Tag: perseverance

It’s been said the only certainties in life are death and taxes.

Let’s add one to the list. We can be certain there will be problems. As long as we are in this life, there is a 100% guarantee there will be problems.
We all face challenges every…

Read More Problems Usually Seem Worse Than They Are

In this instant everything world we live in, it seems like life is moving faster than ever. It’s a text, tweet, Tic-Tok world for our kids and the idea of staying with anything for very long seems very old school. And that’s a common concern I hear from teachers. It’s extremely difficult to have a successful learning environment without learners who can persist in learning.



Perseverance matters for learning and life, and educators must be intentional about helping students develop this trait. But how can we do that most effectively?



This past summer I was blessed to be part of Education Write Now Volume III, a collaborative writing project for educators sponsored by Routledge publishing. The team gathered in Boston for this effort and produced the book in just over 48 hours!



This year’s volume, set to be released in December, will feature solutions to common challenges in your classroom or school. Each chapter will address a different challenge.



While the book promises to be a great resource for overcoming education challenges, the proceeds for the book also support a great cause seeking to overcome one of the most pressing challenges imaginable, teen suicide. The Will to Live Foundation supports teen mental health projects and is doing great work in that area.






For my chapter, I shared some thoughts on developing perseverance in students. How can we respond when students show apathy? What are strategies for nurturing grit and growth mindset? How can we ask better questions to encourage honest reflection and self-awareness in students? Those are a few questions I tried to explore.



One thing is for certain, our students are not going to reach their potential or make the most of academic opportunities unless they have an orientation toward working hard and persevering when faced with difficulties. There is great power in perseverance.



Here’s an excerpt from my chapter:




As educators, we must plan for teaching students about perseverance just like we would plan for teaching subject matter content. Developing perseverance in students is just as important as learning any academic content and will support the learning of academic content. I believe the investment in educating kids about productive failure will result in increased learning across the board. As a building leader, I also want to support this work and take every opportunity to recognize and celebrate perseverance in our school.




We can all probably agree that perseverance is important and that it’s valuable for kids to develop these skills, but we have to be intentional about creating the structures and systems that support the development of perseverance. We can think it’s important, but what are doing to act like it’s important? Intentions without actions aren’t going to result in any progress.



As you’re planning for your classroom or school environment, are you being intentional about character and leadership development? Are you teaching students how to persevere? 



When we see students struggling with an essential life skill, one that’s keeping them from academic success, I believe we should be just as intentional about teaching these skills as we are about teaching academic standards. It was an honor for me to share several specific strategies that might prove helpful in #EdWriteNow Vol. III.



So what’s it like to write a book in 48 hours? Exhausting? Yes! Exhilarating? Yes! But when you’ve got a great team to help you through…it’s an amazing experience. It’s an experience I’ll never forget.




What are some of your thoughts on teaching skills like perseverance? Do you feel this is a significant challenge in your classroom? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Power of Perseverance

Is it more professional to teach in a traditional manner, the way you remember your teachers teaching you? 



Or, is it more professional to teach in innovative ways that might be more relevant to today’s world with today’s students? 



Is being professional dressing a certain way, fulfilling your obligations consistently, or having a certain type of professional demeanor?



Maybe some of those things matter for professionalism. But what matters most?



What exactly does it mean to be professional?



It seems to me that being a professional is doing things in the best possible way to meet professional goals. If the ultimate goal is the best possible learning for students, then being professional isn’t about doing it like it’s always been done, or doing it the way you prefer, or doing it by some personal code that might communicate professionalism for the sake of professionalism.



What’s most relevant for being a professional educator is taking actions and designing learning in a way that works best for the learners you are currently teaching, this group of kids, the ones you are working with right now.



Being a professional is understanding the needs of the students. It’s seeing things from the perspective of the learner, and then seeking to meet their needs to create the strongest learning environment possible. It’s being curious about how your students are experiencing learning. And it’s having enough empathy to understand and adjust.



What’s your professional identity?



It’s only natural to teach in the way that’s most comfortable for you. I think most people have a teaching identity that says, “I’m the type of person who teaches such and such way.” I’ve even heard teachers make comments like, “That just doesn’t work for me.” 



They have a certain idea of their teaching identity. And then they build a story for why their students need the type of teacher they value, the type of teacher that fits their identity.



I’m the strict teacher. These kids need discipline.



I’m the lecturing teacher. These kids need to learn to take notes for college.



I’m the cool teacher. These kids need me to be their friend.



I’m the old school teacher. These kids need to value the things my generation valued.



I’m the dominion teacher. These kids need to fall into line and comply with authority.



But what if your teaching identity isn’t really what your students need? Are you willing to reinvent yourself to do what’s best for today’s learners? All of them?



Being professional means doing beneficial things that aren’t necessarily your natural inclination.



To me, that’s being a professional. It’s creating a classroom environment that will engage and ensure maximum learning even if that’s not what’s most comfortable for me. I’m going to step out of my comfort zone to make this better for my students.



The most professional educators (teachers, administrators, and other roles too) I know are the ones who are willing to do just about anything to make learning better for students. They are willing to adjust their practices to meet the needs of the students. 



In fact, they are actively seeking ways to adjust their practices to meet the legitimate learning needs of their students.



Well, I’m not here to entertain. I’m not doing a dog and pony show.



Is making learning come alive a dog and pony show? Is cultivating curiosity being an entertainer? 



The kids need to learn grit. They need to learn to do the work, even if they think it’s boring. They need to learn perseverance.



Grit and perseverance are connected to things we find meaningful, relevant, and purposeful. Do students find your class meaningful, relevant, and purposeful?



I bet you apply effort to things you find meaningful. In fact, every action you’re motivated to take is because you attach some meaning to it. You might even hate doing it. But you attach some meaning to it. Or you wouldn’t do it.



What about your students? What are you doing to make learning more meaningful for your students? If they aren’t motivated, it’s because they don’t see the meaning in what you’re asking them to do. At least they don’t see enough meaning in it, yet, because when they do, they will engage.



What adjustments are you making?



A professional educator is seeking to make learning irresistible. 



A professional educator is seeking to meet the legitimate learning needs of the students.



A professional educator is willing to set aside personal preferences for peak practices.



A professional educator is enthusiastic, excited, and energetic about learners and learning.



A professional educator isn’t satisfied with going through the motions or arriving at good enough. There is a desire for continuous improvement that starts with the person in the mirror. What are the actions, attitudes, and approaches I need to take to succeed with these students?



What do you think about this riff on professionalism? Does it resonate with you? Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. I look forward to reading your comments.

Read More What’s More Professional?



Last Christmas, we decided to add a new Boston Terrier puppy to our family. His name is Rudy. There have been many times over the past months that Rudy has tested our patience. And he’s tested the patience of our older Boston Terrier, Max, too.



He’s chewed up the house. He’s been slow to house train. He’s been quick to disobey. He’s a little too affectionate. He’s in your face affectionate. It’s cute and annoying at the same time.



But a few months ago we noticed something was wrong with Rudy. He was having problems with one of his back legs. It would happen occasionally, and he would limp around on three legs for a while, and then he was back to his old self.



But the problem became even more frequent. A trip to the vet revealed Rudy’s leg problem was Patellar Luxation, a knee cap that was dislocating. The leg would not get better on its own and needed to be addressed surgically.



So Rudy was scheduled for his operation.



After Rudy had his surgery, the vet said we needed to keep him from using the repaired knee. “No using that leg,” he said. 



Just how are you supposed to keep a dog from using a leg? Hey Rudy, no using that leg, okay? 



But turns out that wasn’t a problem. Rudy didn’t want to use the leg. I guess it was pretty sore, and he quit using it entirely after the surgery. 



Even weeks later, after several visits to the vet, Rudy was still not using the repaired leg. The vet suggested several ideas for getting him to start using the leg again, including swim therapy in our bath tub. Seriously.



But Rudy still refused to use his fourth leg. He was a three-legged dog, it seemed, forever.



However, it was clear from our trips to the veterinarian, Rudy’s leg had healed properly. He was simply choosing not to use the leg. He had created a limitation in his canine brain that he was a three-legged dog. He had created a new identity that kept him from reaching his full capacity.



Would Rudy ever walk on four legs again?



And then, in a matter of a couple of weeks, Rudy started testing the fourth leg a little more. He pushed out of his comfort zone and into his growth zone. The video clips below were shot on the same day in the span of about an hour. You’ll see his three legged routine and then what’s possible when he pushes past the limits. Rudy was very capable it seems.






When Rudy got past his limits, he was running around like any puppy should. He was back to annoying all of us again, in his regular way. He was starting to utilize his fourth leg to its full capacity.



But here’s the thing, how many of us are choosing, perhaps unintentionally, to be three-legged dogs? Could it be that most of us are only using a fraction of our true capacity? What might be possible if we would only test our limits and continue to learn and grow?



I think most people are only operating at a small percentage of full capacity. And I think most schools are only operating at a small percentage of full capacity. We’re probably capable of so much more. Our schools are probably capable of so much more.



Sure, we’re trying to make progress, but we’re walking on three legs. We’re trying to make things better, but we need to make ourselves better. Change you first.



What we really need is to cut loose and run on all four legs. And we need to create conditions where other people are able to reach their capacity, too. 



So how can you reach your capacity? You have to get started on a path of growth. Break through your limits with the following…



1. The BELIEF that you need to get better.



If you think you’re doing just fine on three legs, you’ll never find your true capacity. You’ll just keep limping along. You need a vision of what’s possible. Moreover, you also need the belief that things CAN get better. Don’t allow your past performance to limit your future possibilities.



2. The DESIRE to want to get better.



Growth is the more difficult choice. It’s easier just to be satisfied, either intentionally or unintentionally, with how things are. We have to crush apathy and reject mediocrity. We have to desire excellence. You have to commit. You have to really want it.



3. The WILLINGNESS to take action to get better.



You have to test your limits. You have to see what that fourth leg is capable of doing. Sometimes it feels really risky to step out in faith. It might hurt. But you must take action. Destiny is about decisions. It might be hard, but it’s worth it. 



4. The WISDOM to learn how to get better.



There is a certain wisdom and humility needed to recognize that we’re not currently all we could be. We’re probably capable of more, if we’re honest about it. We must therefore seek out opportunities to learn from others. We must apply the things we learn. We have to pursue growth intentionally. 



5. The DISCIPLINE to follow through and be GREAT.



Living a no limits life requires discipline. A new direction requires discipline. Full capacity requires discipline. You have to eliminate the choices that aren’t leading you toward your capacity. You have to be relentless to achieve the results.



What are some ways you want to test your limits? What are some ways you need to test your limits? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter

Read More Are You Reaching Your Full Capacity?



If you want to learn and grow and make a greater impact, it’s essential to be a productive risk taker. Not all risks are productive of course, but most people actually make too few mistakes, not too many.



Former IBM President Thomas Watson boldly proclaimed, “If you want to succeed, double your rate of failure.” It’s through our mistakes that we learn. When we take risks, we either win or we learn. Not win or lose. Win or learn.



So how do you become a stronger risk taker? How do you find the courage to step out of your comfort zone and into your growth zone? Here are 7 ideas.



1. Allow Yourself to Be Vulnerable



Risk taking involves the possibility of failure. Be content with doing your best even if the outcome isn’t what you hoped for initially. 



2. Take Many, Smaller Risks to Start



If you want to grow as a risk taker, take more risks. But don’t think they have to be gigantic risks at first. In fact, it’s not wise to take larger risks to start. Taking lots of smaller risks helps you gain the confidence, practice, and good judgment to take larger risks eventually.



3. Hang Out with Risk Takers



If you spend your time with people who protect the status quo and simply try to stay comfortable, you’ll be more likely to do the same. Bring people into your life who are taking risks and living their dreams. It’s very difficult to rise above mediocrity if that’s what you are surrounded by every day. Seek excellence. And know that when you take risks, it’s going to make some people very uncomfortable.



4. Do Something a Little Wild and Crazy



There are lots of wild and crazy things you can do that might feel frightening but really aren’t that risky at all. You might risk embarrassment if it doesn’t work out, but that’s about it. Later this year my daughter Maddie and I will be contestants in our community’s Dancing with the Stars fundraiser. So although dancing in front of a big crowd is way out of my comfort zone, what’s the worst that could happen right? It should actually be fun. And I know it’s an opportunity to practice risk taking and just going for it.



5. Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable



It might feel safer to just be content with how things are. It might feel more comfortable to just go through the motions. But if you want to grow, you have to step out of your comfort zone. There is always that little voice telling you to play it safe. You have to push past that resistance. I’ve made it a habit to read and learn and spend time on personal growth at least 5-hours every week. At first, that was very difficult but eventually it became easier. What was uncomfortable as first became comfortable and increasingly valuable over time.



6. Be an Adaptable Learner.



Our world is changing faster than ever. The rate of change is accelerating. And since we’re not teaching kids from 20 years ago, our classrooms and schools shouldn’t look like 20 years ago either. Things are changing so quickly that even schools that are taking risks and making bold moves forward are likely still falling behind. Our students need to see us as adaptable learners. They need to see us model growth, change, and adaptability. 



7. Make No Excuses 



No one want to live an average, ordinary existence. Don’t sacrifice your capacity for excellence by listening to the voice telling you to settle for less. You can live an extraordinary life and have extraordinary impact. You just have to do it. You have to push through your fears and stop making excuses.



What risks are you willing to take this year? How will you push yourself out of your own comfort zone? I’d love to hear your feedback. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 7 Ways to Be a Stronger, More Productive Risk Taker



If you want to learn and grow and make a greater impact, it’s essential to be a productive risk taker. Not all risks are productive of course, but most people actually make too few mistakes, not too many.



Former IBM President Thomas Watson boldly proclaimed, “If you want to succeed, double your rate of failure.” It’s through our mistakes that we learn. When we take risks, we either win or we learn. Not win or lose. Win or learn.



So how do you become a stronger risk taker? How do you find the courage to step out of your comfort zone and into your growth zone? Here are 7 ideas.



1. Allow Yourself to Be Vulnerable



Risk taking involves the possibility of failure. Be content with doing your best even if the outcome isn’t what you hoped for initially. 



2. Take Many, Smaller Risks to Start



If you want to grow as a risk taker, take more risks. But don’t think they have to be gigantic risks at first. In fact, it’s not wise to take larger risks to start. Taking lots of smaller risks helps you gain the confidence, practice, and good judgment to take larger risks eventually.



3. Hang Out with Risk Takers



If you spend your time with people who protect the status quo and simply try to stay comfortable, you’ll be more likely to do the same. Bring people into your life who are taking risks and living their dreams. It’s very difficult to rise above mediocrity if that’s what you are surrounded by every day. Seek excellence. And know that when you take risks, it’s going to make some people very uncomfortable.



4. Do Something a Little Wild and Crazy



There are lots of wild and crazy things you can do that might feel frightening but really aren’t that risky at all. You might risk embarrassment if it doesn’t work out, but that’s about it. Later this year my daughter Maddie and I will be contestants in our community’s Dancing with the Stars fundraiser. So although dancing in front of a big crowd is way out of my comfort zone, what’s the worst that could happen right? It should actually be fun. And I know it’s an opportunity to practice risk taking and just going for it.



5. Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable



It might feel safer to just be content with how things are. It might feel more comfortable to just go through the motions. But if you want to grow, you have to step out of your comfort zone. There is always that little voice telling you to play it safe. You have to push past that resistance. I’ve made it a habit to read and learn and spend time on personal growth at least 5-hours every week. At first, that was very difficult but eventually it became easier. What was uncomfortable as first became comfortable and increasingly valuable over time.



6. Be an Adaptable Learner.



Our world is changing faster than ever. The rate of change is accelerating. And since we’re not teaching kids from 20 years ago, our classrooms and schools shouldn’t look like 20 years ago either. Things are changing so quickly that even schools that are taking risks and making bold moves forward are likely still falling behind. Our students need to see us as adaptable learners. They need to see us model growth, change, and adaptability. 



7. Make No Excuses 



No one want to live an average, ordinary existence. Don’t sacrifice your capacity for excellence by listening to the voice telling you to settle for less. You can live an extraordinary life and have extraordinary impact. You just have to do it. You have to push through your fears and stop making excuses.



What risks are you willing to take this year? How will you push yourself out of your own comfort zone? I’d love to hear your feedback. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 7 Ways to Be a Stronger, More Productive Risk Taker



If you want to learn and grow and make a greater impact, it’s essential to be a productive risk taker. Not all risks are productive of course, but most people actually make too few mistakes, not too many.



Former IBM President Thomas Watson boldly proclaimed, “If you want to succeed, double your rate of failure.” It’s through our mistakes that we learn. When we take risks, we either win or we learn. Not win or lose. Win or learn.



So how do you become a stronger risk taker? How do you find the courage to step out of your comfort zone and into your growth zone? Here are 7 ideas.



1. Allow Yourself to Be Vulnerable



Risk taking involves the possibility of failure. Be content with doing your best even if the outcome isn’t what you hoped for initially. 



2. Take Many, Smaller Risks to Start



If you want to grow as a risk taker, take more risks. But don’t think they have to be gigantic risks at first. In fact, it’s not wise to take larger risks to start. Taking lots of smaller risks helps you gain the confidence, practice, and good judgment to take larger risks eventually.



3. Hang Out with Risk Takers



If you spend your time with people who protect the status quo and simply try to stay comfortable, you’ll be more likely to do the same. Bring people into your life who are taking risks and living their dreams. It’s very difficult to rise above mediocrity if that’s what you are surrounded by every day. Seek excellence. And know that when you take risks, it’s going to make some people very uncomfortable.



4. Do Something a Little Wild and Crazy



There are lots of wild and crazy things you can do that might feel frightening but really aren’t that risky at all. You might risk embarrassment if it doesn’t work out, but that’s about it. Later this year my daughter Maddie and I will be contestants in our community’s Dancing with the Stars fundraiser. So although dancing in front of a big crowd is way out of my comfort zone, what’s the worst that could happen right? It should actually be fun. And I know it’s an opportunity to practice risk taking and just going for it.



5. Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable



It might feel safer to just be content with how things are. It might feel more comfortable to just go through the motions. But if you want to grow, you have to step out of your comfort zone. There is always that little voice telling you to play it safe. You have to push past that resistance. I’ve made it a habit to read and learn and spend time on personal growth at least 5-hours every week. At first, that was very difficult but eventually it became easier. What was uncomfortable as first became comfortable and increasingly valuable over time.



6. Be an Adaptable Learner.



Our world is changing faster than ever. The rate of change is accelerating. And since we’re not teaching kids from 20 years ago, our classrooms and schools shouldn’t look like 20 years ago either. Things are changing so quickly that even schools that are taking risks and making bold moves forward are likely still falling behind. Our students need to see us as adaptable learners. They need to see us model growth, change, and adaptability. 



7. Make No Excuses 



No one want to live an average, ordinary existence. Don’t sacrifice your capacity for excellence by listening to the voice telling you to settle for less. You can live an extraordinary life and have extraordinary impact. You just have to do it. You have to push through your fears and stop making excuses.



What risks are you willing to take this year? How will you push yourself out of your own comfort zone? I’d love to hear your feedback. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 7 Ways to Be a Stronger, More Productive Risk Taker



If you want to learn and grow and make a greater impact, it’s essential to be a productive risk taker. Not all risks are productive of course, but most people actually make too few mistakes, not too many.



Former IBM President Thomas Watson boldly proclaimed, “If you want to succeed, double your rate of failure.” It’s through our mistakes that we learn. When we take risks, we either win or we learn. Not win or lose. Win or learn.



So how do you become a stronger risk taker? How do you find the courage to step out of your comfort zone and into your growth zone? Here are 7 ideas.



1. Allow Yourself to Be Vulnerable



Risk taking involves the possibility of failure. Be content with doing your best even if the outcome isn’t what you hoped for initially. 



2. Take Many, Smaller Risks to Start



If you want to grow as a risk taker, take more risks. But don’t think they have to be gigantic risks at first. In fact, it’s not wise to take larger risks to start. Taking lots of smaller risks helps you gain the confidence, practice, and good judgment to take larger risks eventually.



3. Hang Out with Risk Takers



If you spend your time with people who protect the status quo and simply try to stay comfortable, you’ll be more likely to do the same. Bring people into your life who are taking risks and living their dreams. It’s very difficult to rise above mediocrity if that’s what you are surrounded by every day. Seek excellence. And know that when you take risks, it’s going to make some people very uncomfortable.



4. Do Something a Little Wild and Crazy



There are lots of wild and crazy things you can do that might feel frightening but really aren’t that risky at all. You might risk embarrassment if it doesn’t work out, but that’s about it. Later this year my daughter Maddie and I will be contestants in our community’s Dancing with the Stars fundraiser. So although dancing in front of a big crowd is way out of my comfort zone, what’s the worst that could happen right? It should actually be fun. And I know it’s an opportunity to practice risk taking and just going for it.



5. Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable



It might feel safer to just be content with how things are. It might feel more comfortable to just go through the motions. But if you want to grow, you have to step out of your comfort zone. There is always that little voice telling you to play it safe. You have to push past that resistance. I’ve made it a habit to read and learn and spend time on personal growth at least 5-hours every week. At first, that was very difficult but eventually it became easier. What was uncomfortable as first became comfortable and increasingly valuable over time.



6. Be an Adaptable Learner.



Our world is changing faster than ever. The rate of change is accelerating. And since we’re not teaching kids from 20 years ago, our classrooms and schools shouldn’t look like 20 years ago either. Things are changing so quickly that even schools that are taking risks and making bold moves forward are likely still falling behind. Our students need to see us as adaptable learners. They need to see us model growth, change, and adaptability. 



7. Make No Excuses 



No one want to live an average, ordinary existence. Don’t sacrifice your capacity for excellence by listening to the voice telling you to settle for less. You can live an extraordinary life and have extraordinary impact. You just have to do it. You have to push through your fears and stop making excuses.



What risks are you willing to take this year? How will you push yourself out of your own comfort zone? I’d love to hear your feedback. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 7 Ways to Be a Stronger, More Productive Risk Taker



When you think about your students, what stories are you telling yourself about them? I’ve been guilty of buying into limiting stories about who they are, where they come from, or what they’re capable of.



Of course, I care about all of our kids and strive to treat them all with dignity and respect. But it’s easy to see them a certain way if I’m not careful. It’s easy to make judgments. There are subtle thoughts and feelings. I might believe a story that casts some as most likely to succeed and others as at-risk or some other label.



It’s almost effortless to impose our stories on them or accept the limiting stories others believe about them without a question.



They don’t have a chance.



They’re victims of their environment.



They don’t have the right parents, the right influences, the right resources. 



They have an IEP. 



They’re low functioning.



They’re a behavior problem.



They’re lazy.



They don’t care about school.



They’ll never make it in college.



We can easily make all kinds of assumptions even without thinking. 

I’ve seen on Twitter recently the idea that we shouldn’t judge a student by the chapter of their story we walk in on. That is a powerful thought. So true! We all know people who’ve had difficult back stories who were probably judged as incapable or unlikely to succeed.



And yet, they made it.



Some famous examples include Albert Einstein, Oprah Winfrey, J.K. Rowling, Walt Disney, Abraham Lincoln and many others. Not only did they make, they became world changers.



I’m gonna try harder to never tell myself a story about a kid that says they can’t because of where they live, what kind of home they come from, the trauma they’ve experienced, or anything else that limits their possibilities.



Things that have been true in the past don’t have to be true for the future. Alan Cohen writes “our history is not our destiny.”



As educators, we cannot buy into the idea that because a kid comes from the wrong side of the tracks, lacks resources, or has a difficult home environment they have limited capacity.



As I wrote in Future Driven

Treat all of your students like future world changers. I know there are some who are difficult, disrespectful, and disengaged. But don’t let that place limits on what they might accomplish someday. Believe in their possibilities and build on their strengths.

Kids can overcome any obstacle placed in their way. Don’t believe it? How can you know what might be possible with effort, enthusiasm, and continuous learning? 



And when no one else in the world is seeing a kid for the genius of what’s inside them, it’s time for educators to step up and be the ones who find that spark. 



No limits. No excuses.



What story are you telling yourself? What story are you believing about yourself? What story are you believing about your students?



The culture on the inside of your school must be stronger than the culture on the outside. There are so many outside voices telling kids what they can’t do, and it’s no wonder that kids start to believe it.



Every school needs every adult who works there to believe in the possibilities of their students, who will push them to greatness every day, who show them how to reach higher and go further. They may have limits crashing down on them from the external realities they live with, but we can help unleash the greatness they have within them. We can help them overcome and break through the limits.



What are specific ways we can help students realize they have greatness within? How can we unleash the potential they have to pursue their unlimited capacity? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More What Story Are You Telling Yourself?



When you think about your students, what stories are you telling yourself about them? I’ve been guilty of buying into limiting stories about who they are, where they come from, or what they’re capable of.



Of course, I care about all of our kids and strive to treat them all with dignity and respect. But it’s easy to see them a certain way if I’m not careful. It’s easy to make judgments. There are subtle thoughts and feelings. I might believe a story that casts some as most likely to succeed and others as at-risk or some other label.



It’s almost effortless to impose our stories on them or accept the limiting stories others believe about them without a question.



They don’t have a chance.



They’re victims of their environment.



They don’t have the right parents, the right influences, the right resources. 



They have an IEP. 



They’re low functioning.



They’re a behavior problem.



They’re lazy.



They don’t care about school.



They’ll never make it in college.



We can easily make all kinds of assumptions even without thinking. 

I’ve seen on Twitter recently the idea that we shouldn’t judge a student by the chapter of their story we walk in on. That is a powerful thought. So true! We all know people who’ve had difficult back stories who were probably judged as incapable or unlikely to succeed.



And yet, they made it.



Some famous examples include Albert Einstein, Oprah Winfrey, J.K. Rowling, Walt Disney, Abraham Lincoln and many others. Not only did they make, they became world changers.



I’m gonna try harder to never tell myself a story about a kid that says they can’t because of where they live, what kind of home they come from, the trauma they’ve experienced, or anything else that limits their possibilities.



Things that have been true in the past don’t have to be true for the future. Alan Cohen writes “our history is not our destiny.”



As educators, we cannot buy into the idea that because a kid comes from the wrong side of the tracks, lacks resources, or has a difficult home environment they have limited capacity.



As I wrote in Future Driven

Treat all of your students like future world changers. I know there are some who are difficult, disrespectful, and disengaged. But don’t let that place limits on what they might accomplish someday. Believe in their possibilities and build on their strengths.

Kids can overcome any obstacle placed in their way. Don’t believe it? How can you know what might be possible with effort, enthusiasm, and continuous learning? 



And when no one else in the world is seeing a kid for the genius of what’s inside them, it’s time for educators to step up and be the ones who find that spark. 



No limits. No excuses.



What story are you telling yourself? What story are you believing about yourself? What story are you believing about your students?



The culture on the inside of your school must be stronger than the culture on the outside. There are so many outside voices telling kids what they can’t do, and it’s no wonder that kids start to believe it.



Every school needs every adult who works there to believe in the possibilities of their students, who will push them to greatness every day, who show them how to reach higher and go further. They may have limits crashing down on them from the external realities they live with, but we can help unleash the greatness they have within them. We can help them overcome and break through the limits.



What are specific ways we can help students realize they have greatness within? How can we unleash the potential they have to pursue their unlimited capacity? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More What Story Are You Telling Yourself?



When you think about your students, what stories are you telling yourself about them? I’ve been guilty of buying into limiting stories about who they are, where they come from, or what they’re capable of.



Of course, I care about all of our kids and strive to treat them all with dignity and respect. But it’s easy to see them a certain way if I’m not careful. It’s easy to make judgments. There are subtle thoughts and feelings. I might believe a story that casts some as most likely to succeed and others as at-risk or some other label.



It’s almost effortless to impose our stories on them or accept the limiting stories others believe about them without a question.



They don’t have a chance.



They’re victims of their environment.



They don’t have the right parents, the right influences, the right resources. 



They have an IEP. 



They’re low functioning.



They’re a behavior problem.



They’re lazy.



They don’t care about school.



They’ll never make it in college.



We can easily make all kinds of assumptions even without thinking. 

I’ve seen on Twitter recently the idea that we shouldn’t judge a student by the chapter of their story we walk in on. That is a powerful thought. So true! We all know people who’ve had difficult back stories who were probably judged as incapable or unlikely to succeed.



And yet, they made it.



Some famous examples include Albert Einstein, Oprah Winfrey, J.K. Rowling, Walt Disney, Abraham Lincoln and many others. Not only did they make, they became world changers.



I’m gonna try harder to never tell myself a story about a kid that says they can’t because of where they live, what kind of home they come from, the trauma they’ve experienced, or anything else that limits their possibilities.



Things that have been true in the past don’t have to be true for the future. Alan Cohen writes “our history is not our destiny.”



As educators, we cannot buy into the idea that because a kid comes from the wrong side of the tracks, lacks resources, or has a difficult home environment they have limited capacity.



As I wrote in Future Driven

Treat all of your students like future world changers. I know there are some who are difficult, disrespectful, and disengaged. But don’t let that place limits on what they might accomplish someday. Believe in their possibilities and build on their strengths.

Kids can overcome any obstacle placed in their way. Don’t believe it? How can you know what might be possible with effort, enthusiasm, and continuous learning? 



And when no one else in the world is seeing a kid for the genius of what’s inside them, it’s time for educators to step up and be the ones who find that spark. 



No limits. No excuses.



What story are you telling yourself? What story are you believing about yourself? What story are you believing about your students?



The culture on the inside of your school must be stronger than the culture on the outside. There are so many outside voices telling kids what they can’t do, and it’s no wonder that kids start to believe it.



Every school needs every adult who works there to believe in the possibilities of their students, who will push them to greatness every day, who show them how to reach higher and go further. They may have limits crashing down on them from the external realities they live with, but we can help unleash the greatness they have within them. We can help them overcome and break through the limits.



What are specific ways we can help students realize they have greatness within? How can we unleash the potential they have to pursue their unlimited capacity? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

      

Read More What Story Are You Telling Yourself?



When you think about your students, what stories are you telling yourself about them? I’ve been guilty of buying into limiting stories about who they are, where they come from, or what they’re capable of.



Of course, I care about all of our kids and strive to treat them all with dignity and respect. But it’s easy to see them a certain way if I’m not careful. It’s easy to make judgments. There are subtle thoughts and feelings. I might believe a story that casts some as most likely to succeed and others as at-risk or some other label.



It’s almost effortless to impose our stories on them or accept the limiting stories others believe about them without a question.



They don’t have a chance.



They’re victims of their environment.



They don’t have the right parents, the right influences, the right resources. 



They have an IEP. 



They’re low functioning.



They’re a behavior problem.



They’re lazy.



They don’t care about school.



They’ll never make it in college.



We can easily make all kinds of assumptions even without thinking. 

I’ve seen on Twitter recently the idea that we shouldn’t judge a student by the chapter of their story we walk in on. That is a powerful thought. So true! We all know people who’ve had difficult back stories who were probably judged as incapable or unlikely to succeed.



And yet, they made it.



Some famous examples include Albert Einstein, Oprah Winfrey, J.K. Rowling, Walt Disney, Abraham Lincoln and many others. Not only did they make, they became world changers.



I’m gonna try harder to never tell myself a story about a kid that says they can’t because of where they live, what kind of home they come from, the trauma they’ve experienced, or anything else that limits their possibilities.



Things that have been true in the past don’t have to be true for the future. Alan Cohen writes “our history is not our destiny.”



As educators, we cannot buy into the idea that because a kid comes from the wrong side of the tracks, lacks resources, or has a difficult home environment they have limited capacity.



As I wrote in Future Driven

Treat all of your students like future world changers. I know there are some who are difficult, disrespectful, and disengaged. But don’t let that place limits on what they might accomplish someday. Believe in their possibilities and build on their strengths.

Kids can overcome any obstacle placed in their way. Don’t believe it? How can you know what might be possible with effort, enthusiasm, and continuous learning? 



And when no one else in the world is seeing a kid for the genius of what’s inside them, it’s time for educators to step up and be the ones who find that spark. 



No limits. No excuses.



What story are you telling yourself? What story are you believing about yourself? What story are you believing about your students?



The culture on the inside of your school must be stronger than the culture on the outside. There are so many outside voices telling kids what they can’t do, and it’s no wonder that kids start to believe it.



Every school needs every adult who works there to believe in the possibilities of their students, who will push them to greatness every day, who show them how to reach higher and go further. They may have limits crashing down on them from the external realities they live with, but we can help unleash the greatness they have within them. We can help them overcome and break through the limits.



What are specific ways we can help students realize they have greatness within? How can we unleash the potential they have to pursue their unlimited capacity? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

      

Read More What Story Are You Telling Yourself?





Most of what is learned in the traditional approach to school is not adaptable learning. It is discrete learning. It’s focused on a specific body of knowledge and isn’t always transferable to new situations. Yesterday’s learning is in silos with distinct separation among the disciplines. It’s the type of learning that was useful in a world where you could train for a profession and be assured of relative stability in that profession for many years.



Gone are those days.



Our world is moving extremely fast. We can’t even fathom how fast things are changing. We’re too close to the change to get a sense of the magnitude. 



How can we deal with this increased complexity and uncertainty? Change is accelerating. And that creates a need for a different type of learning. In Future Driven, I write that adaptable learners will own the future.



So what makes an adaptable learner? Here are 11 characteristics.



1. Recognize Your Environment Is Constantly Changing



Adaptable learners are ready. They embrace change. It’s not just small changes we’re talking about. It’s a tidal wave of change that’s coming. Change is accelerating exponentially. You must be willing to adapt.



2. Reject Comfort and Complacency



You can’t adjust to the changes, meet the challenges, or take advantage of the opportunities without stepping out of your comfort zone.



3. Take Ownership of Results



It’s not helpful to blame poor outcomes on changing circumstances. The adaptable learner looks inward first to find solutions. There’s a stubbornness to find a way or make a way.



4. Show Willingness to Collaborate



No one person can have all the skills needed to meet the challenges of rapid change. But together, it’s possible to leverage our shared abilities for the good of our team.



5. Build Resilience and Perseverance



In an uncertain learning environment, there will be mistakes. It’s important to learn from these mistakes and press on. It’s critical to stay with difficult problems and try different solutions.



6. Demonstrate Care for Others



I believe adaptable learners are caring learners. People find better solutions when there is a larger purpose. When people are caring learners, it makes the learning meaningful.



7. Be Open to Changing Your Mind



No one has it all figured out. Have strong opinions loosely held. If presented with new evidence, be willing to take a new position.



8. Be Flexible in Your Methods, Focused on Your Mission



Our methods and practices must change with the times, but our process of adapting can continue. And ultimately, the mission can continue. 



9. Be Eager to Try New Things and Learn New Skills



Adaptable learners are constantly picking up new skills and adjusting previous skills. There has to be a willingness to do something new even if it’s hard at first.



10. Be Open to Feedback



Feedback is a necessary ingredient to learning. Don’t feel threatened by feedback. Pursue feedback. And use it to adapt and learn.



11. Develop Confidence in Your Ability to Learn



Most people are frightened by the thought of rapid change. But the adaptable learner feels a sense of confidence. When you believe in your ability to learn and solve problems, you view challenges as opportunities.



How are these characteristics being developed in your classroom or school? Are your students ready? Will they thrive in an unpredictable world? Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. I want to hear from you.

Read More 11 Powerful Characteristics of Adaptable Learners





Most of what is learned in the traditional approach to school is not adaptable learning. It is discrete learning. It’s focused on a specific body of knowledge and isn’t always transferable to new situations. Yesterday’s learning is in silos with distinct separation among the disciplines. It’s the type of learning that was useful in a world where you could train for a profession and be assured of relative stability in that profession for many years.



Gone are those days.



Our world is moving extremely fast. We can’t even fathom how fast things are changing. We’re too close to the change to get a sense of the magnitude. 



How can we deal with this increased complexity and uncertainty? Change is accelerating. And that creates a need for a different type of learning. In Future Driven, I write that adaptable learners will own the future.



So what makes an adaptable learner? Here are 11 characteristics.



1. Recognize Your Environment Is Constantly Changing



Adaptable learners are ready. They embrace change. It’s not just small changes we’re talking about. It’s a tidal wave of change that’s coming. Change is accelerating exponentially. You must be willing to adapt.



2. Reject Comfort and Complacency



You can’t adjust to the changes, meet the challenges, or take advantage of the opportunities without stepping out of your comfort zone.



3. Take Ownership of Results



It’s not helpful to blame poor outcomes on changing circumstances. The adaptable learner looks inward first to find solutions. There’s a stubbornness to find a way or make a way.



4. Show Willingness to Collaborate



No one person can have all the skills needed to meet the challenges of rapid change. But together, it’s possible to leverage our shared abilities for the good of our team.



5. Build Resilience and Perseverance



In an uncertain learning environment, there will be mistakes. It’s important to learn from these mistakes and press on. It’s critical to stay with difficult problems and try different solutions.



6. Demonstrate Care for Others



I believe adaptable learners are caring learners. People find better solutions when there is a larger purpose. When people are caring learners, it makes the learning meaningful.



7. Be Open to Changing Your Mind



No one has it all figured out. Have strong opinions loosely held. If presented with new evidence, be willing to take a new position.



8. Be Flexible in Your Methods, Focused on Your Mission



Our methods and practices must change with the times, but our process of adapting can continue. And ultimately, the mission can continue. 



9. Be Eager to Try New Things and Learn New Skills



Adaptable learners are constantly picking up new skills and adjusting previous skills. There has to be a willingness to do something new even if it’s hard at first.



10. Be Open to Feedback



Feedback is a necessary ingredient to learning. Don’t feel threatened by feedback. Pursue feedback. And use it to adapt and learn.



11. Develop Confidence in Your Ability to Learn



Most people are frightened by the thought of rapid change. But the adaptable learner feels a sense of confidence. When you believe in your ability to learn and solve problems, you view challenges as opportunities.



How are these characteristics being developed in your classroom or school? Are your students ready? Will they thrive in an unpredictable world? Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. I want to hear from you.

Read More 11 Powerful Characteristics of Adaptable Learners





Most of what is learned in the traditional approach to school is not adaptable learning. It is discrete learning. It’s focused on a specific body of knowledge and isn’t always transferable to new situations. Yesterday’s learning is in silos with distinct separation among the disciplines. It’s the type of learning that was useful in a world where you could train for a profession and be assured of relative stability in that profession for many years.



Gone are those days.



Our world is moving extremely fast. We can’t even fathom how fast things are changing. We’re too close to the change to get a sense of the magnitude. 



How can we deal with this increased complexity and uncertainty? Change is accelerating. And that creates a need for a different type of learning. In Future Driven, I write that adaptable learners will own the future.



So what makes an adaptable learner? Here are 11 characteristics.



1. Recognize Your Environment Is Constantly Changing



Adaptable learners are ready. They embrace change. It’s not just small changes we’re talking about. It’s a tidal wave of change that’s coming. Change is accelerating exponentially. You must be willing to adapt.



2. Reject Comfort and Complacency



You can’t adjust to the changes, meet the challenges, or take advantage of the opportunities without stepping out of your comfort zone.



3. Take Ownership of Results



It’s not helpful to blame poor outcomes on changing circumstances. The adaptable learner looks inward first to find solutions. There’s a stubbornness to find a way or make a way.



4. Show Willingness to Collaborate



No one person can have all the skills needed to meet the challenges of rapid change. But together, it’s possible to leverage our shared abilities for the good of our team.



5. Build Resilience and Perseverance



In an uncertain learning environment, there will be mistakes. It’s important to learn from these mistakes and press on. It’s critical to stay with difficult problems and try different solutions.



6. Demonstrate Care for Others



I believe adaptable learners are caring learners. People find better solutions when there is a larger purpose. When people are caring learners, it makes the learning meaningful.



7. Be Open to Changing Your Mind



No one has it all figured out. Have strong opinions loosely held. If presented with new evidence, be willing to take a new position.



8. Be Flexible in Your Methods, Focused on Your Mission



Our methods and practices must change with the times, but our process of adapting can continue. And ultimately, the mission can continue. 



9. Be Eager to Try New Things and Learn New Skills



Adaptable learners are constantly picking up new skills and adjusting previous skills. There has to be a willingness to do something new even if it’s hard at first.



10. Be Open to Feedback



Feedback is a necessary ingredient to learning. Don’t feel threatened by feedback. Pursue feedback. And use it to adapt and learn.



11. Develop Confidence in Your Ability to Learn



Most people are frightened by the thought of rapid change. But the adaptable learner feels a sense of confidence. When you believe in your ability to learn and solve problems, you view challenges as opportunities.



How are these characteristics being developed in your classroom or school? Are your students ready? Will they thrive in an unpredictable world? Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. I want to hear from you.

      

Read More 11 Powerful Characteristics of Adaptable Learners





Most of what is learned in the traditional approach to school is not adaptable learning. It is discrete learning. It’s focused on a specific body of knowledge and isn’t always transferable to new situations. Yesterday’s learning is in silos with distinct separation among the disciplines. It’s the type of learning that was useful in a world where you could train for a profession and be assured of relative stability in that profession for many years.



Gone are those days.



Our world is moving extremely fast. We can’t even fathom how fast things are changing. We’re too close to the change to get a sense of the magnitude. 



How can we deal with this increased complexity and uncertainty? Change is accelerating. And that creates a need for a different type of learning. In Future Driven, I write that adaptable learners will own the future.



So what makes an adaptable learner? Here are 11 characteristics.



1. Recognize Your Environment Is Constantly Changing



Adaptable learners are ready. They embrace change. It’s not just small changes we’re talking about. It’s a tidal wave of change that’s coming. Change is accelerating exponentially. You must be willing to adapt.



2. Reject Comfort and Complacency



You can’t adjust to the changes, meet the challenges, or take advantage of the opportunities without stepping out of your comfort zone.



3. Take Ownership of Results



It’s not helpful to blame poor outcomes on changing circumstances. The adaptable learner looks inward first to find solutions. There’s a stubbornness to find a way or make a way.



4. Show Willingness to Collaborate



No one person can have all the skills needed to meet the challenges of rapid change. But together, it’s possible to leverage our shared abilities for the good of our team.



5. Build Resilience and Perseverance



In an uncertain learning environment, there will be mistakes. It’s important to learn from these mistakes and press on. It’s critical to stay with difficult problems and try different solutions.



6. Demonstrate Care for Others



I believe adaptable learners are caring learners. People find better solutions when there is a larger purpose. When people are caring learners, it makes the learning meaningful.



7. Be Open to Changing Your Mind



No one has it all figured out. Have strong opinions loosely held. If presented with new evidence, be willing to take a new position.



8. Be Flexible in Your Methods, Focused on Your Mission



Our methods and practices must change with the times, but our process of adapting can continue. And ultimately, the mission can continue. 



9. Be Eager to Try New Things and Learn New Skills



Adaptable learners are constantly picking up new skills and adjusting previous skills. There has to be a willingness to do something new even if it’s hard at first.



10. Be Open to Feedback



Feedback is a necessary ingredient to learning. Don’t feel threatened by feedback. Pursue feedback. And use it to adapt and learn.



11. Develop Confidence in Your Ability to Learn



Most people are frightened by the thought of rapid change. But the adaptable learner feels a sense of confidence. When you believe in your ability to learn and solve problems, you view challenges as opportunities.



How are these characteristics being developed in your classroom or school? Are your students ready? Will they thrive in an unpredictable world? Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. I want to hear from you.

      

Read More 11 Powerful Characteristics of Adaptable Learners





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations and make sure they are clear.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.





I’m a big advocate of positive and productive change. If one thing is certain, it’s change. There will be change, and we must adapt. Our students must adapt. Our schools must adapt. The world is becoming more complex and uncertain, and that makes change even more imperative. 



But some things never change. Teaching principles, for instance, stand the test of time. Principles are fundamental truths. They are universal and unchanging at their core. These things should be the foundation of who we are and what we do as educators.



-Treat every child, every person, with dignity and respect.



-Make kindness a top concern.



-Communicate clear goals and objectives.



-Set high expectations.



-Believe the best of your students.



-Provide extraordinary learning experiences, not just lessons.



-Make learning relevant to time, place, and the individual.



-Persevere, push through obstacles, and never give up on a child.



-Recognize effort and progress.



-Consistently provide useful and meaningful feedback.



These things will not change. There may be some slight contextual ways that they change. But essentially, they are some of the fundamentals whether we look at education 50 years in the past or 50 years into the future.



But our practices are different. Our practices should be much different than 50 years ago. They should even be different than 5 years ago. They may be different tomorrow, based on our students’ needs. We must adapt our practices to the needs of the students we are working with today, right now. We need to adapt to the changes that are happening in the world right now as well.



Teaching practices are only effective in certain situations and change over time: grading, curriculum, technology, strategies, and lessons all must change to stay relevant.



So…



Be firm in your principles. They are your core beliefs.



Be flexible in your practices. They flow from your principles and are your actions today.



Be firm in your mission. It’s your purpose as an educator.



Be flexible in your methods. Your methods are how you achieve your purpose and may change with the situation.



How are you developing your principles and practices as an educator? Both are important. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

      

Read More Be Firm in Your Principles. Be Flexible in Your Practices.