Tag: Encouragement

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Like many of you, I’ve had so much on my mind lately. I have several blog posts upcoming that will express more of what I’m feeling. But I wanted to share this quick bit with you. 
If we only read and share things that c…

Read More Share Understanding and Spare Pain

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I’m not sure exactly how it got started, but for the past few years I’ve shared a joke every morning with our entire building to start the school day.

It’s important to me to help get each day off to a good start and part of…

Read More How Humor Contributes to School Culture

Countless books have been written on the topic of leadership. There are styles, and theories, and frameworks.

But at it’s essence, leadership is about energy. 

What kind of energy do you bring each day? Are you showing up with enthusiasm a…

Read More Leadership is Energy: Bring It!

Growth requires change. And it also requires doing some things that aren’t comfortable. We all have thought-patterns and beliefs that contribute to our progress or lack of progress. That’s why it’s so important to challenge any beliefs that might be …

Read More 3 Ideas You Must Reject If You Want to Grow

It’s been said the only certainties in life are death and taxes.

Let’s add one to the list. We can be certain there will be problems. As long as we are in this life, there is a 100% guarantee there will be problems.
We all face challenges every…

Read More Problems Usually Seem Worse Than They Are



Earlier this month, we hosted a CharacterStrong training in our school. Our presenter was Houston Kraft, CharacterStrong co-founder. He was amazing with the teachers, staff, and even a few students who attended. 



After the day concluded, I couldn’t stop thinking about how we must bring more of this type of hope, energy, and connection to the daily life of our school. All schools need this work. It’s truly an amazing experience!

As Houston shared with the group, one other idea really jumped out at me from the day. I was reminded just how powerful our lens can be. Our paradigm or perspective can have a powerful impact on the people we interact with. 



It’s true that how we see others, including our students, makes a huge difference in how they see themselves. Let me say that again, how you see your students influences how students will see themselves.



So consider this question Houston presented. Do you see your students as probabilities or as possibilities? Do you see their strengths and what’s possible for them? Or, do you only see the deficits, challenges, and shortcomings? Do you only see what’s probable for them based on how they show up today? Or what might be in their background?



After all, it’s easy to build a case for how another person will behave or what they will achieve in the future. We know that in general past performance is often a good predictor of future performance. It’s also easy to judge on other factors that limit our students and what they can accomplish.

However, if we want to add value, win hearts and minds, or be agents of change in our relationships, we have to see others for who they are becoming, not just for who they are right now. We have to see them as possibilities and not just probabilities. We have to see them as future world changers, as leaders, as influencers, as difference makers. 



And then we need to encourage them, provide experiences for them, and offer opportunities for them to rise up. How we view others has a big impact on how they view themselves. 



5 Ways to See Students as Possibilities



1. Notice their strengths and reinforce them every chance you get.



Every child in every school needs to hear an encouraging word every day. We need to build on the strengths of our students while simultaneously challenging them to stretch themselves to do hard stuff. 


2. Give them opportunities to lead and have responsibilities.


I love this quote from Booker T Washington…

“Few things can help an individual more than to place responsibility on him, and to let him know that you trust him.” -Booker T. Washington

What are ways you can give a student responsibility and demonstrate your trust in him or her? 



3. Listen to your students and respect their voice, background, and culture.



We need to be very careful about placing judgments on students because of our differences. Instead, we need to listen with caring and curious hearts. We need to recognize we’re not there to rescue, fix, or determine their future. We’re there to help, support, and influence them as they discover the story they want to create with their lives.



4. View mistakes as learning opportunities.


When we view mistakes as learning opportunities, we are far less likely to sort students or determine what’s possible for them based on how they show up right now. Many highly accomplished people have leveraged their challenges, failures, and shortcomings to do amazing things in life. Maybe your student will be one of those stories. And your belief in them can make the difference.


5. Never crush a child’s dream.


Yeah, we all know the odds of making it to the NBA are very slim. But my job as an educator is not to remind kids of what they can’t do. Encourage their dreams. But at the same time, hold them accountable to the value of other things along the journey too. NBA players need to be coachable, they need to be learners, and they need to solve problems and use their thinking skills. So good news…my classroom can help you get ready for the NBA!


What other tips do you have for seeing students as possibilities? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Do You View Students as Possibilities or Probabilities?

Earlier this summer our district leadership team spent a day of training together around the Clifton Strengths Assessment. It was really interesting to learn more about self and others and how to leverage our individual and collective strengths to make our impact for kids stronger.



Of my top five strengths, I was a little disappointed to learn that none of them fell into the larger category of Relationship Building. 



That’s right, I often write about how much I value relationships and how important they are, but connecting is not a natural strength for meat least not in my top 5 according to this instrument. 



Our trainer was really helpful in explaining that just because something isn’t a natural strength doesn’t mean you’re not good at it, or that you don’t find value in it. It just requires more effort and intention to be good at it. When you believe strongly in something, you can be effective in it even when it’s not near the top of your strengths.



That was encouraging to me. 



My top 5 strengths were 1. Learner, 2. Activator, 3. Belief, 4. Futuristic (sounds like a familiar book title), and 5. Self-Assurance. These are all areas where I get energy, where I thrive.



But I also realize that relationships are the most important part of what I do. I can’t be effective as an educator or as a human being for that matter, unless relationships are my number one priority. So I will remain intentional about how I strive to connect with others.



I’ve noticed sometimes when I interact with students I feel like I’m saying the same things over and over. Just simply exchanging pleasantries, smiling, nodding, fist-bumping, etc. And then maybe I’ll ask about last night’s game or how their classes are going.



I’ve also noticed that while we often talk about how important relationships are in education, we don’t always share specific strategies for how to build relationships and connect in the middle of all those interactions we have every day. 



But I read an article recently about a study by psychologist Arthur Aron that described how certain questions have proven to build connection between people. And while the questions were designed to be used in a single 45 minute conversation, I’m wondering about how some of these questions might be helpful to me in working with students or colleagues, perhaps in shorter time frames. 



Some of the questions seemed more fitting than others. I thought I would share a few here in case you’re like me and looking for ways to make your conversations more meaningful. The questions were divided into sets based on the level of vulnerability they might require.



I think they might even be good for staff meetings to build more connection and teamwork among teachers. When we share together we grow stronger together.



Set 1



1. Would you like to be famous? In what way?



2. What would constitute a “perfect” day for you?



3. For what in your life do you feel most grateful?



4. If you could wake up tomorrow having gained any one quality or ability, what would it be?



Set 2



5. What is the greatest accomplishment of your life?



6. What do you value most in a friendship?



7. What is your most treasured memory?



8. Is there something you’ve dreamed of doing for a long time? Why haven’t you done it?



Set 3



9. Your house, containing everything you own, catches fire. After saving your loved ones and pets, you have time to safely make a final dash to save any one item. What would it be? Why?



10. When did you last cry in front of another person? By yourself?



11. Make three true “we” statements each. For instance, “We are both in this room feeling…”



There were actually 36 questions total. I’m just sharing a few of the ones that seemed most likely that I might use. I would definitely be uncomfortable asking students, or even colleagues, a few of the questions that were included in the larger group, especially from Set 3. 



You might want to check out the full list of 36 questions and the protocol for the entire activity. You might find some other questions you like for your classroom or school. Or, you might want to try the entire process for date night with your significant other. Enjoy!

What are other questions or topics you rely on to foster connection? I would love to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More 11 Questions that Build Relationships and Foster Connection



I was taught as a kid that the things that you put into your mind would have an influence on who you are and who you are becoming. Garbage in, garbage out. How you fill your cup will determine what spills over in your life. 



Actually, at the time, I remember thinking some of this was just to keep me from listening to the “wrong” type of music in my teen years. 



I think my understanding of the concept was over simplified and more focused on what I should not do. But it has just as much to do with what we should do.

The Bible puts it this way…

Above all else, guard your heart,

for everything you do flows from it.

Keep your mouth free of perversity;

keep corrupt talk far from your lips.

Let your eyes look straight ahead;

fix your gaze directly before you.

Give careful thought to the paths for your feet

and be steadfast in all your ways.

Do not turn to the right or the left;

keep your foot from evil.

Proverbs 4:23-27

Now I understand more clearly the truth of this. We really do become what we think about about. The things that we focus on become more visible to us, more evident, in every area of life. It becomes our lens. And that influences our behavior.



When our family bought a Chevy Malibu a few years ago, all of the sudden I noticed how many Chevy Malibus were on the road. I had never noticed before, but these cars were everywhere. 



When a student or parent says to me, “There’s so much drama in high school” I find it interesting because I know others who haven’t experienced all of that drama. They see social conflict everywhere because it’s the paradigm they engage with. Others mostly avoid the drama, because they focus their attention on other things.



Tony Robbins has described it this way, “Where your focus goes, energy flows.” You move in the direction of the things you focus on. Your energy goes toward those things.



When you practice gratitude, it’s amazing how you will notice more things to be grateful for. I believe you actually start to have more things to be grateful for. Good things come to people who believe the best and expect the best.



Les Brown said it simply, “What you think about, you bring about.”



Below are 8 things that will influence your growth and who you are becoming. We often think this is the type of advice our students need, and for sure they need to hear this message. But I think we all need to reflect on these things. Everyone needs this message.



How are we spending our time? What are we putting into our minds, rehearsing in our minds, and how can we ensure that it is leading us where we want to go? The patterns of our mind are powerful. They can empower us or defeat us.



The things we think about influence our effectiveness in every area of life. If you want to be a more effective educator, friend, spouse, or neighbor, think about how you are being intentional with these things.



8 Things That Influence Who You’re Becoming

1. What you watch

2. What you listen to

3. What you read

4. What you believe

5. How you spend your time

6. Who you spend your time with

7. The things you say to yourself

8. The thoughts you choose to accept



What would you add to this list? What stands out to you on this list? Leave a comment below or respond on Twitter or Facebook. I’d love to hear what you think.

Read More 8 Things That Influence Who You’re Becoming



How important are bus drivers? Our kids’ safety is in their hands. They are the first point of contact in the morning and help set the tone for the day. Bus drivers make a difference. And so do cooks. And custodians. And everyone else who gives so much to the life of a school.



I was speaking last week at the Cypress-Fairbanks Rigor, Relevance, and Relationships Leadership conference in Houston. It was a great event, and I enjoyed making some wonderful connections with educators there.


One of the people I met shared some valuable wisdom with me. The conference provided a shuttle to and from the hotel, and my driver’s name was Tammy.


She drives a school bus for the district, but she’s not just a regular school bus driver. She substitutes for all the bus routes in the Cy-Fair district (one of the largest in Texas) wherever she’s needed.


I can’t imagine how difficult that must be to drive a different group of kids every day, on a different school bus, in city traffic, with your back turned to them. That takes a special skill set!


Tammy is amazing! I was inspired by her commitment and her kindness. I asked her how she handles working with so many different kids while navigating unfamiliar routes.


I’m paraphrasing what Tammy said…and then adding a few of my thoughts too. She shared great advice and encouragement!


1. “They can tell I enjoy them and love them. And that makes all the difference.”


When kids know you care about them and accept them, you’ll bring out the best in them. The quickest way to change another person’s behavior is to change your behavior towards them. Every kid wants to feel like they are easy to love.


2. “When I ask them to do something, I address them as sir or m’am. And when they follow through, I say thank you.”


Kids are going to make mistakes. But if you make it a point to enjoy being with them, and treat them with great respect and care, there is almost no mistake you can’t correct. They’ll be far more open to your feedback when they feel that you have the highest respect for them.


3. “When those middle school students realize they can’t get under my skin, I have them right where I want them.”


The kids are going to test you and see how you respond. If it’s with anger or frustration, the situation is likely to escalate. If you are firm, polite, and also calm and caring, you’ll get a much better result. Let them know you’re in their corner even when you’re correcting them.


4. “I keep doing this because they need me.”


Tammy explained she had thought about retiring, but I could tell she also felt great satisfaction and purpose in what she’s doing. She sees purpose and contribution in what she does. She’s making things better with each interaction she has.


5. “I can tell you put your heart and soul into what you do.”


She said that to me. I was so honored and humbled. She gave me a big hug when she dropped me off at the airport. And I’m not even that much of a hugger. She encouraged me and affirmed me and added value to me.


Who makes the difference in your school?


Every person who works in a school makes a difference. Every person contributes to the culture of the school. 


What if everyone in your school gave as generously as Tammy to love and support the kids and the adults in the school? What if we all showed a little more care and appreciation for every person in every interaction? That’s how you build a strong school culture.


Who is someone who inspires you? How are you giving generously to others? Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. I would love to hear from you.

Read More What You Do Matters





Earlier this month, Dave Burgess shared a great tweet of a slide from Amy Fast’s presentation at What Great Educators Do Differently in Houston.

“The most important work we do in schools is the emotional labor.” – @fastcrayon at #WGEDD #tlap pic.twitter.com/Doh0cGhXJh

— Dave Burgess (@burgessdave) April 2, 2019

It’s true. It’s so important to do the emotional work, your emotional work to connect and care and empathize, because it influences the emotions of everyone around you. It influences others. 

How important are emotions? Emotions are “energy in motion.” Our emotions are always moving us toward something or away from something. We don’t always have to choose to follow those emotions, but they are powerful. Just understand that when a student or colleague is stuck in a performance rut, there is nearly always an emotional component to that.



Most people want to succeed and do well, right? They didn’t wake up in the morning wanting to fail. But sometimes they lose their way. At some point, their thoughts, beliefs, or feelings start getting in the way. Their words and actions are impacted. They allow the obstacles to weigh them down or stall their progress.

We need to create positive emotions in our classrooms and in our schools toward each other, toward learning, and toward making a difference. We need to support each other and believe in each other and never give up on each other. A positive learning environment is a positive emotional environment.



How often are there moments in your school that bring great joy, hope, and purpose? Those moments help create a heightened state of emotion. A peak state of emotion leads to a greater sense of motivation.



Think about it…

When you are laughing, smiling, encouraging, connecting, complimenting, progressing, and succeeding, you will have more energy, enthusiasm, effort, excitement, enjoyment, engagement and more. 



And conversely…

When you are frowning, criticizing, isolating, blaming, or complaining, you’ll reap what you sow with that too. You’ll have less energy. You’ll be more tired. You’ll be less likely to take a risk or do something great.



If you want to increase learning and performance, create an environment that provides for positive emotional support and growth. Create a positive environment. Create an uplifting environment, a fun environment. Bring your best energy.

Be intentional to create opportunities for students and colleagues to have more positive emotions. When the emotional environment improves, everyone has a better chance to change and grow and experience more powerful learning and connection.



What are ways you create an positive emotional environment in your classroom or school?



How do you set the tone each day for connection and care?



What behaviors need to be addressed that are damaging the emotional environment?



I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter. Thanks for all you do to bring your positive vibes each and every day!

Read More The Importance of Emotions in Learning



How do you respond when students don’t exhibit the behaviors you would like to see? Do you tell students they need to change? Do you lecture them about responsibility or respect? Do you complain to your colleagues about kids these days? Do you punish or reward?



How effective are those options? Telling doesn’t work. Lectures create distance. Complaining doesn’t empower anyone. And rewards and punishments mostly work only to get compliance and not to build better better behavioral skills.



But what would be an effective response to harmful behaviors? 



What can educators do to better address non-learning behaviors? 



Teaching behavior is better than just punishing behavior.



Teach the students the new behaviors you want to see.



If they aren’t organized, teach them how to be organized.



If they aren’t respectful, teach them about respect and how to show it.



If they aren’t responsible, teach them new skills to show responsibility.



If they are distracted, teach them how to focus.



Break down any behavior into specific skills and teach your students the steps to successfully exhibit the behaviors.



How to Teach Behavior



1. Know your own expectations for your students. Have a vision for exactly what you expect. Know exactly what you want to see.



2. Communicate your expectations clearly. Be very specific. Over communicate. Explain why the behavior is important. Use stories and examples to make it clear.



3. Build relationships. Students will always learn behavior lessons better from someone that’s trusted and connected.



4. Discuss unwanted behaviors with your students. Don’t tell. Ask questions. Listen. Understand.



5. Give students feedback on how they’re doing. Correct them. Direct them. But most of all, encourage them.



6. Facilitate reflection with your students. Ask them to think about their own behavior and how they are learning and growing. Track progress.



7. Offer a fresh start each day. Don’t bring up previous mistakes except as a teaching opportunity but never to shame or gain the upper hand. Be patient.



8. Always protect the dignity of each child. Don’t lose your cool and say something harmful. Don’t use shame or guilt to motivate. 



How would you treat him/her if his/her grandmother were watching?



9. Review. It’s always good to circle back around to important lessons about expectations and how things are going.



What if I don’t have time to teach behavior?



Better question: What if you DON’T take the time to teach behavior? If you don’t teach the behaviors you want to see, you’ll spend much more time correcting issues that might have been prevented. Make sure your expectations are clear.



When you are intentional about teaching the behaviors you want to see, you are being proactive instead of reactive. You don’t just wait until there is a problem. Try to see things from the student’s perspective and anticipate what reminders they might need.



What do you do to be proactive about teaching behaviors in your classroom? Share your strategies by leaving a comment below or responding on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Importance of Teaching the Behaviors You Want to See



How do you respond when students don’t exhibit the behaviors you would like to see? Do you tell students they need to change? Do you lecture them about responsibility or respect? Do you complain to your colleagues about kids these days? Do you punish or reward?



How effective are those options? Telling doesn’t work. Lectures create distance. Complaining doesn’t empower anyone. And rewards and punishments mostly work only to get compliance and not to build better better behavioral skills.



But what would be an effective response to harmful behaviors? 



What can educators do to better address non-learning behaviors? 



Teaching behavior is better than just punishing behavior.



Teach the students the new behaviors you want to see.



If they aren’t organized, teach them how to be organized.



If they aren’t respectful, teach them about respect and how to show it.



If they aren’t responsible, teach them new skills to show responsibility.



If they are distracted, teach them how to focus.



Break down any behavior into specific skills and teach your students the steps to successfully exhibit the behaviors.



How to Teach Behavior



1. Know your own expectations for your students. Have a vision for exactly what you expect. Know exactly what you want to see.



2. Communicate your expectations clearly. Be very specific. Over communicate. Explain why the behavior is important. Use stories and examples to make it clear.



3. Build relationships. Students will always learn behavior lessons better from someone that’s trusted and connected.



4. Discuss unwanted behaviors with your students. Don’t tell. Ask questions. Listen. Understand.



5. Give students feedback on how they’re doing. Correct them. Direct them. But most of all, encourage them.



6. Facilitate reflection with your students. Ask them to think about their own behavior and how they are learning and growing. Track progress.



7. Offer a fresh start each day. Don’t bring up previous mistakes except as a teaching opportunity but never to shame or gain the upper hand. Be patient.



8. Always protect the dignity of each child. Don’t lose your cool and say something harmful. Don’t use shame or guilt to motivate. 



How would you treat him/her if his/her grandmother were watching?



9. Review. It’s always good to circle back around to important lessons about expectations and how things are going.



What if I don’t have time to teach behavior?



Better question: What if you DON’T take the time to teach behavior? If you don’t teach the behaviors you want to see, you’ll spend much more time correcting issues that might have been prevented. Make sure your expectations are clear.



When you are intentional about teaching the behaviors you want to see, you are being proactive instead of reactive. You don’t just wait until there is a problem. Try to see things from the student’s perspective and anticipate what reminders they might need.



What do you do to be proactive about teaching behaviors in your classroom? Share your strategies by leaving a comment below or responding on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More The Importance of Teaching the Behaviors You Want to See



Last Christmas, we decided to add a new Boston Terrier puppy to our family. His name is Rudy. There have been many times over the past months that Rudy has tested our patience. And he’s tested the patience of our older Boston Terrier, Max, too.



He’s chewed up the house. He’s been slow to house train. He’s been quick to disobey. He’s a little too affectionate. He’s in your face affectionate. It’s cute and annoying at the same time.



But a few months ago we noticed something was wrong with Rudy. He was having problems with one of his back legs. It would happen occasionally, and he would limp around on three legs for a while, and then he was back to his old self.



But the problem became even more frequent. A trip to the vet revealed Rudy’s leg problem was Patellar Luxation, a knee cap that was dislocating. The leg would not get better on its own and needed to be addressed surgically.



So Rudy was scheduled for his operation.



After Rudy had his surgery, the vet said we needed to keep him from using the repaired knee. “No using that leg,” he said. 



Just how are you supposed to keep a dog from using a leg? Hey Rudy, no using that leg, okay? 



But turns out that wasn’t a problem. Rudy didn’t want to use the leg. I guess it was pretty sore, and he quit using it entirely after the surgery. 



Even weeks later, after several visits to the vet, Rudy was still not using the repaired leg. The vet suggested several ideas for getting him to start using the leg again, including swim therapy in our bath tub. Seriously.



But Rudy still refused to use his fourth leg. He was a three-legged dog, it seemed, forever.



However, it was clear from our trips to the veterinarian, Rudy’s leg had healed properly. He was simply choosing not to use the leg. He had created a limitation in his canine brain that he was a three-legged dog. He had created a new identity that kept him from reaching his full capacity.



Would Rudy ever walk on four legs again?



And then, in a matter of a couple of weeks, Rudy started testing the fourth leg a little more. He pushed out of his comfort zone and into his growth zone. The video clips below were shot on the same day in the span of about an hour. You’ll see his three legged routine and then what’s possible when he pushes past the limits. Rudy was very capable it seems.






When Rudy got past his limits, he was running around like any puppy should. He was back to annoying all of us again, in his regular way. He was starting to utilize his fourth leg to its full capacity.



But here’s the thing, how many of us are choosing, perhaps unintentionally, to be three-legged dogs? Could it be that most of us are only using a fraction of our true capacity? What might be possible if we would only test our limits and continue to learn and grow?



I think most people are only operating at a small percentage of full capacity. And I think most schools are only operating at a small percentage of full capacity. We’re probably capable of so much more. Our schools are probably capable of so much more.



Sure, we’re trying to make progress, but we’re walking on three legs. We’re trying to make things better, but we need to make ourselves better. Change you first.



What we really need is to cut loose and run on all four legs. And we need to create conditions where other people are able to reach their capacity, too. 



So how can you reach your capacity? You have to get started on a path of growth. Break through your limits with the following…



1. The BELIEF that you need to get better.



If you think you’re doing just fine on three legs, you’ll never find your true capacity. You’ll just keep limping along. You need a vision of what’s possible. Moreover, you also need the belief that things CAN get better. Don’t allow your past performance to limit your future possibilities.



2. The DESIRE to want to get better.



Growth is the more difficult choice. It’s easier just to be satisfied, either intentionally or unintentionally, with how things are. We have to crush apathy and reject mediocrity. We have to desire excellence. You have to commit. You have to really want it.



3. The WILLINGNESS to take action to get better.



You have to test your limits. You have to see what that fourth leg is capable of doing. Sometimes it feels really risky to step out in faith. It might hurt. But you must take action. Destiny is about decisions. It might be hard, but it’s worth it. 



4. The WISDOM to learn how to get better.



There is a certain wisdom and humility needed to recognize that we’re not currently all we could be. We’re probably capable of more, if we’re honest about it. We must therefore seek out opportunities to learn from others. We must apply the things we learn. We have to pursue growth intentionally. 



5. The DISCIPLINE to follow through and be GREAT.



Living a no limits life requires discipline. A new direction requires discipline. Full capacity requires discipline. You have to eliminate the choices that aren’t leading you toward your capacity. You have to be relentless to achieve the results.



What are some ways you want to test your limits? What are some ways you need to test your limits? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter

Read More Are You Reaching Your Full Capacity?



When I was fresh out of college, it was time to start my career as an educator. I was very passionate about the game of basketball, and that was part of the reason I wanted to teach and coach. I had passion for the game. I still love it today and look forward to the start of college basketball season.



But while I had passion, I didn’t necessarily have a strong or clear purpose. I was just finding my way.



Although passion is great, we can be passionate about things that lack significance. We can be passionate about a game. We can be passionate about cars, or coffee, or even Netflix. Certainly, there’s nothing wrong with passion and enthusiasm for these things. But it’s not something with inherently larger meaning or significance.



Purpose, on the other hand, is about having a mission. It’s about living a life of meaning and significance in a very intentional way. I’m defining purpose here as something that transcends what we do and becomes more about who we are.



It’s not what you do, it’s why you do it.



Your true purpose isn’t limited to one role in particular. I can carry out my purpose through my role as a principal, or as a dad, or as a writer through blogging or writing books. I can carry out my purpose in whole variety of ways. I can also carry it out in casual conversations with just about anyone I meet. 



While I am passionate about being a principal, who I am is much bigger than my profession. My overarching purpose is much bigger than my title. Don’t get me wrong, being a principal is one of the most rewarding ways I get to share my purpose. I love it. 



But my why is still much bigger.



My why is to help others grow their own capacity and find their personal path of purpose. A purpose that has power adds value to people. It focuses on making things better for others.



My passions may change over time, but for the most part, I believe my purpose will only grow stronger.



There are so many reasons to live out your purpose…

1. No one can take away your purpose. Some things we are passionate about might be taken from us. Don’t build your foundation on something you might lose.

2. Your purpose is usually developed, not discovered. We grow into our purpose. It doesn’t just arrive like the mail is delivered. It’s grown like the largest tree in your back yard. 

3. You won’t be fulfilled if you aren’t fulfilling your purpose. You’ll be restless and uneasy and searching for meaning. So many people are searching for happiness and what they really desire is purpose.

4. Apathy is no match for true purpose. The key to motivation is to know your why.

5. When you connect with people who share your purpose, it’s electrifying. You feel understood and energized. It’s like doubling the voltage.

6. When you have a strong sense of purpose, obstacles are no match for your persistence and perseverance.

7. Your purpose will give you a sense of peace. You’ll know you’re doing exactly what you’re supposed to be doing when you’re living out your purpose.



What are your thoughts on living with a sense of purpose? How can we help our students find meaning and significance? How can we help them find a path of purpose? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Passion Flows from Purpose



When I was fresh out of college, it was time to start my career as an educator. I was very passionate about the game of basketball, and that was part of the reason I wanted to teach and coach. I had passion for the game. I still love it today and look forward to the start of college basketball season.



But while I had passion, I didn’t necessarily have a strong or clear purpose. I was just finding my way.



Although passion is great, we can be passionate about things that lack significance. We can be passionate about a game. We can be passionate about cars, or coffee, or even Netflix. Certainly, there’s nothing wrong with passion and enthusiasm for these things. But it’s not something with inherently larger meaning or significance.



Purpose, on the other hand, is about having a mission. It’s about living a life of meaning and significance in a very intentional way. I’m defining purpose here as something that transcends what we do and becomes more about who we are.



It’s not what you do, it’s why you do it.



Your true purpose isn’t limited to one role in particular. I can carry out my purpose through my role as a principal, or as a dad, or as a writer through blogging or writing books. I can carry out my purpose in whole variety of ways. I can also carry it out in casual conversations with just about anyone I meet. 



While I am passionate about being a principal, who I am is much bigger than my profession. My overarching purpose is much bigger than my title. Don’t get me wrong, being a principal is one of the most rewarding ways I get to share my purpose. I love it. 



But my why is still much bigger.



My why is to help others grow their own capacity and find their personal path of purpose. A purpose that has power adds value to people. It focuses on making things better for others.



My passions may change over time, but for the most part, I believe my purpose will only grow stronger.



There are so many reasons to live out your purpose…

1. No one can take away your purpose. Some things we are passionate about might be taken from us. Don’t build your foundation on something you might lose.

2. Your purpose is usually developed, not discovered. We grow into our purpose. It doesn’t just arrive like the mail is delivered. It’s grown like the largest tree in your back yard. 

3. You won’t be fulfilled if you aren’t fulfilling your purpose. You’ll be restless and uneasy and searching for meaning. So many people are searching for happiness and what they really desire is purpose.

4. Apathy is no match for true purpose. The key to motivation is to know your why.

5. When you connect with people who share your purpose, it’s electrifying. You feel understood and energized. It’s like doubling the voltage.

6. When you have a strong sense of purpose, obstacles are no match for your persistence and perseverance.

7. Your purpose will give you a sense of peace. You’ll know you’re doing exactly what you’re supposed to be doing when you’re living out your purpose.



What are your thoughts on living with a sense of purpose? How can we help our students find meaning and significance? How can we help them find a path of purpose? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Passion Flows from Purpose



When I was fresh out of college, it was time to start my career as an educator. I was very passionate about the game of basketball, and that was part of the reason I wanted to teach and coach. I had passion for the game. I still love it today and look forward to the start of college basketball season.



But while I had passion, I didn’t necessarily have a strong or clear purpose. I was just finding my way.



Although passion is great, we can be passionate about things that lack significance. We can be passionate about a game. We can be passionate about cars, or coffee, or even Netflix. Certainly, there’s nothing wrong with passion and enthusiasm for these things. But it’s not something with inherently larger meaning or significance.



Purpose, on the other hand, is about having a mission. It’s about living a life of meaning and significance in a very intentional way. I’m defining purpose here as something that transcends what we do and becomes more about who we are.



It’s not what you do, it’s why you do it.



Your true purpose isn’t limited to one role in particular. I can carry out my purpose through my role as a principal, or as a dad, or as a writer through blogging or writing books. I can carry out my purpose in whole variety of ways. I can also carry it out in casual conversations with just about anyone I meet. 



While I am passionate about being a principal, who I am is much bigger than my profession. My overarching purpose is much bigger than my title. Don’t get me wrong, being a principal is one of the most rewarding ways I get to share my purpose. I love it. 



But my why is still much bigger.



My why is to help others grow their own capacity and find their personal path of purpose. A purpose that has power adds value to people. It focuses on making things better for others.



My passions may change over time, but for the most part, I believe my purpose will only grow stronger.



There are so many reasons to live out your purpose…

1. No one can take away your purpose. Some things we are passionate about might be taken from us. Don’t build your foundation on something you might lose.

2. Your purpose is usually developed, not discovered. We grow into our purpose. It doesn’t just arrive like the mail is delivered. It’s grown like the largest tree in your back yard. 

3. You won’t be fulfilled if you aren’t fulfilling your purpose. You’ll be restless and uneasy and searching for meaning. So many people are searching for happiness and what they really desire is purpose.

4. Apathy is no match for true purpose. The key to motivation is to know your why.

5. When you connect with people who share your purpose, it’s electrifying. You feel understood and energized. It’s like doubling the voltage.

6. When you have a strong sense of purpose, obstacles are no match for your persistence and perseverance.

7. Your purpose will give you a sense of peace. You’ll know you’re doing exactly what you’re supposed to be doing when you’re living out your purpose.



What are your thoughts on living with a sense of purpose? How can we help our students find meaning and significance? How can we help them find a path of purpose? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Passion Flows from Purpose



When I was fresh out of college, it was time to start my career as an educator. I was very passionate about the game of basketball, and that was part of the reason I wanted to teach and coach. I had passion for the game. I still love it today and look forward to the start of college basketball season.



But while I had passion, I didn’t necessarily have a strong or clear purpose. I was just finding my way.



Although passion is great, we can be passionate about things that lack significance. We can be passionate about a game. We can be passionate about cars, or coffee, or even Netflix. Certainly, there’s nothing wrong with passion and enthusiasm for these things. But it’s not something with inherently larger meaning or significance.



Purpose, on the other hand, is about having a mission. It’s about living a life of meaning and significance in a very intentional way. I’m defining purpose here as something that transcends what we do and becomes more about who we are.



It’s not what you do, it’s why you do it.



Your true purpose isn’t limited to one role in particular. I can carry out my purpose through my role as a principal, or as a dad, or as a writer through blogging or writing books. I can carry out my purpose in whole variety of ways. I can also carry it out in casual conversations with just about anyone I meet. 



While I am passionate about being a principal, who I am is much bigger than my profession. My overarching purpose is much bigger than my title. Don’t get me wrong, being a principal is one of the most rewarding ways I get to share my purpose. I love it. 



But my why is still much bigger.



My why is to help others grow their own capacity and find their personal path of purpose. A purpose that has power adds value to people. It focuses on making things better for others.



My passions may change over time, but for the most part, I believe my purpose will only grow stronger.



There are so many reasons to live out your purpose…

1. No one can take away your purpose. Some things we are passionate about might be taken from us. Don’t build your foundation on something you might lose.

2. Your purpose is usually developed, not discovered. We grow into our purpose. It doesn’t just arrive like the mail is delivered. It’s grown like the largest tree in your back yard. 

3. You won’t be fulfilled if you aren’t fulfilling your purpose. You’ll be restless and uneasy and searching for meaning. So many people are searching for happiness and what they really desire is purpose.

4. Apathy is no match for true purpose. The key to motivation is to know your why.

5. When you connect with people who share your purpose, it’s electrifying. You feel understood and energized. It’s like doubling the voltage.

6. When you have a strong sense of purpose, obstacles are no match for your persistence and perseverance.

7. Your purpose will give you a sense of peace. You’ll know you’re doing exactly what you’re supposed to be doing when you’re living out your purpose.



What are your thoughts on living with a sense of purpose? How can we help our students find meaning and significance? How can we help them find a path of purpose? I want to hear from you. Leave a comment below or respond on Facebook or Twitter.

Read More Passion Flows from Purpose



I’ve been thinking quite a bit lately about negative student behaviors and how we respond effectively. 


Here are five ideas that have been on my mind…


1. It can be really easy to become judgmental about negative student behavior, especially when it’s repetitive. It’s always appropriate to be corrective about non-learning behaviors, but it isn’t right to place ourselves in a position of greater worth than the student. We might think, I would never do that. It’s like we think we’re superior in some way. And then we make generalizations about their motives based on the behavior. We act as if we know what’s going on in the student’s heart. 


That’s the type of judgment that causes resentment and steals dignity. Judgement isn’t always a bad thing. We actually know having good judgement is a good thing. That’s how we know when something is right or wrong. But relationships get crazy when we start to judge motives. That’s not ours to judge. Judge behaviors. They are observable and there are standards that must be held. Don’t judge intentions. We can never know another person’s heart.


2. Every negative behavior a student exhibits is probably closely resembling a negative behavior I’ve exhibited in my own life at one time or another. If I’m really honest with myself, it’s probably like I’m looking in the mirror. I may not have done that exact thing to the degree that it was done, but I’ve struggled with that issue at some point and acted in a similar manner. There are only so many categories of mistakes, and I’m pretty sure I’ve covered them all at one time or another.


3. Number two is really important because it reminds me to have empathy, to be understanding, and to work with a student through the issue instead of towering over them and being iron-fisted about the issue. We want to correct the issue and preserve the relationship. We need to walk through this with the student.


4. The things that push my buttons the most might be the things that I actually struggle with the most. It’s ironic, but often we are less forgiving and less patient with the behaviors that are most like the ones we struggle with. Think about an issue that is a struggle for you. Are you especially hard on students when they make a mistake in this area? Maybe not if they make the mistake in the same way you do. But if they make it in a different way or to a greater degree, look out. It might push all your buttons.


5. When students show up poorly and have behaviors that are destructive, I need to also look at the environmental factors at play. If I was in the same environment as the student, might I also act in this way? What can be changed about the environment to help the student make different choices? That does not relieve the student of responsibility or accountability for bad decisions, but I don’t want to just enforce accountability. I want to help create conditions so the student will succeed next time.


I think we could all stand to be a little more patient with our students. Heck, sometimes we need to be a little more patient with ourselves too. Mistakes are opportunities to learn more about who we are and to reflect and become stronger, more caring people overall.


I would love to hear your thoughts as always. What’s on your mind after reading this post? Leave a comment below or respond on Twitter or Facebook.

Read More When Student Behavior Is Like Looking in the Mirror