance in a very intentional way. I’m defining purpose here as something that transcends what we do and becomes more about who we are.



It’s not what you do, it’s why you do it.



Your true purpose isn’t limited to one role in particular. I can carry out my purpose through my role as a principal, or as a dad, or as a writer through blogging or writing books. I can carry out my purpose in whole variety of ways. I can also carry it out in casual conversations with just about anyone I meet. 



While I am passionate about being a principal, who I am is much bigger than my profession. My overarching purpose is much bigger than my title. Don’t get me wrong, being a principal is one of the most rewarding ways I get to share my purpose. I love it. 



But my why is still much bigger.



My why is to help others grow their own capacity and find their personal path of purpose. A purpose that has power adds value to people. It focuses on making things better for others.



My passions may change over time, but for the most part, I believe my purpose will only grow stronger.



There are so many reasons to live out your purpose…

1. No one can take away your purpose. Some things we are passionate about might be taken from us. Don’t build your foundation on something you might lose.

2. Your purpose is usually developed, not discovered. We grow into our purpose. It doesn’t just arrive like the mail is delivered. It’s grown like the largest tree in your back yard. 

3. You won’t be fulfilled if you aren’t fulfilling your purpose. You’ll be restless and uneasy and searching for meaning. So many people are searching for happiness and what they really desire is purpose.

4. Apathy is no match for true purpose. The key to motivation is to know your why.

5. When you connect with people who share your purpose, it’s electrifying. You feel understood and energized. It’s like doubling the voltage.

6. When you have a strong sense of purpose, obstacles are no match for your persistence and perseverance.

7. Your purpose will give you a sense of peace. You’ll know you’re doing exactly what you’re supposed to be doing when you’re living out your purpose.



What are your thoughts on living with a sense of purpose? How can we help our students find meaning and significance? How can we help them find a path of purpose? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Passion Flows from Purpose



I’ve been thinking quite a bit lately about negative student behaviors and how we respond effectively. 


Here are five ideas that have been on my mind…


1. Judge behaviors, not intentions.



It can be really easy to become judgmental about negative student behavior, especially when it’s repetitive. It’s always appropriate to be corrective about non-learning behaviors, but it isn’t right to place ourselves in a position of greater worth than the student. We might think, I would never do that. It’s like we think we’re superior in some way. And then we make generalizations about their motives based on the behavior. We act as if we know what’s going on in the student’s heart. 


That’s the type of judgment that causes resentment and steals dignity. Judgement isn’t always a bad thing. We actually know having good judgement is a good thing. That’s how we know when something is right or wrong. But relationships get crazy when we start to judge motives. That’s not ours to judge. Judge behaviors. They are observable and there are standards that must be held. Don’t judge intentions. We can never know another person’s heart.


2. We make mistakes too, just like our students.



Every negative behavior a student exhibits is probably closely resembling a negative behavior I’ve exhibited in my own life at one time or another. If I’m really honest with myself, it’s probably like I’m looking in the mirror. I may not have done that exact thing to the degree that it was done, but I’ve struggled with that issue at some point and acted in a similar manner. There are only so many categories of mistakes, and I’m pretty sure I’ve covered them all at one time or another.


3. Correct the issue and preserve the relationship.



Number two is really important because it reminds me to have empathy, to be understanding, and to work with a student through the issue instead of towering over them and being iron-fisted about the issue. We want to correct the issue and preserve the relationship. We need to walk through this with the student.


4. Are there certain student behaviors that really push my buttons more than others?



The things that push my buttons the most might be the things that I actually struggle with the most. It’s ironic, but often we are less forgiving and less patient with the behaviors that are most like the ones we struggle with. Think about an issue that is a struggle for you. Are you especially hard on students when they make a mistake in this area? Maybe not if they make the mistake in the same way you do. But if they make it in a different way or to a greater degree, look out. It might push all your buttons.


5. Change the environment to help the child change his or her own behavior.



When students show up poorly and have behaviors that are destructive, I need to also look at the environmental factors at play. If I was in the same environment as the student, might I also act in this way? What can be changed about the environment to help the student make different choices? That does not relieve the student of responsibility or accountability for bad decisions, but I don’t want to just enforce accountability. I want to help create conditions so the student will succeed next time.


I think we could all stand to be a little more patient with our students. Heck, sometimes we need to be a little more patient with ourselves too. Mistakes are opportunities to learn more about who we are and to reflect and become stronger, more caring people overall.


I would love to hear your thoughts as always. What’s on your mind after reading this post? Leave a comment below or respond on Twitter or Facebook.

Read More When Student Behavior Is Like Looking in the Mirror



I’ve been thinking quite a bit lately about negative student behaviors and how we respond effectively. 


Here are five ideas that have been on my mind…


1. Judge behaviors, not intentions.



It can be really easy to become judgmental about negative student behavior, especially when it’s repetitive. It’s always appropriate to be corrective about non-learning behaviors, but it isn’t right to place ourselves in a position of greater worth than the student. We might think, I would never do that. It’s like we think we’re superior in some way. And then we make generalizations about their motives based on the behavior. We act as if we know what’s going on in the student’s heart. 


That’s the type of judgment that causes resentment and steals dignity. Judgement isn’t always a bad thing. We actually know having good judgement is a good thing. That’s how we know when something is right or wrong. But relationships get crazy when we start to judge motives. That’s not ours to judge. Judge behaviors. They are observable and there are standards that must be held. Don’t judge intentions. We can never know another person’s heart.


2. We make mistakes too, just like our students.



Every negative behavior a student exhibits is probably closely resembling a negative behavior I’ve exhibited in my own life at one time or another. If I’m really honest with myself, it’s probably like I’m looking in the mirror. I may not have done that exact thing to the degree that it was done, but I’ve struggled with that issue at some point and acted in a similar manner. There are only so many categories of mistakes, and I’m pretty sure I’ve covered them all at one time or another.


3. Correct the issue and preserve the relationship.



Number two is really important because it reminds me to have empathy, to be understanding, and to work with a student through the issue instead of towering over them and being iron-fisted about the issue. We want to correct the issue and preserve the relationship. We need to walk through this with the student.


4. Are there certain student behaviors that really push my buttons more than others?



The things that push my buttons the most might be the things that I actually struggle with the most. It’s ironic, but often we are less forgiving and less patient with the behaviors that are most like the ones we struggle with. Think about an issue that is a struggle for you. Are you especially hard on students when they make a mistake in this area? Maybe not if they make the mistake in the same way you do. But if they make it in a different way or to a greater degree, look out. It might push all your buttons.


5. Change the environment to help the child change his or her own behavior.



When students show up poorly and have behaviors that are destructive, I need to also look at the environmental factors at play. If I was in the same environment as the student, might I also act in this way? What can be changed about the environment to help the student make different choices? That does not relieve the student of responsibility or accountability for bad decisions, but I don’t want to just enforce accountability. I want to help create conditions so the student will succeed next time.


I think we could all stand to be a little more patient with our students. Heck, sometimes we need to be a little more patient with ourselves too. Mistakes are opportunities to learn more about who we are and to reflect and become stronger, more caring people overall.


I would love to hear your thoughts as always. What’s on your mind after reading this post? Leave a comment below or respond on Twitter or Facebook.

Read More When Student Behavior Is Like Looking in the Mirror



I’ve been thinking quite a bit lately about negative student behaviors and how we respond effectively. 


Here are five ideas that have been on my mind…


1. It can be really easy to become judgmental about negative student behavior, especially when it’s repetitive. It’s always appropriate to be corrective about non-learning behaviors, but it isn’t right to place ourselves in a position of greater worth than the student. We might think, I would never do that. It’s like we think we’re superior in some way. And then we make generalizations about their motives based on the behavior. We act as if we know what’s going on in the student’s heart. 


That’s the type of judgment that causes resentment and steals dignity. Judgement isn’t always a bad thing. We actually know having good judgement is a good thing. That’s how we know when something is right or wrong. But relationships get crazy when we start to judge motives. That’s not ours to judge. Judge behaviors. They are observable and there are standards that must be held. Don’t judge intentions. We can never know another person’s heart.


2. Every negative behavior a student exhibits is probably closely resembling a negative behavior I’ve exhibited in my own life at one time or another. If I’m really honest with myself, it’s probably like I’m looking in the mirror. I may not have done that exact thing to the degree that it was done, but I’ve struggled with that issue at some point and acted in a similar manner. There are only so many categories of mistakes, and I’m pretty sure I’ve covered them all at one time or another.


3. Number two is really important because it reminds me to have empathy, to be understanding, and to work with a student through the issue instead of towering over them and being iron-fisted about the issue. We want to correct the issue and preserve the relationship. We need to walk through this with the student.


4. The things that push my buttons the most might be the things that I actually struggle with the most. It’s ironic, but often we are less forgiving and less patient with the behaviors that are most like the ones we struggle with. Think about an issue that is a struggle for you. Are you especially hard on students when they make a mistake in this area? Maybe not if they make the mistake in the same way you do. But if they make it in a different way or to a greater degree, look out. It might push all your buttons.


5. When students show up poorly and have behaviors that are destructive, I need to also look at the environmental factors at play. If I was in the same environment as the student, might I also act in this way? What can be changed about the environment to help the student make different choices? That does not relieve the student of responsibility or accountability for bad decisions, but I don’t want to just enforce accountability. I want to help create conditions so the student will succeed next time.


I think we could all stand to be a little more patient with our students. Heck, sometimes we need to be a little more patient with ourselves too. Mistakes are opportunities to learn more about who we are and to reflect and become stronger, more caring people overall.


I would love to hear your thoughts as always. What’s on your mind after reading this post? Leave a comment below or respond on Twitter or Facebook.

Read More When Student Behavior Is Like Looking in the Mirror



I’ve been thinking quite a bit lately about negative student behaviors and how we respond effectively. 


Here are five ideas that have been on my mind…


1. Judge behaviors, not intentions.



It can be really easy to become judgmental about negative student behavior, especially when it’s repetitive. It’s always appropriate to be corrective about non-learning behaviors, but it isn’t right to place ourselves in a position of greater worth than the student. We might think, I would never do that. It’s like we think we’re superior in some way. And then we make generalizations about their motives based on the behavior. We act as if we know what’s going on in the student’s heart. 


That’s the type of judgment that causes resentment and steals dignity. Judgement isn’t always a bad thing. We actually know having good judgement is a good thing. That’s how we know when something is right or wrong. But relationships get crazy when we start to judge motives. That’s not ours to judge. Judge behaviors. They are observable and there are standards that must be held. Don’t judge intentions. We can never know another person’s heart.


2. We make mistakes too, just like our students.



Every negative behavior a student exhibits is probably closely resembling a negative behavior I’ve exhibited in my own life at one time or another. If I’m really honest with myself, it’s probably like I’m looking in the mirror. I may not have done that exact thing to the degree that it was done, but I’ve struggled with that issue at some point and acted in a similar manner. There are only so many categories of mistakes, and I’m pretty sure I’ve covered them all at one time or another.


3. Correct the issue and preserve the relationship.



Number two is really important because it reminds me to have empathy, to be understanding, and to work with a student through the issue instead of towering over them and being iron-fisted about the issue. We want to correct the issue and preserve the relationship. We need to walk through this with the student.


4. Are there certain student behaviors that really push my buttons more than others?



The things that push my buttons the most might be the things that I actually struggle with the most. It’s ironic, but often we are less forgiving and less patient with the behaviors that are most like the ones we struggle with. Think about an issue that is a struggle for you. Are you especially hard on students when they make a mistake in this area? Maybe not if they make the mistake in the same way you do. But if they make it in a different way or to a greater degree, look out. It might push all your buttons.


5. Change the environment to help the child change his or her own behavior.



When students show up poorly and have behaviors that are destructive, I need to also look at the environmental factors at play. If I was in the same environment as the student, might I also act in this way? What can be changed about the environment to help the student make different choices? That does not relieve the student of responsibility or accountability for bad decisions, but I don’t want to just enforce accountability. I want to help create conditions so the student will succeed next time.


I think we could all stand to be a little more patient with our students. Heck, sometimes we need to be a little more patient with ourselves too. Mistakes are opportunities to learn more about who we are and to reflect and become stronger, more caring people overall.


I would love to hear your thoughts as always. What’s on your mind after reading this post? Leave a comment below or respond on Twitter or Facebook.

Read More When Student Behavior Is Like Looking in the Mirror



I’ve been thinking quite a bit lately about negative student behaviors and how we respond effectively. 


Here are five ideas that have been on my mind…


1. Judge behaviors, not intentions.



It can be really easy to become judgmental about negative student behavior, especially when it’s repetitive. It’s always appropriate to be corrective about non-learning behaviors, but it isn’t right to place ourselves in a position of greater worth than the student. We might think, I would never do that. It’s like we think we’re superior in some way. And then we make generalizations about their motives based on the behavior. We act as if we know what’s going on in the student’s heart. 


That’s the type of judgment that causes resentment and steals dignity. Judgement isn’t always a bad thing. We actually know having good judgement is a good thing. That’s how we know when something is right or wrong. But relationships get crazy when we start to judge motives. That’s not ours to judge. Judge behaviors. They are observable and there are standards that must be held. Don’t judge intentions. We can never know another person’s heart.


2. We make mistakes too, just like our students.



Every negative behavior a student exhibits is probably closely resembling a negative behavior I’ve exhibited in my own life at one time or another. If I’m really honest with myself, it’s probably like I’m looking in the mirror. I may not have done that exact thing to the degree that it was done, but I’ve struggled with that issue at some point and acted in a similar manner. There are only so many categories of mistakes, and I’m pretty sure I’ve covered them all at one time or another.


3. Correct the issue and preserve the relationship.



Number two is really important because it reminds me to have empathy, to be understanding, and to work with a student through the issue instead of towering over them and being iron-fisted about the issue. We want to correct the issue and preserve the relationship. We need to walk through this with the student.


4. Are there certain student behaviors that really push my buttons more than others?



The things that push my buttons the most might be the things that I actually struggle with the most. It’s ironic, but often we are less forgiving and less patient with the behaviors that are most like the ones we struggle with. Think about an issue that is a struggle for you. Are you especially hard on students when they make a mistake in this area? Maybe not if they make the mistake in the same way you do. But if they make it in a different way or to a greater degree, look out. It might push all your buttons.


5. Change the environment to help the child change his or her own behavior.



When students show up poorly and have behaviors that are destructive, I need to also look at the environmental factors at play. If I was in the same environment as the student, might I also act in this way? What can be changed about the environment to help the student make different choices? That does not relieve the student of responsibility or accountability for bad decisions, but I don’t want to just enforce accountability. I want to help create conditions so the student will succeed next time.


I think we could all stand to be a little more patient with our students. Heck, sometimes we need to be a little more patient with ourselves too. Mistakes are opportunities to learn more about who we are and to reflect and become stronger, more caring people overall.


I would love to hear your thoughts as always. What’s on your mind after reading this post? Leave a comment below or respond on Twitter or Facebook.

Read More When Student Behavior Is Like Looking in the Mirror



Teaching is a challenging and exhausting profession. No one can understand what it’s like until you’ve experienced it. You make untold numbers of decisions every day. You work with kids who have all sorts of unique and sometimes unrelenting needs. 



The pressure is real. Sometimes it feels like you’re just treading water and then someone hands you a concrete block. So you better be a great swimmer! Ha.



I hear lots of ideas about educators dealing with stress. You need to make time for yourself. You need to recharge in the summer and on weekends. You need to have a healthy work/life balance. All of those things are probably true.



But for me, the biggest thing that helps me stay positive, productive, and energized is daily renewal. And that comes in the form of my morning routine and my mental approach throughout the day. I’m renewing in the morning and then I’m renewing by disciplining my thoughts throughout the day.



For the past couple of months, I’ve really focused on my making my mornings more effective. I’ve always tried to have a routine in the morning, but last school year at times I wasn’t as diligent. And I could definitely tell a difference.



More recently, I’m making my mornings count, and everything I’m doing seems to be working better. I feel more effective. I have more energy. My relationships are stronger. I’m more patient. More productive. More focused. More determined. I feel stronger overall.



So here’s what I’m doing differently. I don’t do every single one of these things every morning, but I do several of them each day. Being able to pick and choose gives my routine some variety. The routine can take me an hour or more, but there have been mornings I needed to get to school early, and I’ve done an abbreviated version in 10 minutes.



1. Smile



Start the day by finding something to smile about. Choose to smile. Research has shown the physical act of smiling has benefits for stress recovery, improved mood, and creativity. (Time: 30 seconds)



2. Breathe



I’m using a meditation app to work on focused breathing and meditation. There are several smartphone apps available, and I’ve tried a couple of them. Practicing mindfulness is great for increased focus, reduced anxiety, and improved cognition. (Time: 3-5 minutes)

3. Be Grateful



Gratitude is powerful for feeling better, having more energy, and training your brain to look for good things. I follow the advice of author MK Mueller. Be grateful for three things that have happened in the last 24 hours with no repeats ever. It’s great to share your gratitude with someone or journal about it. (Time: 3-5 minutes)



4. Move



This one I’m including every day in my routine. I do something to be physically active each morning. It might be running several miles. Or, it might be a two-minute plank and that’s all. But I’m getting some type of exercise in my routine every morning. (Time: 2 minutes-1 hour)



5. Envision



Almost all great athletes use mental imagery to gain an edge. When you imagine exactly how you want a situation, interaction, event, or performance to go, it creates a mental model for success. It sets the stage for success. I spend a few moments each morning thinking about desired outcomes. I think about these things as if the outcome has already been established, as if they are already true. I think it until I feel it. (Time 2-5 minutes) 



6. Affirm



This practice is similar to envisioning except it is focused on self more than situation. So I’m thinking about characteristics I’m developing in myself as if they are already present at the desired level. I tell myself the things that I value and that I want to become. It helps clarify my values and focuses my growth. (Time 2-5 minutes)



7. Read



Like movement and exercise, I also make reading part of every morning. I keep a list of books to read and have several people in my life who share book suggestions with me. I also try to read blog posts and, of course, Twitter posts from my PLN. I can’t imagine not making reading a habit in my life. The things I continually learn add so much value to who I am and what I am striving to accomplish in life. (Time 15-45 minutes)



8. Reflect



I often think back over recent events during my morning routine. I think about decisions or interactions and what I can learn from them. What’s working? What’s not working? I’m careful not to beat myself up if something didn’t go well. I simply consider what I could do better next time and keep my focus on the future. If I can’t do something to improve myself or the situation, then I’m not going to continue thinking about it. Worry and regret is disempowering. I want to spend my time thinking in empowered ways. (Time 2-5 minutes)



9. Pray



If you’re not a person of faith, you may choose to skip right over this one. I don’t want to push my faith on anyone. I realize a person’s beliefs about God are…well, deeply personal. But I must share this part of my morning, because for me, spending time in prayer is the most valuable part of my daily routine. I have a list of things I pray about each morning. They are things that are very important to me. I must also share that my prayer life often intersects with each of the other parts of my routine. My whole morning routine is basically my focused time with God. So I’m often praying while I’m exercising or reflecting. I want to start my day by meeting with God, so I’m more effective as I meet with people throughout the day. (Time 5-10 minutes)



I realize this seems like a long list of things to do, especially if you don’t like getting up early in the morning. Keep in mind I don’t do all of these every day. And the amount of time I spend on each one varies also. 



If you want to reduce stress, have more energy, and increase your effectiveness, I highly recommend developing your morning routine. How you spend the first hour of your day will have a big impact on how the rest of your day goes. Make it count.



What are some of your morning routines? Are you intentional about daily renewal? What are your thoughts about reducing stress and increasing your effectiveness? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Importance of Daily Renewal for Educators



Teaching is a challenging and exhausting profession. No one can understand what it’s like until you’ve experienced it. You make untold numbers of decisions every day. You work with kids who have all sorts of unique and sometimes unrelenting needs. 



The pressure is real. Sometimes it feels like you’re just treading water and then someone hands you a concrete block. So you better be a great swimmer! Ha.



I hear lots of ideas about educators dealing with stress. You need to make time for yourself. You need to recharge in the summer and on weekends. You need to have a healthy work/life balance. All of those things are probably true.



But for me, the biggest thing that helps me stay positive, productive, and energized is daily renewal. And that comes in the form of my morning routine and my mental approach throughout the day. I’m renewing in the morning and then I’m renewing by disciplining my thoughts throughout the day.



For the past couple of months, I’ve really focused on my making my mornings more effective. I’ve always tried to have a routine in the morning, but last school year at times I wasn’t as diligent. And I could definitely tell a difference.



More recently, I’m making my mornings count, and everything I’m doing seems to be working better. I feel more effective. I have more energy. My relationships are stronger. I’m more patient. More productive. More focused. More determined. I feel stronger overall.



So here’s what I’m doing differently. I don’t do every single one of these things every morning, but I do several of them each day. Being able to pick and choose gives my routine some variety. The routine can take me an hour or more, but there have been mornings I needed to get to school early, and I’ve done an abbreviated version in 10 minutes.



1. Smile



Start the day by finding something to smile about. Choose to smile. Research has shown the physical act of smiling has benefits for stress recovery, improved mood, and creativity. (Time: 30 seconds)



2. Breathe



I’m using a meditation app to work on focused breathing and meditation. There are several smartphone apps available, and I’ve tried a couple of them. Practicing mindfulness is great for increased focus, reduced anxiety, and improved cognition. (Time: 3-5 minutes)

3. Be Grateful



Gratitude is powerful for feeling better, having more energy, and training your brain to look for good things. I follow the advice of author MK Mueller. Be grateful for three things that have happened in the last 24 hours with no repeats ever. It’s great to share your gratitude with someone or journal about it. (Time: 3-5 minutes)



4. Move



This one I’m including every day in my routine. I do something to be physically active each morning. It might be running several miles. Or, it might be a two-minute plank and that’s all. But I’m getting some type of exercise in my routine every morning. (Time: 2 minutes-1 hour)



5. Envision



Almost all great athletes use mental imagery to gain an edge. When you imagine exactly how you want a situation, interaction, event, or performance to go, it creates a mental model for success. It sets the stage for success. I spend a few moments each morning thinking about desired outcomes. I think about these things as if the outcome has already been established, as if they are already true. I think it until I feel it. (Time 2-5 minutes) 



6. Affirm



This practice is similar to envisioning except it is focused on self more than situation. So I’m thinking about characteristics I’m developing in myself as if they are already present at the desired level. I tell myself the things that I value and that I want to become. It helps clarify my values and focuses my growth. (Time 2-5 minutes)



7. Read



Like movement and exercise, I also make reading part of every morning. I keep a list of books to read and have several people in my life who share book suggestions with me. I also try to read blog posts and, of course, Twitter posts from my PLN. I can’t imagine not making reading a habit in my life. The things I continually learn add so much value to who I am and what I am striving to accomplish in life. (Time 15-45 minutes)



8. Reflect



I often think back over recent events during my morning routine. I think about decisions or interactions and what I can learn from them. What’s working? What’s not working? I’m careful not to beat myself up if something didn’t go well. I simply consider what I could do better next time and keep my focus on the future. If I can’t do something to improve myself or the situation, then I’m not going to continue thinking about it. Worry and regret is disempowering. I want to spend my time thinking in empowered ways. (Time 2-5 minutes)



9. Pray



If you’re not a person of faith, you may choose to skip right over this one. I don’t want to push my faith on anyone. I realize a person’s beliefs about God are…well, deeply personal. But I must share this part of my morning, because for me, spending time in prayer is the most valuable part of my daily routine. I have a list of things I pray about each morning. They are things that are very important to me. I must also share that my prayer life often intersects with each of the other parts of my routine. My whole morning routine is basically my focused time with God. So I’m often praying while I’m exercising or reflecting. I want to start my day by meeting with God, so I’m more effective as I meet with people throughout the day. (Time 5-10 minutes)



I realize this seems like a long list of things to do, especially if you don’t like getting up early in the morning. Keep in mind I don’t do all of these every day. And the amount of time I spend on each one varies also. 



If you want to reduce stress, have more energy, and increase your effectiveness, I highly recommend developing your morning routine. How you spend the first hour of your day will have a big impact on how the rest of your day goes. Make it count.



What are some of your morning routines? Are you intentional about daily renewal? What are your thoughts about reducing stress and increasing your effectiveness? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Importance of Daily Renewal for Educators



Teaching is a challenging and exhausting profession. No one can understand what it’s like until you’ve experienced it. You make untold numbers of decisions every day. You work with kids who have all sorts of unique and sometimes unrelenting needs. 



The pressure is real. Sometimes it feels like you’re just treading water and then someone hands you a concrete block. So you better be a great swimmer! Ha.



I hear lots of ideas about educators dealing with stress. You need to make time for yourself. You need to recharge in the summer and on weekends. You need to have a healthy work/life balance. All of those things are probably true.



But for me, the biggest thing that helps me stay positive, productive, and energized is daily renewal. And that comes in the form of my morning routine and my mental approach throughout the day. I’m renewing in the morning and then I’m renewing by disciplining my thoughts throughout the day.



For the past couple of months, I’ve really focused on my making my mornings more effective. I’ve always tried to have a routine in the morning, but last school year at times I wasn’t as diligent. And I could definitely tell a difference.



More recently, I’m making my mornings count, and everything I’m doing seems to be working better. I feel more effective. I have more energy. My relationships are stronger. I’m more patient. More productive. More focused. More determined. I feel stronger overall.



So here’s what I’m doing differently. I don’t do every single one of these things every morning, but I do several of them each day. Being able to pick and choose gives my routine some variety. The routine can take me an hour or more, but there have been mornings I needed to get to school early, and I’ve done an abbreviated version in 10 minutes.



1. Smile



Start the day by finding something to smile about. Choose to smile. Research has shown the physical act of smiling has benefits for stress recovery, improved mood, and creativity. (Time: 30 seconds)



2. Breathe



I’m using a meditation app to work on focused breathing and meditation. There are several smartphone apps available, and I’ve tried a couple of them. Practicing mindfulness is great for increased focus, reduced anxiety, and improved cognition. (Time: 3-5 minutes)

3. Be Grateful



Gratitude is powerful for feeling better, having more energy, and training your brain to look for good things. I follow the advice of author MK Mueller. Be grateful for three things that have happened in the last 24 hours with no repeats ever. It’s great to share your gratitude with someone or journal about it. (Time: 3-5 minutes)



4. Move



This one I’m including every day in my routine. I do something to be physically active each morning. It might be running several miles. Or, it might be a two-minute plank and that’s all. But I’m getting some type of exercise in my routine every morning. (Time: 2 minutes-1 hour)



5. Envision



Almost all great athletes use mental imagery to gain an edge. When you imagine exactly how you want a situation, interaction, event, or performance to go, it creates a mental model for success. It sets the stage for success. I spend a few moments each morning thinking about desired outcomes. I think about these things as if the outcome has already been established, as if they are already true. I think it until I feel it. (Time 2-5 minutes) 



6. Affirm



This practice is similar to envisioning except it is focused on self more than situation. So I’m thinking about characteristics I’m developing in myself as if they are already present at the desired level. I tell myself the things that I value and that I want to become. It helps clarify my values and focuses my growth. (Time 2-5 minutes)



7. Read



Like movement and exercise, I also make reading part of every morning. I keep a list of books to read and have several people in my life who share book suggestions with me. I also try to read blog posts and, of course, Twitter posts from my PLN. I can’t imagine not making reading a habit in my life. The things I continually learn add so much value to who I am and what I am striving to accomplish in life. (Time 15-45 minutes)



8. Reflect



I often think back over recent events during my morning routine. I think about decisions or interactions and what I can learn from them. What’s working? What’s not working? I’m careful not to beat myself up if something didn’t go well. I simply consider what I could do better next time and keep my focus on the future. If I can’t do something to improve myself or the situation, then I’m not going to continue thinking about it. Worry and regret is disempowering. I want to spend my time thinking in empowered ways. (Time 2-5 minutes)



9. Pray



If you’re not a person of faith, you may choose to skip right over this one. I don’t want to push my faith on anyone. I realize a person’s beliefs about God are…well, deeply personal. But I must share this part of my morning, because for me, spending time in prayer is the most valuable part of my daily routine. I have a list of things I pray about each morning. They are things that are very important to me. I must also share that my prayer life often intersects with each of the other parts of my routine. My whole morning routine is basically my focused time with God. So I’m often praying while I’m exercising or reflecting. I want to start my day by meeting with God, so I’m more effective as I meet with people throughout the day. (Time 5-10 minutes)



I realize this seems like a long list of things to do, especially if you don’t like getting up early in the morning. Keep in mind I don’t do all of these every day. And the amount of time I spend on each one varies also. 



If you want to reduce stress, have more energy, and increase your effectiveness, I highly recommend developing your morning routine. How you spend the first hour of your day will have a big impact on how the rest of your day goes. Make it count.



What are some of your morning routines? Are you intentional about daily renewal? What are your thoughts about reducing stress and increasing your effectiveness? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Importance of Daily Renewal for Educators



Teaching is a challenging and exhausting profession. No one can understand what it’s like until you’ve experienced it. You make untold numbers of decisions every day. You work with kids who have all sorts of unique and sometimes unrelenting needs. 



The pressure is real. Sometimes it feels like you’re just treading water and then someone hands you a concrete block. So you better be a great swimmer! Ha.



I hear lots of ideas about educators dealing with stress. You need to make time for yourself. You need to recharge in the summer and on weekends. You need to have a healthy work/life balance. All of those things are probably true.



But for me, the biggest thing that helps me stay positive, productive, and energized is daily renewal. And that comes in the form of my morning routine and my mental approach throughout the day. I’m renewing in the morning and then I’m renewing by disciplining my thoughts throughout the day.



For the past couple of months, I’ve really focused on my making my mornings more effective. I’ve always tried to have a routine in the morning, but last school year at times I wasn’t as diligent. And I could definitely tell a difference.



More recently, I’m making my mornings count, and everything I’m doing seems to be working better. I feel more effective. I have more energy. My relationships are stronger. I’m more patient. More productive. More focused. More determined. I feel stronger overall.



So here’s what I’m doing differently. I don’t do every single one of these things every morning, but I do several of them each day. Being able to pick and choose gives my routine some variety. The routine can take me an hour or more, but there have been mornings I needed to get to school early, and I’ve done an abbreviated version in 10 minutes.



1. Smile



Start the day by finding something to smile about. Choose to smile. Research has shown the physical act of smiling has benefits for stress recovery, improved mood, and creativity. (Time: 30 seconds)



2. Breathe



I’m using a meditation app to work on focused breathing and meditation. There are several smartphone apps available, and I’ve tried a couple of them. Practicing mindfulness is great for increased focus, reduced anxiety, and improved cognition. (Time: 3-5 minutes)

3. Be Grateful



Gratitude is powerful for feeling better, having more energy, and training your brain to look for good things. I follow the advice of author MK Mueller. Be grateful for three things that have happened in the last 24 hours with no repeats ever. It’s great to share your gratitude with someone or journal about it. (Time: 3-5 minutes)



4. Move



This one I’m including every day in my routine. I do something to be physically active each morning. It might be running several miles. Or, it might be a two-minute plank and that’s all. But I’m getting some type of exercise in my routine every morning. (Time: 2 minutes-1 hour)



5. Envision



Almost all great athletes use mental imagery to gain an edge. When you imagine exactly how you want a situation, interaction, event, or performance to go, it creates a mental model for success. It sets the stage for success. I spend a few moments each morning thinking about desired outcomes. I think about these things as if the outcome has already been established, as if they are already true. I think it until I feel it. (Time 2-5 minutes) 



6. Affirm



This practice is similar to envisioning except it is focused on self more than situation. So I’m thinking about characteristics I’m developing in myself as if they are already present at the desired level. I tell myself the things that I value and that I want to become. It helps clarify my values and focuses my growth. (Time 2-5 minutes)



7. Read



Like movement and exercise, I also make reading part of every morning. I keep a list of books to read and have several people in my life who share book suggestions with me. I also try to read blog posts and, of course, Twitter posts from my PLN. I can’t imagine not making reading a habit in my life. The things I continually learn add so much value to who I am and what I am striving to accomplish in life. (Time 15-45 minutes)



8. Reflect



I often think back over recent events during my morning routine. I think about decisions or interactions and what I can learn from them. What’s working? What’s not working? I’m careful not to beat myself up if something didn’t go well. I simply consider what I could do better next time and keep my focus on the future. If I can’t do something to improve myself or the situation, then I’m not going to continue thinking about it. Worry and regret is disempowering. I want to spend my time thinking in empowered ways. (Time 2-5 minutes)



9. Pray



If you’re not a person of faith, you may choose to skip right over this one. I don’t want to push my faith on anyone. I realize a person’s beliefs about God are…well, deeply personal. But I must share this part of my morning, because for me, spending time in prayer is the most valuable part of my daily routine. I have a list of things I pray about each morning. They are things that are very important to me. I must also share that my prayer life often intersects with each of the other parts of my routine. My whole morning routine is basically my focused time with God. So I’m often praying while I’m exercising or reflecting. I want to start my day by meeting with God, so I’m more effective as I meet with people throughout the day. (Time 5-10 minutes)



I realize this seems like a long list of things to do, especially if you don’t like getting up early in the morning. Keep in mind I don’t do all of these every day. And the amount of time I spend on each one varies also. 



If you want to reduce stress, have more energy, and increase your effectiveness, I highly recommend developing your morning routine. How you spend the first hour of your day will have a big impact on how the rest of your day goes. Make it count.



What are some of your morning routines? Are you intentional about daily renewal? What are your thoughts about reducing stress and increasing your effectiveness? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Importance of Daily Renewal for Educators



Teaching is a challenging and exhausting profession. No one can understand what it’s like until you’ve experienced it. You make untold numbers of decisions every day. You work with kids who have all sorts of unique and sometimes unrelenting needs. 



The pressure is real. Sometimes it feels like you’re just treading water and then someone hands you a concrete block. So you better be a great swimmer! Ha.



I hear lots of ideas about educators dealing with stress. You need to make time for yourself. You need to recharge in the summer and on weekends. You need to have a healthy work/life balance. All of those things are probably true.



But for me, the biggest thing that helps me stay positive, productive, and energized is daily renewal. And that comes in the form of my morning routine and my mental approach throughout the day. I’m renewing in the morning and then I’m renewing by disciplining my thoughts throughout the day.



For the past couple of months, I’ve really focused on my making my mornings more effective. I’ve always tried to have a routine in the morning, but last school year at times I wasn’t as diligent. And I could definitely tell a difference.



More recently, I’m making my mornings count, and everything I’m doing seems to be working better. I feel more effective. I have more energy. My relationships are stronger. I’m more patient. More productive. More focused. More determined. I feel stronger overall.



So here’s what I’m doing differently. I don’t do every single one of these things every morning, but I do several of them each day. Being able to pick and choose gives my routine some variety. The routine can take me an hour or more, but there have been mornings I needed to get to school early, and I’ve done an abbreviated version in 10 minutes.



1. Smile



Start the day by finding something to smile about. Choose to smile. Research has shown the physical act of smiling has benefits for stress recovery, improved mood, and creativity. (Time: 30 seconds)



2. Breathe



I’m using a meditation app to work on focused breathing and meditation. There are several smartphone apps available, and I’ve tried a couple of them. Practicing mindfulness is great for increased focus, reduced anxiety, and improved cognition. (Time: 3-5 minutes)

3. Be Grateful



Gratitude is powerful for feeling better, having more energy, and training your brain to look for good things. I follow the advice of author MK Mueller. Be grateful for three things that have happened in the last 24 hours with no repeats ever. It’s great to share your gratitude with someone or journal about it. (Time: 3-5 minutes)



4. Move



This one I’m including every day in my routine. I do something to be physically active each morning. It might be running several miles. Or, it might be a two-minute plank and that’s all. But I’m getting some type of exercise in my routine every morning. (Time: 2 minutes-1 hour)



5. Envision



Almost all great athletes use mental imagery to gain an edge. When you imagine exactly how you want a situation, interaction, event, or performance to go, it creates a mental model for success. It sets the stage for success. I spend a few moments each morning thinking about desired outcomes. I think about these things as if the outcome has already been established, as if they are already true. I think it until I feel it. (Time 2-5 minutes) 



6. Affirm



This practice is similar to envisioning except it is focused on self more than situation. So I’m thinking about characteristics I’m developing in myself as if they are already present at the desired level. I tell myself the things that I value and that I want to become. It helps clarify my values and focuses my growth. (Time 2-5 minutes)



7. Read



Like movement and exercise, I also make reading part of every morning. I keep a list of books to read and have several people in my life who share book suggestions with me. I also try to read blog posts and, of course, Twitter posts from my PLN. I can’t imagine not making reading a habit in my life. The things I continually learn add so much value to who I am and what I am striving to accomplish in life. (Time 15-45 minutes)



8. Reflect



I often think back over recent events during my morning routine. I think about decisions or interactions and what I can learn from them. What’s working? What’s not working? I’m careful not to beat myself up if something didn’t go well. I simply consider what I could do better next time and keep my focus on the future. If I can’t do something to improve myself or the situation, then I’m not going to continue thinking about it. Worry and regret is disempowering. I want to spend my time thinking in empowered ways. (Time 2-5 minutes)



9. Pray



If you’re not a person of faith, you may choose to skip right over this one. I don’t want to push my faith on anyone. I realize a person’s beliefs about God are…well, deeply personal. But I must share this part of my morning, because for me, spending time in prayer is the most valuable part of my daily routine. I have a list of things I pray about each morning. They are things that are very important to me. I must also share that my prayer life often intersects with each of the other parts of my routine. My whole morning routine is basically my focused time with God. So I’m often praying while I’m exercising or reflecting. I want to start my day by meeting with God, so I’m more effective as I meet with people throughout the day. (Time 5-10 minutes)



I realize this seems like a long list of things to do, especially if you don’t like getting up early in the morning. Keep in mind I don’t do all of these every day. And the amount of time I spend on each one varies also. 



If you want to reduce stress, have more energy, and increase your effectiveness, I highly recommend developing your morning routine. How you spend the first hour of your day will have a big impact on how the rest of your day goes. Make it count.



What are some of your morning routines? Are you intentional about daily renewal? What are your thoughts about reducing stress and increasing your effectiveness? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Importance of Daily Renewal for Educators



If you want to learn and grow and make a greater impact, it’s essential to be a productive risk taker. Not all risks are productive of course, but most people actually make too few mistakes, not too many.



Former IBM President Thomas Watson boldly proclaimed, “If you want to succeed, double your rate of failure.” It’s through our mistakes that we learn. When we take risks, we either win or we learn. Not win or lose. Win or learn.



So how do you become a stronger risk taker? How do you find the courage to step out of your comfort zone and into your growth zone? Here are 7 ideas.



1. Allow Yourself to Be Vulnerable



Risk taking involves the possibility of failure. Be content with doing your best even if the outcome isn’t what you hoped for initially. 



2. Take Many, Smaller Risks to Start



If you want to grow as a risk taker, take more risks. But don’t think they have to be gigantic risks at first. In fact, it’s not wise to take larger risks to start. Taking lots of smaller risks helps you gain the confidence, practice, and good judgment to take larger risks eventually.



3. Hang Out with Risk Takers



If you spend your time with people who protect the status quo and simply try to stay comfortable, you’ll be more likely to do the same. Bring people into your life who are taking risks and living their dreams. It’s very difficult to rise above mediocrity if that’s what you are surrounded by every day. Seek excellence. And know that when you take risks, it’s going to make some people very uncomfortable.



4. Do Something a Little Wild and Crazy



There are lots of wild and crazy things you can do that might feel frightening but really aren’t that risky at all. You might risk embarrassment if it doesn’t work out, but that’s about it. Later this year my daughter Maddie and I will be contestants in our community’s Dancing with the Stars fundraiser. So although dancing in front of a big crowd is way out of my comfort zone, what’s the worst that could happen right? It should actually be fun. And I know it’s an opportunity to practice risk taking and just going for it.



5. Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable



It might feel safer to just be content with how things are. It might feel more comfortable to just go through the motions. But if you want to grow, you have to step out of your comfort zone. There is always that little voice telling you to play it safe. You have to push past that resistance. I’ve made it a habit to read and learn and spend time on personal growth at least 5-hours every week. At first, that was very difficult but eventually it became easier. What was uncomfortable as first became comfortable and increasingly valuable over time.



6. Be an Adaptable Learner.



Our world is changing faster than ever. The rate of change is accelerating. And since we’re not teaching kids from 20 years ago, our classrooms and schools shouldn’t look like 20 years ago either. Things are changing so quickly that even schools that are taking risks and making bold moves forward are likely still falling behind. Our students need to see us as adaptable learners. They need to see us model growth, change, and adaptability. 



7. Make No Excuses 



No one want to live an average, ordinary existence. Don’t sacrifice your capacity for excellence by listening to the voice telling you to settle for less. You can live an extraordinary life and have extraordinary impact. You just have to do it. You have to push through your fears and stop making excuses.



What risks are you willing to take this year? How will you push yourself out of your own comfort zone? I’d love to hear your feedback. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 7 Ways to Be a Stronger, More Productive Risk Taker



If you want to learn and grow and make a greater impact, it’s essential to be a productive risk taker. Not all risks are productive of course, but most people actually make too few mistakes, not too many.



Former IBM President Thomas Watson boldly proclaimed, “If you want to succeed, double your rate of failure.” It’s through our mistakes that we learn. When we take risks, we either win or we learn. Not win or lose. Win or learn.



So how do you become a stronger risk taker? How do you find the courage to step out of your comfort zone and into your growth zone? Here are 7 ideas.



1. Allow Yourself to Be Vulnerable



Risk taking involves the possibility of failure. Be content with doing your best even if the outcome isn’t what you hoped for initially. 



2. Take Many, Smaller Risks to Start



If you want to grow as a risk taker, take more risks. But don’t think they have to be gigantic risks at first. In fact, it’s not wise to take larger risks to start. Taking lots of smaller risks helps you gain the confidence, practice, and good judgment to take larger risks eventually.



3. Hang Out with Risk Takers



If you spend your time with people who protect the status quo and simply try to stay comfortable, you’ll be more likely to do the same. Bring people into your life who are taking risks and living their dreams. It’s very difficult to rise above mediocrity if that’s what you are surrounded by every day. Seek excellence. And know that when you take risks, it’s going to make some people very uncomfortable.



4. Do Something a Little Wild and Crazy



There are lots of wild and crazy things you can do that might feel frightening but really aren’t that risky at all. You might risk embarrassment if it doesn’t work out, but that’s about it. Later this year my daughter Maddie and I will be contestants in our community’s Dancing with the Stars fundraiser. So although dancing in front of a big crowd is way out of my comfort zone, what’s the worst that could happen right? It should actually be fun. And I know it’s an opportunity to practice risk taking and just going for it.



5. Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable



It might feel safer to just be content with how things are. It might feel more comfortable to just go through the motions. But if you want to grow, you have to step out of your comfort zone. There is always that little voice telling you to play it safe. You have to push past that resistance. I’ve made it a habit to read and learn and spend time on personal growth at least 5-hours every week. At first, that was very difficult but eventually it became easier. What was uncomfortable as first became comfortable and increasingly valuable over time.



6. Be an Adaptable Learner.



Our world is changing faster than ever. The rate of change is accelerating. And since we’re not teaching kids from 20 years ago, our classrooms and schools shouldn’t look like 20 years ago either. Things are changing so quickly that even schools that are taking risks and making bold moves forward are likely still falling behind. Our students need to see us as adaptable learners. They need to see us model growth, change, and adaptability. 



7. Make No Excuses 



No one want to live an average, ordinary existence. Don’t sacrifice your capacity for excellence by listening to the voice telling you to settle for less. You can live an extraordinary life and have extraordinary impact. You just have to do it. You have to push through your fears and stop making excuses.



What risks are you willing to take this year? How will you push yourself out of your own comfort zone? I’d love to hear your feedback. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 7 Ways to Be a Stronger, More Productive Risk Taker



If you want to learn and grow and make a greater impact, it’s essential to be a productive risk taker. Not all risks are productive of course, but most people actually make too few mistakes, not too many.



Former IBM President Thomas Watson boldly proclaimed, “If you want to succeed, double your rate of failure.” It’s through our mistakes that we learn. When we take risks, we either win or we learn. Not win or lose. Win or learn.



So how do you become a stronger risk taker? How do you find the courage to step out of your comfort zone and into your growth zone? Here are 7 ideas.



1. Allow Yourself to Be Vulnerable



Risk taking involves the possibility of failure. Be content with doing your best even if the outcome isn’t what you hoped for initially. 



2. Take Many, Smaller Risks to Start



If you want to grow as a risk taker, take more risks. But don’t think they have to be gigantic risks at first. In fact, it’s not wise to take larger risks to start. Taking lots of smaller risks helps you gain the confidence, practice, and good judgment to take larger risks eventually.



3. Hang Out with Risk Takers



If you spend your time with people who protect the status quo and simply try to stay comfortable, you’ll be more likely to do the same. Bring people into your life who are taking risks and living their dreams. It’s very difficult to rise above mediocrity if that’s what you are surrounded by every day. Seek excellence. And know that when you take risks, it’s going to make some people very uncomfortable.



4. Do Something a Little Wild and Crazy



There are lots of wild and crazy things you can do that might feel frightening but really aren’t that risky at all. You might risk embarrassment if it doesn’t work out, but that’s about it. Later this year my daughter Maddie and I will be contestants in our community’s Dancing with the Stars fundraiser. So although dancing in front of a big crowd is way out of my comfort zone, what’s the worst that could happen right? It should actually be fun. And I know it’s an opportunity to practice risk taking and just going for it.



5. Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable



It might feel safer to just be content with how things are. It might feel more comfortable to just go through the motions. But if you want to grow, you have to step out of your comfort zone. There is always that little voice telling you to play it safe. You have to push past that resistance. I’ve made it a habit to read and learn and spend time on personal growth at least 5-hours every week. At first, that was very difficult but eventually it became easier. What was uncomfortable as first became comfortable and increasingly valuable over time.



6. Be an Adaptable Learner.



Our world is changing faster than ever. The rate of change is accelerating. And since we’re not teaching kids from 20 years ago, our classrooms and schools shouldn’t look like 20 years ago either. Things are changing so quickly that even schools that are taking risks and making bold moves forward are likely still falling behind. Our students need to see us as adaptable learners. They need to see us model growth, change, and adaptability. 



7. Make No Excuses 



No one want to live an average, ordinary existence. Don’t sacrifice your capacity for excellence by listening to the voice telling you to settle for less. You can live an extraordinary life and have extraordinary impact. You just have to do it. You have to push through your fears and stop making excuses.



What risks are you willing to take this year? How will you push yourself out of your own comfort zone? I’d love to hear your feedback. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 7 Ways to Be a Stronger, More Productive Risk Taker



If you want to learn and grow and make a greater impact, it’s essential to be a productive risk taker. Not all risks are productive of course, but most people actually make too few mistakes, not too many.



Former IBM President Thomas Watson boldly proclaimed, “If you want to succeed, double your rate of failure.” It’s through our mistakes that we learn. When we take risks, we either win or we learn. Not win or lose. Win or learn.



So how do you become a stronger risk taker? How do you find the courage to step out of your comfort zone and into your growth zone? Here are 7 ideas.



1. Allow Yourself to Be Vulnerable



Risk taking involves the possibility of failure. Be content with doing your best even if the outcome isn’t what you hoped for initially. 



2. Take Many, Smaller Risks to Start



If you want to grow as a risk taker, take more risks. But don’t think they have to be gigantic risks at first. In fact, it’s not wise to take larger risks to start. Taking lots of smaller risks helps you gain the confidence, practice, and good judgment to take larger risks eventually.



3. Hang Out with Risk Takers



If you spend your time with people who protect the status quo and simply try to stay comfortable, you’ll be more likely to do the same. Bring people into your life who are taking risks and living their dreams. It’s very difficult to rise above mediocrity if that’s what you are surrounded by every day. Seek excellence. And know that when you take risks, it’s going to make some people very uncomfortable.



4. Do Something a Little Wild and Crazy



There are lots of wild and crazy things you can do that might feel frightening but really aren’t that risky at all. You might risk embarrassment if it doesn’t work out, but that’s about it. Later this year my daughter Maddie and I will be contestants in our community’s Dancing with the Stars fundraiser. So although dancing in front of a big crowd is way out of my comfort zone, what’s the worst that could happen right? It should actually be fun. And I know it’s an opportunity to practice risk taking and just going for it.



5. Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable



It might feel safer to just be content with how things are. It might feel more comfortable to just go through the motions. But if you want to grow, you have to step out of your comfort zone. There is always that little voice telling you to play it safe. You have to push past that resistance. I’ve made it a habit to read and learn and spend time on personal growth at least 5-hours every week. At first, that was very difficult but eventually it became easier. What was uncomfortable as first became comfortable and increasingly valuable over time.



6. Be an Adaptable Learner.



Our world is changing faster than ever. The rate of change is accelerating. And since we’re not teaching kids from 20 years ago, our classrooms and schools shouldn’t look like 20 years ago either. Things are changing so quickly that even schools that are taking risks and making bold moves forward are likely still falling behind. Our students need to see us as adaptable learners. They need to see us model growth, change, and adaptability. 



7. Make No Excuses 



No one want to live an average, ordinary existence. Don’t sacrifice your capacity for excellence by listening to the voice telling you to settle for less. You can live an extraordinary life and have extraordinary impact. You just have to do it. You have to push through your fears and stop making excuses.



What risks are you willing to take this year? How will you push yourself out of your own comfort zone? I’d love to hear your feedback. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 7 Ways to Be a Stronger, More Productive Risk Taker



When you think about your students, what stories are you telling yourself about them? I’ve been guilty of buying into limiting stories about who they are, where they come from, or what they’re capable of.



Of course, I care about all of our kids and strive to treat them all with dignity and respect. But it’s easy to see them a certain way if I’m not careful. It’s easy to make judgments. There are subtle thoughts and feelings. I might believe a story that casts some as most likely to succeed and others as at-risk or some other label.



It’s almost effortless to impose our stories on them or accept the limiting stories others believe about them without a question.



They don’t have a chance.



They’re victims of their environment.



They don’t have the right parents, the right influences, the right resources. 



They have an IEP. 



They’re low functioning.



They’re a behavior problem.



They’re lazy.



They don’t care about school.



They’ll never make it in college.



We can easily make all kinds of assumptions even without thinking. 

I’ve seen on Twitter recently the idea that we shouldn’t judge a student by the chapter of their story we walk in on. That is a powerful thought. So true! We all know people who’ve had difficult back stories who were probably judged as incapable or unlikely to succeed.



And yet, they made it.



Some famous examples include Albert Einstein, Oprah Winfrey, J.K. Rowling, Walt Disney, Abraham Lincoln and many others. Not only did they make, they became world changers.



I’m gonna try harder to never tell myself a story about a kid that says they can’t because of where they live, what kind of home they come from, the trauma they’ve experienced, or anything else that limits their possibilities.



Things that have been true in the past don’t have to be true for the future. Alan Cohen writes “our history is not our destiny.”



As educators, we cannot buy into the idea that because a kid comes from the wrong side of the tracks, lacks resources, or has a difficult home environment they have limited capacity.



As I wrote in Future Driven

Treat all of your students like future world changers. I know there are some who are difficult, disrespectful, and disengaged. But don’t let that place limits on what they might accomplish someday. Believe in their possibilities and build on their strengths.

Kids can overcome any obstacle placed in their way. Don’t believe it? How can you know what might be possible with effort, enthusiasm, and continuous learning? 



And when no one else in the world is seeing a kid for the genius of what’s inside them, it’s time for educators to step up and be the ones who find that spark. 



No limits. No excuses.



What story are you telling yourself? What story are you believing about yourself? What story are you believing about your students?



The culture on the inside of your school must be stronger than the culture on the outside. There are so many outside voices telling kids what they can’t do, and it’s no wonder that kids start to believe it.



Every school needs every adult who works there to believe in the possibilities of their students, who will push them to greatness every day, who show them how to reach higher and go further. They may have limits crashing down on them from the external realities they live with, but we can help unleash the greatness they have within them. We can help them overcome and break through the limits.



What are specific ways we can help students realize they have greatness within? How can we unleash the potential they have to pursue their unlimited capacity? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More What Story Are You Telling Yourself?



When you think about your students, what stories are you telling yourself about them? I’ve been guilty of buying into limiting stories about who they are, where they come from, or what they’re capable of.



Of course, I care about all of our kids and strive to treat them all with dignity and respect. But it’s easy to see them a certain way if I’m not careful. It’s easy to make judgments. There are subtle thoughts and feelings. I might believe a story that casts some as most likely to succeed and others as at-risk or some other label.



It’s almost effortless to impose our stories on them or accept the limiting stories others believe about them without a question.



They don’t have a chance.



They’re victims of their environment.



They don’t have the right parents, the right influences, the right resources. 



They have an IEP. 



They’re low functioning.



They’re a behavior problem.



They’re lazy.



They don’t care about school.



They’ll never make it in college.



We can easily make all kinds of assumptions even without thinking. 

I’ve seen on Twitter recently the idea that we shouldn’t judge a student by the chapter of their story we walk in on. That is a powerful thought. So true! We all know people who’ve had difficult back stories who were probably judged as incapable or unlikely to succeed.



And yet, they made it.



Some famous examples include Albert Einstein, Oprah Winfrey, J.K. Rowling, Walt Disney, Abraham Lincoln and many others. Not only did they make, they became world changers.



I’m gonna try harder to never tell myself a story about a kid that says they can’t because of where they live, what kind of home they come from, the trauma they’ve experienced, or anything else that limits their possibilities.



Things that have been true in the past don’t have to be true for the future. Alan Cohen writes “our history is not our destiny.”



As educators, we cannot buy into the idea that because a kid comes from the wrong side of the tracks, lacks resources, or has a difficult home environment they have limited capacity.



As I wrote in Future Driven

Treat all of your students like future world changers. I know there are some who are difficult, disrespectful, and disengaged. But don’t let that place limits on what they might accomplish someday. Believe in their possibilities and build on their strengths.

Kids can overcome any obstacle placed in their way. Don’t believe it? How can you know what might be possible with effort, enthusiasm, and continuous learning? 



And when no one else in the world is seeing a kid for the genius of what’s inside them, it’s time for educators to step up and be the ones who find that spark. 



No limits. No excuses.



What story are you telling yourself? What story are you believing about yourself? What story are you believing about your students?



The culture on the inside of your school must be stronger than the culture on the outside. There are so many outside voices telling kids what they can’t do, and it’s no wonder that kids start to believe it.



Every school needs every adult who works there to believe in the possibilities of their students, who will push them to greatness every day, who show them how to reach higher and go further. They may have limits crashing down on them from the external realities they live with, but we can help unleash the greatness they have within them. We can help them overcome and break through the limits.



What are specific ways we can help students realize they have greatness within? How can we unleash the potential they have to pursue their unlimited capacity? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More What Story Are You Telling Yourself?



When you think about your students, what stories are you telling yourself about them? I’ve been guilty of buying into limiting stories about who they are, where they come from, or what they’re capable of.



Of course, I care about all of our kids and strive to treat them all with dignity and respect. But it’s easy to see them a certain way if I’m not careful. It’s easy to make judgments. There are subtle thoughts and feelings. I might believe a story that casts some as most likely to succeed and others as at-risk or some other label.



It’s almost effortless to impose our stories on them or accept the limiting stories others believe about them without a question.



They don’t have a chance.



They’re victims of their environment.



They don’t have the right parents, the right influences, the right resources. 



They have an IEP. 



They’re low functioning.



They’re a behavior problem.



They’re lazy.



They don’t care about school.



They’ll never make it in college.



We can easily make all kinds of assumptions even without thinking. 

I’ve seen on Twitter recently the idea that we shouldn’t judge a student by the chapter of their story we walk in on. That is a powerful thought. So true! We all know people who’ve had difficult back stories who were probably judged as incapable or unlikely to succeed.



And yet, they made it.



Some famous examples include Albert Einstein, Oprah Winfrey, J.K. Rowling, Walt Disney, Abraham Lincoln and many others. Not only did they make, they became world changers.



I’m gonna try harder to never tell myself a story about a kid that says they can’t because of where they live, what kind of home they come from, the trauma they’ve experienced, or anything else that limits their possibilities.



Things that have been true in the past don’t have to be true for the future. Alan Cohen writes “our history is not our destiny.”



As educators, we cannot buy into the idea that because a kid comes from the wrong side of the tracks, lacks resources, or has a difficult home environment they have limited capacity.



As I wrote in Future Driven

Treat all of your students like future world changers. I know there are some who are difficult, disrespectful, and disengaged. But don’t let that place limits on what they might accomplish someday. Believe in their possibilities and build on their strengths.

Kids can overcome any obstacle placed in their way. Don’t believe it? How can you know what might be possible with effort, enthusiasm, and continuous learning? 



And when no one else in the world is seeing a kid for the genius of what’s inside them, it’s time for educators to step up and be the ones who find that spark. 



No limits. No excuses.



What story are you telling yourself? What story are you believing about yourself? What story are you believing about your students?



The culture on the inside of your school must be stronger than the culture on the outside. There are so many outside voices telling kids what they can’t do, and it’s no wonder that kids start to believe it.



Every school needs every adult who works there to believe in the possibilities of their students, who will push them to greatness every day, who show them how to reach higher and go further. They may have limits crashing down on them from the external realities they live with, but we can help unleash the greatness they have within them. We can help them overcome and break through the limits.



What are specific ways we can help students realize they have greatness within? How can we unleash the potential they have to pursue their unlimited capacity? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

      

Read More What Story Are You Telling Yourself?



When you think about your students, what stories are you telling yourself about them? I’ve been guilty of buying into limiting stories about who they are, where they come from, or what they’re capable of.



Of course, I care about all of our kids and strive to treat them all with dignity and respect. But it’s easy to see them a certain way if I’m not careful. It’s easy to make judgments. There are subtle thoughts and feelings. I might believe a story that casts some as most likely to succeed and others as at-risk or some other label.



It’s almost effortless to impose our stories on them or accept the limiting stories others believe about them without a question.



They don’t have a chance.



They’re victims of their environment.



They don’t have the right parents, the right influences, the right resources. 



They have an IEP. 



They’re low functioning.



They’re a behavior problem.



They’re lazy.



They don’t care about school.



They’ll never make it in college.



We can easily make all kinds of assumptions even without thinking. 

I’ve seen on Twitter recently the idea that we shouldn’t judge a student by the chapter of their story we walk in on. That is a powerful thought. So true! We all know people who’ve had difficult back stories who were probably judged as incapable or unlikely to succeed.



And yet, they made it.



Some famous examples include Albert Einstein, Oprah Winfrey, J.K. Rowling, Walt Disney, Abraham Lincoln and many others. Not only did they make, they became world changers.



I’m gonna try harder to never tell myself a story about a kid that says they can’t because of where they live, what kind of home they come from, the trauma they’ve experienced, or anything else that limits their possibilities.



Things that have been true in the past don’t have to be true for the future. Alan Cohen writes “our history is not our destiny.”



As educators, we cannot buy into the idea that because a kid comes from the wrong side of the tracks, lacks resources, or has a difficult home environment they have limited capacity.



As I wrote in Future Driven

Treat all of your students like future world changers. I know there are some who are difficult, disrespectful, and disengaged. But don’t let that place limits on what they might accomplish someday. Believe in their possibilities and build on their strengths.

Kids can overcome any obstacle placed in their way. Don’t believe it? How can you know what might be possible with effort, enthusiasm, and continuous learning? 



And when no one else in the world is seeing a kid for the genius of what’s inside them, it’s time for educators to step up and be the ones who find that spark. 



No limits. No excuses.



What story are you telling yourself? What story are you believing about yourself? What story are you believing about your students?



The culture on the inside of your school must be stronger than the culture on the outside. There are so many outside voices telling kids what they can’t do, and it’s no wonder that kids start to believe it.



Every school needs every adult who works there to believe in the possibilities of their students, who will push them to greatness every day, who show them how to reach higher and go further. They may have limits crashing down on them from the external realities they live with, but we can help unleash the greatness they have within them. We can help them overcome and break through the limits.



What are specific ways we can help students realize they have greatness within? How can we unleash the potential they have to pursue their unlimited capacity? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

      

Read More What Story Are You Telling Yourself?