Purpose Motivated Leadership

We have a student who is an orphan at my school.
Clear-Sense-Of-Purpose She struggles with so many emotions and doesn’t always make the best decisions–even though she still makes me proud and is passing all her classes.

One day she skipped school, and I assigned her to our ISP room (one teacher/no social interaction for the day) for discipline.

When she caught up on her work, she asked if she could read something, so I sent her the book Chicken Soup for the Teenager’s Soul.

Later in the day, she asked to see me.

When she came into my office, she told me that she had read the entire book and wanted more. So our librarian sent over a overnight canadian viagra copy of Chicken Soup for the Woman’s Soul. She asked if she could take it home. When I told her the librarian Female viagra said she could keep it for two weeks, she clutched it to her chest and beamed.

“Awesome!” she shouted.

You would have levitra cost thought it was a Christmas present.

Sometimes I have days when I don’t enjoy what I do. Keeping track of all the demands–dealing with discipline decisions, for instance, can be wearing. But in moments like these, I remember why I am here.

It is also a reminder that each of us can enjoy work more when we remember it has a purpose.

You don’t have to be an educator to find meaning in work. Whether it’s providing safer designs through engineering, better care through medicine, excellent service and entertainment through running a restaurant–whatever your vocation, God gifts us to make better the world around us.

Recently, I was listening to an EntreLeadership Podcast interview of Lisa Earle McLeod discussing her book Selling With Noble Purpose.

The premise of the conversation was that in corporations, the sales reps who make up the top 2% of highest achievers share a surprising similarity: without exception, each one was motivated more by purpose than profit.

And guess what? In the process, they profited more!

I find the same is true in school.

When we walk through our day remembering that our purpose is more than test scores or “putting out fires”–when we discover the joy of supporting our team members or helping students discover the wonder of learning, then we tap into a purpose that we can clutch to our chests.

In all the do’s and don’ts of school leadership, don’t forget the higher purpose of being called to serve. Our profit margins may not be the same as a corporate sales rep. But the benefit we receive from watching students succeed is something money can’t buy.

Now It’s Your Turn: Think back to an experience that has reminded you of your purpose in your position. What happened to remind you of your purpose? What are some ways you have learned to hold on to that focus? Share with the rest of us!

Copyright 2013 by William D. Parker, Connect through Twitter with handle @williamdp or at www.williamdparker.com

8 Comments

  1. […] We have a student who is an orphan at my school. She struggles with so many emotions and doesn't always make the best decisions–even though she still makes me proud and is passing all her classes….  […]

    October 23, 2013
    Reply
  2. […] We have a student who is an orphan at my school. She struggles with so many emotions and doesn't always make the best decisions–even though she still makes me proud and is passing all her classes….  […]

    October 23, 2013
    Reply
  3. […] We have a student who is an orphan at my school. She struggles with so many emotions and doesn't always make the best decisions–even though she still makes me proud and is passing all her classes….  […]

    October 24, 2013
    Reply
  4. Jose Sandoval said:

    Will someone please share this website with the principals of North Carolina who seem to be so shortsighted that they can’t tell good data from bad data!!!

    October 25, 2013
    Reply
    • christina said:

      As a principal from NC, I don’t understand the I intentions of your comment. There is no good or bad data. It is just the data. We take ownership of our data and use that data to make instructional decisions.

      November 2, 2013
      Reply
  5. @8amber8 said:

    I LOVE this post!! 🙂 I took a paycut to move from my technology position into my administrative role, and have NEVER regretted it! Connecting with students makes every day bettr and consistently reminds me that this is why I chose to do this with my path in life!

    October 25, 2013
    Reply
  6. […] We have a student who is an orphan at my school. She struggles with so many emotions and doesn't always make the best decisions–even though she still makes me proud and is passing all her classes….  […]

    October 25, 2013
    Reply

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